French president honors Charlie Hebdo, kosher market victims

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Charlie Hebdo attacks anniversary, commemoration
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French president honors Charlie Hebdo, kosher market victims
A man removes the covering on a plaque earlier unveiled by French President Francois Hollande outside satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo former office, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2016 in Paris. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. The plaque was hastily covered up after authorities discovered a spelling error in the name of slain cartoonist Georges Wolinski, the black covering was later removed, and a new plaque is being prepared after the embarrassing incident. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A plaque unveiled by President Francois Hollande pays tribute to the victims of last year's January attacks outside the kosher supermarket, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016 in Paris. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Plaque reads: In memory of te Jan.9 , 2015 antisemitic attack in the kosher superlmarket. Names. They died victims of terrorism. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A man enters the kosher supermarket as flowers laid by French President Francois Hollande are seen outside, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year.(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
People stand next to spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
People watch and take photos of a spray painted portrait of late police officer Ahmed Merabet and reading "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A plaque honoring policeman Ahmed Merabet is pictured in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. French President Francois Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Plaque reads: In the memory of police officer Ahmed Merabet, killed on Jan.7 2015, victim of terrorism and killed in service. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Policemen walk past spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Policemen stand next to spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A French soldier patrols after French President Francois Hollande attended a ceremony to pay tribute to the victims of last year's January attacks outside the kosher supermarket in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. (Ian Langsdon, Pool Photo via AP)
French President Francois Hollande kisses late police officer Ahmed Merabet's mother during commemorations in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Francois Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Hollande paid homage to the police officer killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (Benoit Tessier, Pool Photo via AP)
A painting with the message 'I am Ahmed' is seen in a street on January 5, 2016 after a ceremony to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site where policeman Ahmed Merabet was killed during the last year's January attack in Paris. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
The mother of Ahmed Merabet (L), the policeman who was killed during the last year's January attack, leaves on January 5, 2016 in Paris after a ceremony to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site where her son was shot. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / POOL / BENOIT TESSIER (Photo credit should read BENOIT TESSIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Charb on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Honore on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Tignous on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 on Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Cabu on of the the victims killed on the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Wolinski on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
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PARIS (AP) — French President Francois Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year.

Tuesday's ceremonies come as Charlie Hebdo is releasing a special anniversary issue laced with obscene and offensive cartoons, its surviving artists and columnists vaunting their freedom to lampoon everyone from Muslim fundamentalists to children, politicians and Catholic priests.

SEE ALSO: Charlie Hebdo runs religious extremism cartoon cover on anniversary of terror attack

Victims' families joined Hollande and other dignitaries near the building where Charlie Hebdo staff were holding an editorial meeting when two heavily armed brothers stormed in on Jan. 7, 2015, killing 11 people. The plaque begins: "To the memory of victims of the terrorist attack against freedom of expression."

They then paid homage to a police officer killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. Spray painted on the sidewalk was a message of support for the Muslim officer, reading "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag.

After the attacks, people around the world embraced the expression "Je suis Charlie" to express solidarity with the slain journalists, targeted for the paper's caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

Look back at the reaction to Charlie Hebdo's first issue released after the attacks:

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Charlie Hebdo - first issue since attack - sells out - out of stock
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French president honors Charlie Hebdo, kosher market victims

A sign which translates as 'Charlie Hebdo - Sold Out' is displayed outside a newsagents in Dunkirk on January 14, 2015 as the latest edition of French satirical weekly goes on sale. The latest edition of Charlie Hebdo since Islamist attacks on the magazines offices left 12 people dead, has sold out in many parts of France.

Photo credit: Philippe Huguen, AFP/Getty Images

A banner reading: " Stock shortage for Charlie Hebdo" is placed at a newsstand in Lille, northern France, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. In an emotional act of defiance, Charlie Hebdo resurrected its irreverent and often provocative newspaper, featuring a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover that drew immediate criticism and threats of more violence.

Photo Credit: Michel Spingler, AP Photo

A paper that reads: "No more Charlie Hebdo" is posted after all copies of the satirical newspaper were sold out at a newsstand in Paris Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. In an emotional act of defiance, Charlie Hebdo resurrected its irreverent and often provocative newspaper, featuring a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover that drew immediate criticism and threats of more violence.

Photo Credit: Christophe Ena, AP Photo

People wait outside a newsagents in Paris on January 14, 2015 as the latest edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo goes on sale. The latest edition of Charlie Hebdo since Islamist attacks on the magazines offices left 12 people dead, has sold out in many parts of France.

