Peru's shamans voice predictions for 2016

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Peru's Shamans Voice Predictions for 2016


Peruvian shamans don't have good news for Europe in 2016.

Gathering to perform a ritual at their end of year ceremony, shamans danced and played instruments to predict the year ahead.

Blowing into an instrument that looks like a shell called a "pututu", they gathered around photographs of world leaders and forecasted more attacks to hit Europe in 2016.

"In France and in other countries in Europe we see there will be attacks. There will be attacks, wrongful, unnecessary deaths, but there will be," Peruvian Shaman Juan Osco said.

See photos of the shamans:

13 PHOTOS
Peruvian Shamans
See Gallery
Peru's shamans voice predictions for 2016
Isabel Olaechea sits still as shamans perform a ritual at the "Mercado de Deseos" in Lima, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015. Olaechea is hoping the ceremony will help her earn enough money to buy a home in 2016. She paid about 20 US dollars for the rite at the Market of Wishes, which sets up for about a week at the end of the year. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Shamans performs a new year ritual for Juan Carlos Silva, sitting, at the "Mercado de Deseos" in Lima, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015. Silva paid about 20 US dollars for the ritual at the Market of Wishes that sets up for about a week during the holidays. Silva said he returns to the market every December, asking shamans to bestow luck on him in the areas of health, money and love for the next year. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Isabel Olaechea holds a fake two dollar bill during a shaman ritual at the "Mercado de Deseos" in Lima, Peru, Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015. Olaechea is hoping the ritual will help her earn enough money to buy a home in 2016. She paid about 20 US dollars for the ritual at the Market of Wishes, which sets up for about a week at the end of the year. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Shamans hold up a statue of baby Jesus, or "El Nino" in Spanish, as they play drums and maracas during a ritual asking for protection from the natural phenomenon known as El Nino, on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. Peruvian sailors named the formation El Ninoâthe (Christ) Childâbecause it was most noticeable around Christmas. Every few years, the winds shift and the water in the Pacific Ocean gets warmer than usual. That water sloshes back and forth around the equator in the Pacific, interacts with the winds above and then changes weather worldwide. In Peru, they've already declared a pre-emptive emergency to prepare for devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
In this Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015 photo, Shamans hold up a statue of baby Jesus, or "El Nino" in Spanish, as they play drums and maracas during a ritual asking for protection from the natural phenomenon known as El Nino, on the outskirts of Lima, Peru. Peruvian sailors named the formation El Ninoâthe (Christ) Childâbecause it was most noticeable around Christmas. Every few years, the winds shift and the water in the Pacific Ocean gets warmer than usual. That water sloshes back and forth around the equator in the Pacific, interacts with the winds above and then changes weather worldwide. In Peru, they've already declared a pre-emptive emergency to prepare for devastating flooding. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
Peruvian shamans perform a good luck ritual using a doll representing Argentina's soccer player Lionel Messi outside the National Stadium in Lima, Peru, Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Soccer fans around the world are gearing up to watch the World Cup soccer tournament that kicks off Thursday in Brazil. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
With coca leaves in his hands and dressed in full regalia, peruvian shaman Augusto de la Cruz performs a good luck ritual for the 2014 new year at the beach in Lima, Monday, Dec. 30, 2013.(AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
A shaman, right, performs a new year's ritual to bring good luck to her client for the coming year, at the Market of Wishes in Lima, Peru, Monday, Dec. 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
A shaman makes a mariage ritual for Valentine's day at Agua Dulce, a local beach of Lima on February 12, 2010. AFP PHOTO/ Ernesto Benavides (Photo credit should read AFP PHOTO/AFP/Getty Images)
A Peruvian shaman makes a ritual of predictions for the 2012 US election, at San Cristobal hill in Lima, on November 05, 2012. AFP PHOTO/ ERNESTO BENAVIDES (Photo credit should read ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images)
A shaman makes a mariage ritual for Valentine's day at Agua Dulce, a local beach of Lima on February 12, 2010. AFP PHOTO/ Ernesto Benavides (Photo credit should read AFP PHOTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Peruvian shaman Juan Osco (R) makes a ritual of predictions for the new year, by throwing coca leaves over a picture of US President Barack Obama at San Cristobal Hill in Lima, on December 28, 2009. AFP PHOTO/Ernesto Benavides. (Photo credit should read ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Shamans also predicted that Republican candidate Donald Trump will go up against the power of the people in his attempt to become the next American president.

"We see that statements of Donald Trump are controversial, he will be about to become an official candidate or maybe president but the people of the United States will join forces and he will not be elected," said Peruvian Shaman Juan Osco.

Prayers and predictions of the shamans have become highly regarded in their native Peru.

More from AOL.com:
App differentiates a baby's crying sounds
The most dangerous cities to drive in this holiday season
It will be illegal to smoke in Hawaii if you're under 21

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners