Donald Trump launches vulgar attack against Hillary Clinton

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Trump: Where Did Hillary Go?

GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan — Donald Trump launched a vulgar attack on Hillary Clinton late Monday, including a sexually derogatory comment about her being "schlonged" by President Barack Obama in 2008.

"Even her race to Obama, she was gonna beat Obama," the GOP frontrunner told a rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan. "I don't know who would be worse, I don't know. How does it get worse? But she was gonna beat — she was favored to win — and she got schlonged. She lost."

Trump also made crude references to Clinton's bathroom break during Saturday's Democratic debate, describing it as "disgusting."

"What happened to her?" Trump wondered. "I'm watching the debate, and she disappeared." He then solved his own riddle: "I know where she went. It's disgusting. I don't want to talk about it. No, it's too disgusting. Don't say it, it's disgusting. We want to be very straight up, OK?"

To see more of Donald Trump on the campaign trail, scroll through the gallery below:

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Donald Trump at Iowa high school
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Donald Trump launches vulgar attack against Hillary Clinton
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump waves as he takes the stage during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Children climb on a sculpture as Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump waves at the end of a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump high-fives homecoming king Austin Cook as queen Eylse Pescott, left, looks on during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Urbandale High School, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in Urbandale, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
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It wasn't the first time Trump used the term "schlonged." In 2011, while discussing the race for New York's 26th District, Trump characterized the loss suffered by Republican Jane Corwin as "not only" a loss but an instance of getting "schlonged by a Democrat."

Trump also launched vitriolic attacks on his Republican competitors. He described Jeb Bush's candidacy as "sad," telling the Michigan audience that Bush's family is "ashamed" of his standing and candidacy — not the first time he's made that claim.

Lindsey Graham's decision to leave the race was also met with indifference from Trump. The two sparred frequently, Graham often punching up at Trump as his campaign struggled to gain traction in a field whose message is often controlled by Trump's controversial statement.

Related:Lindsey Graham Ends Republican Presidential Bid

"Sad," Trump said of the news with a faux-frown on his face before reminding the crowd how "nasty" Graham had been to Trump over the past few months.

And while Trump lobbed punches at his opponents, he also dodged over a dozen interruptions from protesters assembled throughout the crowd.

The protesters have become a somewhat expected presence at Trump's rallies, with causes ranging from Black Lives Matter to immigration to protests about his racist rhetoric. Monday's rally, however, marked the most interruptions from protesters so far — beating out the previous record holding rally in Raleigh, N.C.,which boasted 10 interruptions.

Trump's reaction to the protest ranged from urging calm, to joking that he liked them because it forced the cameras to show the crowd, to finally calling the protesters "a bunch of losers" before commanding security to "get them out."

Seeming to presume that the protesters were all Democrats, Trump then posited that Republicans should've been protesting for the last seven or eight years of Obama. "Why didn't we do it? OK. Say what you want about them. But we should've been doing it, we don't do that."

Of course, Obama has been interrupted by protesters in several venues, including a State of the Union address.

Days after pushing back on allegations that Russian President Vladmir Putin has killed journalists, Donald Trump assured a rally here that despite his hatred of the press, he would "never kill them."

Trump assured that he "would never kill" journalists. He then sarcastically added: "Uhh, let's see," pausing as if to think if there would be circumstances under which his unequivocal "never" would change.

As the crowd laughed and turned their eyes to the media, Trump became serious once more: "No I wouldn't. I would never kill them, but I do hate them. And some of them are such lying, disgusting people, it's true."

Related:There's No Proof Putin Killed Journalists, Trump Says

Moments later Trump referenced a group of photographers who were taking pictures of him as having "just come out of the cage," a reference to the media area designated for press at his events.

Many in the audience cheered in support, laughing along with Trump's wink and nod on the subject while turning to face the press pen in the center of the arena.

Linda and Tim Dykstra were among them, telling NBC News after the event "that was just a complete joke. He loves the media, you guys." Linda added: "Just a little verbal lash. He's not coming for ya."

For more on the 2016 GOP candidates, scroll through the gallery below:

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Donald Trump launches vulgar attack against Hillary Clinton
AMES, IA - JULY 18:  Republican presidential hopeful and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee fields questions at The Family Leadership Summit at Stephens Auditorium on July 18, 2015 in Ames, Iowa. According to the organizers the purpose of The Family Leadership Summit is to inspire, motivate, and educate conservatives.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Jeb Bush, former governor of Florida and Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate, speaks to the media following a campaign stop outside a residence in Washington, Iowa, U.S., on Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Bush, Marco Rubio, and Rand Paul are leading the Republican pack as most electable against Democrat Hillary Clinton in three swing states, according to a new poll with provocative implications for the crowded GOP primary. (Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
AYR, SCOTLAND - JULY 30:  Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump visits his Scottish golf course Turnberry on July 30, 2015 in Ayr, Scotland. Donald Trump will answer questions from the media at a press conference where reporters will be limited to questions just about golf.  (Photo by Jan Kruger/Getty Images)
AMES, IA - JULY 18:  Republican presidential hopeful Senator Ted Cruz of Texas fields questions at The Family Leadership Summit at Stephens Auditorium on July 18, 2015 in Ames, Iowa. According to the organizers the purpose of The Family Leadership Summit is to inspire, motivate, and educate conservatives.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Ben Carson, Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidate, pauses while speaking during The Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, July 18, 2015. The sponsor, The FAMiLY LEADER, is a "pro-family, pro-marriage, pro-life organization which champions the principle that God is the ultimate leader of the family." (Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
AMES, IA - JULY 18:  Republican presidential candidate Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker fields questions at The Family Leadership Summit at Stephens Auditorium on July 18, 2015 in Ames, Iowa. According to the organizers, the purpose of The Family Leadership Summit is to inspire, motivate, and educate conservatives.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, speaks during the Faith and Freedom Coalition's "Road to Majority" conference in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, June 19, 2015. The annual Faith & Freedom Coalition Policy Conference gives top-tier presidential contenders as well as long shots a chance to compete for the large evangelical Christian base in the crowded Republican primary contest. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
John Kasich, governor of Ohio, speaks while announcing he will seek the 2016 Republican presidential nomination in Columbus, Ohio, U.S., on Tuesday, July 21, 2015. Kasich, seeking to emerge from a crowded Republican presidential field as a practical and compassionate leader from a must-win swing state, is joins 15 other Republicans who have declared their candidacies. (Photo by Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 01:  U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) does a live interview with ABC News in the Russell Senate Office Building rotunda on Capitol Hill June 1, 2015 in Washington, DC. In protest of the National Security Agency's sweeping program to collect U.S. citizens' telephone metadata, Paul blocked an extension of some parts of the USA PATRIOT Act, allowing them to lapse at 12:01 a.m. Monday. The Senate will continue to work to restore the lapsed authorities by amending a House version of the bill and getting it to President Obama later this week.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senator Marco Rubio, a Republican from Florida and 2016 U.S. presidential candidate, waits to begin a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, July 23, 2015. Senator Bob Corker, a key player in the congressional debate over the nuclear deal with Iran, told Secretary of State John Kerry that the Obama administration is engaging in hyperbole to sell it. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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