5 things that changed the world in 2015

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More than 135 million people have been born since the clock struck midnight on January 1, 2015. Another 50 million have died. Paris was shaken by a horrifying terror attack and the 2016 race for the White House was shaken up by a candidate most experts scoffed at on the day he announced. Cuba and the United States began restoring relations for the first time in decades, Greece became embroiled in an epic financial debt crisis and a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake took nearly 9,000 lives in Nepal, China, India and Bangladesh.

Here's a look at the people, actions, and moments that changed the world this year.

ISIS/Daesh:

The terror group that calls itself the Islamic State first rose to infamy in 2014 after releasing a series of increasingly disturbing and gruesome videos of members violently murdering captives. Now known interchangeably as ISIS (the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria), ISIL (the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant) and most recently Daesh (an acronym for the Arabic name al-Dawla al-Islamiya al-Iraq al-Sham) -- it has become the new face of terror with its violent and extreme attempts to establish a caliphate.

Inside what life is like under ISIS rule:
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What life looks like under ISIS rule, Islamic State
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5 things that changed the world in 2015
FILE - This undated file image posted on a militant website on Jan. 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows fighters from the al-Qaida linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) marching in Raqqa, Syria. slamic State militants are barricading down for a possible assault on their de facto capital Raqqa, hiding among civilian homes and preventing anyone from fleeing, as international airstrikes intensify on the Syrian city in the wake of the Paris attacks. For many, the threat of missiles and bombs from the enemies of Islamic State is more of an immediate threat than the vicious oppression of the jihadisâ themselves. (AP Photo/Militant Website, File)
In this photo released on May 4, 2015, by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, Islamic State militants pass by a convoy in Tel Abyad town, northeast Syria. In contrast to the failures of the Iraqi army, in Syria Kurdish fighters are on the march against the Islamic State group, capturing towns and villages in an oil-rich swath of the country's northeast in recent days, under the cover of U.S.-led airstrikes. (Militant website via AP)
This undated file image posted on a militant website on Jan. 4, 2014, which is consistent with other AP reporting, shows Shakir Waheib, a senior member of the al-Qaida breakaway group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), left, next to a burning police vehicle in Iraq's Anbar Province. For the al-Qaida breakaway group that overran parts of Iraq this week, the border between that country and Syria, where it is also fighting, may as well not even be there. The group, wants to establish a Shariah-ruled mini-state bridging both countries, in effect uniting a Sunni heartland across the center of the Mideast.
This file image posted on a militant website on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, which is consistent with AP reporting, shows a convoy of vehicles and fighters from the al-Qaida-linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) fighters in Iraq's Anbar Province. The Islamic State was originally al-Qaida's branch in Iraq, but it used Syria's civil war to vault into something more powerful. It defied orders from al-Qaida's central command and expanded its operations into Syria, ostensibly to fight to topple Assad. But it has turned mainly to conquering territory for itself, often battling other rebels who stand in the way. (AP Photo/militant website, File)
This undated file image posted on a militant website on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows fighters from the al-Qaida linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) marching in Raqqa, Syria. Moderate Syrian rebels are buckling under the onslaught of the radical al-Qaida breakaway group that has swept over large parts of Iraq and Syria. Some rebels are giving up the fight, crippled by lack of weapons and frustrated with the power of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Other, more hard-line Syrian fighters are bending to the winds and joining the radicals. (AP Photo/Militant Website, File)
