A possible cure for sugar cravings

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A Possible Cure for Sugar Cravings


Researchers have made one sweet discovery. Scientists have been able to identify a hormone which suppresses the sweet tooth.

You know that insatiable feeling where you need something sweet or you're going to die? Well, it just met its match. The hormone FGF21 is produced in the liver, and it may be the answer to all of our problems.

Scientist say the hormone is created in a response to high carbohydrate levels. Then it enters the blood stream where it tells your brain to stop craving sweets. Scientist now know that the hormone decreases appetite and intake of sugar.

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A possible cure for sugar cravings

Plain Greek yogurt

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Almond Butter

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Pistachios

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Hard Boiled Eggs

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Walnuts

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Apricots

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Cottage cheese

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Turkey jerky

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Kale Chips

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Bananas

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Strawberries

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Edamame

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Grapes

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Pumpkin seeds

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Dark chocolate

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They tested the idea out in mice, and the ones that were injected with FGF21 ate seven times less sugar. The mice they genetically modified not to have the hormone -- they ate a lot more sugar.

They say these findings will be really helpful to people with diabetes. But, FGF21 does not block the graving of complex carbs, like cake or pastries.

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