Photo Credit: Martin Bureau, AFP/Getty Images

People wait outside a newsagents in Bordeaux on January 14, 2015 as the latest edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo goes on sale. The latest edition of Charlie Hebdo since Islamist attacks on the magazines offices left 12 people dead, has sold out in many parts of France.

Photo Credit: Jean Pierre Muller, AFP/Getty Images

People wait outside a newsagents in Dunkirk on January 14, 2015 as the latest edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo goes on sale. The latest edition of Charlie Hebdo since Islamist attacks on the magazines offices left 12 people dead, has sold out in many parts of France.

Photo Credit: Philippe Huguen, AFP/Getty Images

People wait outside a newsagents in Dunkirk on January 14, 2015 as the latest edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo goes on sale. The latest edition of Charlie Hebdo since Islamist attacks on the magazines offices left 12 people dead, has sold out in many parts of France.

Photo Credit: Philippe Huguen, AFP/Getty Images

Members of the public queue at a newspaper kiosk, where copies of the latest edition of Charlie Hebdo magazine are being sold on January 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Three million copies of the controversial magazine have been printed in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks.

Photo Credit: Dan Kitwood, Getty Images

Parisians queue at a newspaper kiosk to get their copies of the latest edition of Charlie Hebdo magazine on January 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Three million copies of the controversial magazine have been printed in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks.

Photo Credit: Christopher Furlong, Getty Images

People observe a minute of silence at a 'Gathering of Solidarity and Remembrance with the People of France and Its Jewish Community' at the Adas Israel Congregation in Washington on January 13, 2015. The service was held in tribute to the 17 victims of last week's Islamist attacks in France, starting with the bloody shooting that killed 12 people at satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 7, followed by separate attacks, including on a kosher supermarket, that left five more people dead.

Photo Credit: Nicholas Kamm, AFP/Getty Images

Parisians queue at a newspaper kiosk to get their copies of the latest edition of Charlie Hebdo magazine on January 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Three million copies of the controversial magazine have been printed in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks.

Photo Credit: Christopher Furlong, Getty Images

Members of the public queue at a newspaper kiosk, where copies of the latest edition of Charlie Hebdo magazine are being sold on January 14, 2015 in Paris, France. Three million copies of the controversial magazine have been printed in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks.

Photo Credit: Dan Kitwood, Getty Images

Jean Paul Bierlein reads the latest issue of Charlie Hebdo outside a newsstand in Nice, southeastern France, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. In an emotional act of defiance, Charlie Hebdo resurrected its irreverent and often provocative newspaper, featuring a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover that drew immediate criticism and threats of more violence. The black letters on the front page read: "All is forgiven."

Photo Credit: Lionel Cironneau, AP Photo

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Hollande then paid homage to four people killed at a kosher supermarket in an attack that revived concerns about anti-Semitism in the country with Europe's largest Jewish community.

The French president briefly met with some of the survivors of the attack inside the supermarket, including Lassana Bathily, a Mali-born employee of market who hid a group of hostages in the store's underground stockroom. Bathily then sneaked out to speak to police and help the operation to free the 15 hostages and kill the attacker.

Bathily has been hailed as a hero and granted French citizenship.

He told Itele television he was there "to share the moment with families and friends of the victims and colleagues ... to show that we are here with our heart."

The Charlie Hebdo memorial plaque was hastily covered up after authorities discovered a spelling error in the name of slain cartoonist Georges Wolinski. The black covering was later removed, and a new plaque is being prepared after the embarrassing incident.

Hollande will unveil another plaque on Saturday to honor police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe, who was killed in the southern Paris suburb of Montrouge by one of the attackers on Jan. 8.

Charlie Hebdo's anniversary edition blames Islamic fundamentalists, organized religion, an irresolute government and intelligence failures for the 2015 violence in France.

The widow of a bodyguard killed at Charlie Hebdo said on RTL radio Tuesday that she wants an investigation into security measures at the paper. Ingrid Brinsolaro said her husband "saw dysfunctions" and a lack of security in the office and "it was impossible to do his job correctly in these conditions."

Wolinski's widow told France Info radio she "gets more and more angry" at security gaps. Marise Wolinski said the entrance of the office should have been "bunkerized."

Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said he was open to the idea of an investigation, but also defended the government's efforts to ensure security. Also speaking on RTL radio, he said authorities have dismantled 18 recruitment networks and arrested 11 groups planning attacks, and thwarted six attacks since last spring.

The country remains under a state of emergency after the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris that killed 130 people, and extra security was on hand for Tuesday's commemorations.

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Angela Charlton and Alex Turnbull contributed to this report.

See more from the commemoration and look back at life since the attacks:

France Pays Tribute to Charlie Hebdo, Jewish Shop Victims

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