FILE - This image posted on a militant website on Saturday, June 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, appears to show militants from the Islamic State group with truckloads of captured Iraqi soldiers after taking over a base in Tikrit. Iraq won the battle to retake the city of Tikrit from the Islamic State group, backed by a coalition of the unlikely in Iranian advisers, Shiite militias and U.S.-led airstrikes, but the country now faces what could be its most important battle: Winning the support of the Sunni. (AP Photo via militant website, File)
This undated file image posted on a militant website on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014 shows fighters from the al-Qaida linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) marching in Raqqa, Syria. Once a vibrant, mixed city considered a bastion of support for President Bashar Assad, the eastern city of Raqqa is now a shell of its former life, transformed by al-Qaida militants into the nucleus of the terror group's version of an Islamic caliphate they hope one day to establish in Syria and Iraq. In rare interviews with The Associated Press, residents and activists in Raqqa describe a city where fear prevails, music has been banned, Christians have to pay religious tax in return for protection and face-veiled women and pistol-wielding men in jihadi uniforms patrol the streets. (AP Photo/militant website, File)
In this May 26, 2015 photo, Bilal Abdullah poses for a portrait in the village of Eski Mosul in northern Iraq, nearly a year after Islamic State militants took over the village. In the Islamic State's realm, a document testifying that one has "repented" from a heretical past must be carried at all times and it can mean the difference between life and death. Abdullah learned that not long after the extremists took over his home village. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this Wednesday, May 27, 2015 photo, a girl holds a broom in the town of Eski Mosul, Iraq, which had been under the control of the Islamic State group for months. Most residents stayed in the town after it was liberated by Kurdish Peshmerga forces in January 2015. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this photo released on March 7, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of the Islamic State group holds the IS flag as he dismantles a cross on the top of a church in Mosul, Iraq. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Feb. 8, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of Islamic State group's traffic police, right, writes a ticket to a driver, left, in Raqqa, Syria. Taxi drivers or motorists usually play the IS station on their radios - music, which is forbidden, can get the driver 10 lashes. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on May 4, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, people stand at the window of a media distribution point to receive CDs from Islamic State militants, right, in Mosul, Iraq. (Militant website via AP)
In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 photo, Sheikh Abdullah Ibrahim poses with his son while holding an Islamic State group-issued death certificate - all that he has left of his wife, Buthaina Ibrahim, an outspoken human rights activist and official, in the village of Eski Mosul, northern Iraq. There is no grave, no idea what was done with her body after the extremists took her from their home one night and killed her in a purge after overrunning the village north of Mosul, Iraq in June 2014. Given her government ties, IS fighters quickly demanded she apply for a repentance card. "She said she'd never stoop so low," her husband said. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this photo released on April 30, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, new recruits of the Islamic State train in Mosul, northern Iraq. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Dec. 24, 2014 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of the Islamic State group writes in Arabic, "we are a people whom God has honored with Islam," on a newly painted wall in Raqqa, Syria. (Militant website via AP)
In this Wednesday, May 27, 2015 photo, a resident sits on a hill overlooking the town of Eski Mosul, Iraq. The hole next to him is a former grave that was opened up by the Islamic State group militants and used as a sniper hideout. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this photo released on July 2, 2014 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, Iraqi men gather around Islamic State group officials to sign cards testifying that they have "repented" from their heretical past, in Mosul, northern Iraq. In a series of interviews by Associated Press journalists, former prisoners and residents who lived under IS rule describe how one of the richest, most sophisticated terrorist organizations in the world accumulates money, terrifies residents, indoctrinates children and buys loyalties. (Militant website via AP)
In this Wednesday, May 27, 2015 photo, Salim Ahmed, a former Iraqi Army member, holds the "repentance card" he received from the Islamic State group in June 2014 shortly after the militants took over his home village of Eski Mosul in northern Iraq. The document is part of the apparatus of control the Islamic State group has constructed across its self-declared "caliphate," the territory it conquered in Syria and Iraq. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
In this photo released on May 14, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of the Islamic State group's vice police known as "Hisba," right, reads a verdict handed down by an Islamic court sentencing many they accused of adultery to lashing, in Raqqa City, Syria. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Jan. 14, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, Islamic State militants kill a man they accused of being a homosexual by throwing him off a building in Syria's northeastern province of Hassakeh. In a series of interviews by Associated Press journalists, former prisoners and residents who lived under IS rule describe how one of the richest, most sophisticated terrorist organizations in the world accumulates money, terrifies residents, indoctrinates children and buys loyalties. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on March 7, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of the Islamic State group destroys an icon of the Virgin Mary and Jesus on the wall of a church in Mosul, Iraq. In a series of interviews by Associated Press journalists, former prisoners and residents who lived under IS rule describe how one of the richest, most sophisticated terrorist organizations in the world accumulates money, terrifies residents, indoctrinates children and buys loyalties. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Jan. 31, 2014 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, women in niqabs - enveloping black robes and veils that leaves only the eyes visible - sew niqabs, which are required for women in Islamic State-held territory, in a factory in Mosul, Iraq. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Feb. 10, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, two Syrian citizens, right, sit in the office of an inheritance judge of Islamic State group, in the town of al-Tabqa in Raqqa City, Syria. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on April 17, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, a member of the Islamic State group's vice police known as "Hisba," patrols a market in Raqqa City, Syria. The Arabic words on the vest read, "The Islamic State - Hisba (vice police)." (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on Feb. 10, 2015 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, two women sit in the office of an Islamic State group judge, center, at an Islamic court in al-Tabqa town in Raqqa City, Syria. (Militant website via AP)
In this photo released on January 31, 2014 by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, members of the Islamic State group, left, distribute niqabs, enveloping black robes and veils that leave only the eyes visible, to Iraqi women in Mosul, northern Iraq. In areas controlled by the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria, women must not only be covered, but usually are required to wear all black, with flat-soled shoes; for men, Western clothes or hair styles _even hair gel _ can draw suspicion. (Militant website via AP)
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While the group has lost many members and territory gains this year thanks in part to nearly 10,000 U.S.-led airstrikes in Syria and Iraq, ISIS has continued to alarm citizens and politicians far beyond its borders with a series of attacks. The group claimed responsibility for organizing and planning the Paris attacks of Nov. 13 that took more than 100 lives. While it does not claim to have masterminded the December shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., leaders say the killers were supporters, and officials believe they were radicalized jihadists.

With its powerful use of social media and aggressive recruitment techniques, fighting and shutting down the terror organization will pose a continuing challenge to the U.S. in 2016 and possibly beyond.

Donald Trump:

Trump has been a household name for years, for his wealth, his buildings and his reality show -- but the real estate mogul became a powerful force in the Republican party in 2015 and now has a significant chance of becoming the next president of the United States. Having flirted with a run for president in the past, the majority of political pundits scoffed when Trump hinted he might run. His bombastic and brash announcement on June 16 drew similar initial reactions from election experts, who claimed his rambling style and politically incorrect comments about immigrants would sink his campaign before it even began.

Donald Trump and some of his biggest supporters on his campaign trail:
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Donald Trump's biggest fans
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5 things that changed the world in 2015
BURLINGTON, IA - OCTOBER 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets guests after speaking at a campaign rally at Burlington Memorial Auditorium on October 21, 2015 in Burlington, Iowa. Trump leads most polls in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Fourteen-year-old supporters Kaylie Kilpatrick (C) and her friend James Hanna (L) pose dress like Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Sumter, South Carolina, February 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
MOBILE, AL- AUGUST 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters after his rally at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on August 21, 2015 in Mobile, Alabama. The Trump campaign moved tonight's rally to a larger stadium to accommodate demand. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
Audience members cheer as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump signs autographs at a campaign event Sunday, Feb. 21, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Patrolman James Pittman poses for a selfie with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign stop at police headquarters in Manchester, N.H., Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
A man with a wig dressed like Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump takes a photo of himself before Trump arrives at a campaign event in Tampa, Fla., Monday, March 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A member of the audience cheers as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
TOPSHOT - A protester (C) is surrounded by Trump supporters as he tries to disrupt a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on March 13, 2016 in Boca Raton, Florida. Primary voters head to the polls on March 15th in Florida. / AFP / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump gets a fist bump from supporters during a rally at Radford University in Radford, Va., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
MYRTLE BEACH, SC - FEBRUARY 19: Supporters wait for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to speak at a rally February 19, 2016 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Trump is campaigning throughout South Carolina ahead of the state's primary. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
Liberty University students, Austin Miller, of Salisbury N.C., left, James Ford, of Elkton Md., second from left, Jeremy Boyd, of New York City, center, Josian O'Boyle, of Toronto Canada, second from right, and Cody Hildebrand, of Fayetteville W.Va., pose for photos with their home made t-shirts as they wait for a speech by Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., Monday, Jan. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds up a child he pulled from the crowd as he arrives to speak at a campaign rally in New Orleans, Friday, March 4, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rubs the shoulders of Alex Stypik, as Stypik shows off his T-shirt during a rally Sunday, March 13, 2016, in Bloomington, Ill. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign rally, Friday, Dec. 11, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump attracts autograph seekers during a rally at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Miss., on Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016. (John Fitzhugh/Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 14: Thousands of people line up at the Richmond International Raceway to get into a political rally with presidential candidate and Republican front-runner Donald Trump October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. A New York real estate mogul and reality television star, Trump is now in a statistical tie with retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in a Fox News survey of likely Republican voters released Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds up a cap that he signed for a supporter during a rally at the Expo Hall of the Richmond International Raceway on October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOWELL, MA - JANUARY 4: Robin Roy reacts to Republican candidate for President Donald Trump meeting spectators after a rally in Lowell, Massachusetts on Monday evening January 4, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Shane Hague waits for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to speak at a campaign stop, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Portsmouth, N.H. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Supporters hold up campaign signs, and a Trump coloring book, prior to an address by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign stop at the Tsongas Center in Lowell, Mass., Monday, Jan. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 14: Supporters cheer as presidential candidate and Republican front-runner Donald Trump takes the stage during a campaign rally at the Richmond International Raceway October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. A New York real estate mogul and reality television star, Trump is now in a statistical tie with retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in a Fox News survey of likely Republican voters released Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supporters react as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Saturday, Dec. 5, 2015, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
BILOXI, MS - JANUARY 02: Supporters of the Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump try to get autographs after his appearance at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum on January 2, 2016 in Biloxi, Mississippi. Trump, who has strong support from Southern voters, spoke to thousands in the small Mississippi city on the Gulf of Mexico. Trump continues to split the GOP establishment with his populist and controversial views on immigration, muslims and some of his recent comments on women. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NORFOLK, VA - OCTOBER 31: Donald Trump supporters cheer for the Republican presidential while he speaks at a rally in front of the USS Wisconsin on October 31, 2015 in Norfolk, Virginia. . With just 93 days before the Iowa caucuses Republican hopefuls are trying to shore up support amongst the party. (Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)
NORTH CHARLESTON, SC - SEPTEMBER 23: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks before the Greater Charleston Business Alliance, which supports minority businesses and is affiliated with the South Carolina African American Chamber of Commerce on September 23, 2015 in North Charleston, South Carolina. The candidate shook hands and signed autographs after the event. (Photos by Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Holly Griffin, 8, of Atlanta, wears a hat in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump while waiting for Trump to arrive for a campaign rally at Dorton Arena in Raleigh, N.C., Friday, Dec. 4, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
NORFOLK, VA - OCTOBER 31: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump motions to the media at a rally in front of the USS Wisconsin on October 31, 2015 in Norfolk, Virginia. . With just 93 days before the Iowa caucuses Republican hopefuls are trying to shore up support amongst the party. (Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump invites Myriam Witcher 35 on the stage during a campaign rally at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino on October 8, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada (Photo by Isaac Brekken/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump poses for a photo with Iowa State fans before an NCAA college football game between Iowa State and Iowa, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015, in Ames, Iowa. (Rodney White/The Des Moines Register via AP) 
BOULDER, CO - OCTOBER 28: Andy Dean, a spin room surrogate for Donald Trump, wears a hat with Trumps signature outside the spin room before Republican Presidential Debate Your Money, Your Vote sponsored by CNBC at the University of Colorado in Boulder, October 28, 2015. The event will be moderated by network anchors Carl Quintanilla and Becky Quick and chief Washington correspondent John Harwood. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wave banners during a rally at the Expo Hall of the Richmond International Raceway on October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Trump supporters hold up a sign reading 'We Are The 68%' before Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump's rally, December 14, 2015 at the Westgate Hotel & Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada. A recent USA Today poll shows 68% of Trump supporters would follow him if he left the GOP to make a third party run for the presidency. Trump will face off with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson and six other main stage candidates at tomorrow's GOP debate, hosted by CNN. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK / AFP / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 14: Charlotte Browning (C) and Lois Lang (2nd R) bought wigs to look like their favorite candidate, Republican front-runner Donald Trump, while lining up with thousands of others for a campaign rally at the Richmond International Raceway October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. A New York real estate mogul and reality television star, Trump is now in a statistical tie with retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in a Fox News survey of likely Republican voters released Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, center, stops to take a photograph with Jim Tranz, of Port Charlotte, Fla., as he walks with a crowd during the final round of play at The Barclays golf tournament Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, in Edison, N.J. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 28: A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump listens to Trump give a speech outlining his vision for tax reform at his skyscraper on Fifth Avenue on September 28, 2015 in New York City. Under the plan there would be four tax categories, with people earning less than $25,000 per year paying 0% tax. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
BURLINGTON, IA - OCTOBER 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets guests after speaking at a campaign rally at Burlington Memorial Auditorium on October 21, 2015 in Burlington, Iowa. Trump leads most polls in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
The crowd cheers when Republican presidential candidate businessman Donald Trump speaks during a campaign pep rally, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, in Mobile, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
A woman shows excitement when meeting Republican presidential candidate businessman Donald Trump during a campaign pep rally, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, in Mobile, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
A supporter for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump listens during a campaign rally, Saturday, Dec. 5, 2015, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Laci Lamb, 6, of Lucedale, Miss., looks at a sign before Republican presidential candidate businessman Donald Trump speaks at a campaign pep rally, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, in Mobile, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Supporters Kathleen Hastings, left, and Elizabeth Musngi, right, cheers Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he speaks during a campaign rally held at the North Atlanta Trade Center, Saturday, Oct., 10, 2015, in Norcross, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis)
Tammy Pickett is illuminated by her cell phone as she listens to a speech by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the National Federation of Republican Assemblies on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
A young girl listens as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers his message during a campaign rally at the state fair in Oklahoma City, Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
Supporters cheer Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally held at the North Atlanta Trade Center, Saturday, Oct., 10, 2015, in Norcross, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis)
MOBILE, AL- AUGUST 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters after his rally at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on August 21, 2015 in Mobile, Alabama. The Trump campaign moved tonight's rally to a larger stadium to accommodate demand. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters after speaking at a campaign rally, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Mesa, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Ruth Hindal, left, shows Ann Thomas, both of Des Moines, Iowa, a shirt for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump before his arrival at a rally, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump listen to him speak before a crowd of 3,500 Saturday, July 11, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
RICHMOND, VA - OCTOBER 14: A young woman wears a Donald Trump t-shirt as thousands of people line up at the Richmond International Raceway to get into a political rally with presidential candidate and Republican front-runner Donald Trump October 14, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. A New York real estate mogul and reality television star, Trump is now in a statistical tie with retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson in a Fox News survey of likely Republican voters released Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump greets supporters as he arrives to speak during a Tea Party rally against the international nuclear agreement with Iran outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, September 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - DECEMBER 14: A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waits for the start of a campaign rally at the Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino on December 14, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Donlad Trump is campaigning in Las Vegas a day ahead of the final GOP debate. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Attendees try to take a photograph of Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, red cap, at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. Billionaire Republican 2016 contender Donald Trump said this week unlike rivals such as Jeb Bush, he wouldn't be beholden to big-money campaign donors if elected president. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
GRAND RAPIDS, MI - DECEMBER 21: Jeanne Contanch (L) and Shelly Kumfer wait for the start of a campaign event with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on December 21, 2015 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Trump continues to lead the most polls in the race for the Republican nomination for president. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 11: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses supporters during a political rally at the Phoenix Convention Center on July 11, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona. Trump spoke about illegal immigration and other topics in front of an estimated crowd of 4,200. (Photo by Charlie Leight/Getty Images)
Supporters reach to great Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump as he leaves a brief stop to speak to supporters and the media in Laredo, Texas, Thursday, July 23, 2015. Trump predicted Hispanics would love him, because as president he said he'd grab jobs back from overseas and give more opportunity to those who live in the U.S. legally. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump whispers to James âCooperâ Skinner, 9, of Woodbridge, Va., while he lifts hi up to the microphone to ask a question during a campaign rally at the Prince William County Fair Ground in Manassas, Va., Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Donald Trump, president and chief executive officer of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, takes a selfie photograph with guests after an interview on Bloomberg Television's 'With All Due Respect' in the lobby of the Trump Tower in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015. Trump said that he agrees the carried interest tax 'loophole' should be eliminated and that it is 'tremendous burden' on country's finances. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer during a campaign rally Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015 at Robarts Arena in Sarasota, Fla. Speaking before thousands who jammed into the arena, Trump said he's "killing everybody" in polls nationally and in early voting states. (AP Photo/Steve Nesius)
Attendee Lucy Weatherwax Chalmers from Palm Springs, California, places her hand over her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance at a Tea Party Patriots rally against the Iran nuclear deal on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. A revolt among U.S. House Republicans delayed action on the Iran nuclear deal today as some members insisted they aren't bound by a Sept. 17 deadline in their efforts to kill the agreement. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a campaign pep rally, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, in Mobile, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
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That mantra has been repeated ad nauseam in the ensuing months, as increasingly divisive comments began emerging from his mouth -- but despite what the so-called experts expected, Trump has managed to hold a solid lead over many rivals. Cruz has become the latest candidate to rival his numbers in some polling -- especially in Iowa where he's taken a lead -- but Trump continues to resonate with a significant number of both likely Republican voters and independent voters.

While it remains to be seen if he will become president, or even win his party's nomination. His successful six-month run as the top polling candidate has allowed Trump to successfully change the conversation around the race for the White House in the Republican Party.

Caitlyn Jenner:

It is rare, if not unheard of, that two reality TV stars could truly change the world, but for reasons far different than Donald Trump, Caitlyn Jenner managed to do that this year.

Jenner became an American athletic icon in 1976 by winning a gold medal in the decathlon at the Olympics in Montreal, appearing on Wheaties boxes as Bruce. Thirty years later, Jenner became a reality TV fixture as a member of the Kardashian clan, but it was her decision to publicly announce that she was a trans woman that turned her into an activist. Google searches for the term "transgender" skyrocketed after Jenner's closely-watched TV special with Diane Sawyer.

See Jenner's transformation since the 1976 Olympics:
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Bruce Jenner, Caitlyn Jenner through the years
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5 things that changed the world in 2015
Glamour's "The Transgender Champion" honoree, Caitlyn Jenner, attends the 25th Annual Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Carnegie Hall on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Jul 1976: Bruce Jenner of the USA celebrates during his record setting performance in the decathlon in the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. Mandatory Credit: Tony Duffy /Allsport
Bruce Jenner (Photo by: NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
NBC Sportscasters -- Pictured: Bruce Jenner -- (Photo by: NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner starts his upward climb in the pole vault during the final day's competition on Thursday, April 24, 1975 in the decathlon at the 66th drake relays in Des Moines, Iowa. Olympian Jenner, third going into the final five events, took the lead after nine events and capture the title with 8139 points - best scored recorded in the world this season. Jenner represents the San Jose stars. (AP Photo)
1976 Olympic Games, Montreal, Canada, Men's Decathlon, USA's gold medal winner Bruce Jenner (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
CANADA - JULY 30: Leader of the pack: Not succumbing to the temptation to run an easy 1;500 metres; the decathlon gold medal being already assured; Bruce Jenner of the United States strides out in front yesterday on his way to 4:12.81 clocking; excellent for a participant in 10-event combination. His total of 8;618 points broke world record he set earlier this year. In 10 events he achieved 4 career bests; tied one. (Photo by Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
American decathlon gold medalist Bruce Jenner is shown throwing the javelin in Olympic competition in Montreal, July 30, 1976. (AP Photo)
Bruce Jenner (U.S. decathlon Gold Medalist) shown receiving Gold decathlon medal at the XXI Olympic held in Montreal, July 30, 1976, from July17-August 1. Jenner won the decathlon. He is from San Jose. Ca. (AP Photo)
Bruce Jenner and Linda Thompson during Muscular Dystrophy Benefit at Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)
SAN JOSE, CA - MAY 25: Charlie Jones (left), Bruce Jenner (center, with child), and Ahmad Rashad commentate for television during the Bruce Jenner Bud Light Classic track meet held on May 25, 1985 at San Jose City College in San Jose, California. (Photo by David Madison/Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner during Las Hadas Sweet Sixteen Celebrity Sports Invitational at Las Hadas, Mexico in Las Hadas, Mexico, Mexico. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
Bruce Jenner and Kris Kardashian (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
LOS ANGELES - 1991: Kris Jenner and Bruce Jenner pose for a portrait in 1991 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Donaldson Collection/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - 1991: (Middle row, L-R) Brody Jenner, Kourtney Kardashian, Bruce Jenner, Kris Jenner, Cassandra Jenner, Kim Kardashian, (top row, L-R) Brandon Jenner, Burton Jenner,(bottom row, L-R) Robert Kardashian, Jr., Khloe Kardashian of the celebrity Jenner and Kardashian families featured in the TV show 'Keeping Up With The Kardashians' pose for a family portrait in 1991 in Los Angeles, California . (Photo by Maureen Donaldson/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
SAN JOSE, CA - MAY 25: Bruce Jenner watches the action during the 1991 Bruce Jenner track meet held at San Jose City College in San Jose, California on May 25, 1991. (Photo by David Madison/Getty Images)
Kris Kardashian and Bruce Jenner during 1995 Jim Thorpe Pro Sports Awards at Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
Kris Kardashian, Bruce Jenner and Kendall Jenner (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
Former Olympic champion Bruce Jenner speaks June 11, 2001 during the 2001 Service to America Awards Presentation Ceremony in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner during 16th Cedars-Sinai Sports Spectacular at Century Plaza Hotel in Century City, California, United States. (Photo by J. P. Aussenard/WireImage)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - DECEMBER 12: Kris Jenner and Bruce Jenner attend the world premiere of 'Ali' on December 12, 2001 at Grauman Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
Bruce Jenner during 2003 Celebrity Sports Invitational Ski Event in Squaw Valley at Resort at Squaw Creek in Lake Tahoe, California, United States. (Photo by A. Nevader/WireImage for InStyle Magazine)
BEL AIR, CA - MARCH 13: Olympian Bruce Jenner attends 'The 22nd Annual Jimmy Stewart Relay Marathon And Family Expo Kickoff' at the Hotel Bel Air on March 13, 2003 in Bel Air, California. (Photo by Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD - APRIL 11: Olympian Bruce Jenner and his family attend the film premiere of 'Holes' at the El Capitan Theater on April 11, 2003 in Hollywood, California. The film opens in theaters nationwide on April 18, 2003. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner during 'Along Came Polly' Premiere at Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, California, United States. (Photo by SGranitz/WireImage)
Bruce Jenner and Brody Jenner during 2005 ESPY Awards - Red Carpet at Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California, United States. (Photo by M. Caulfield/WireImage)
Bruce Jenner during Dream Foundation's 'A Day To Dream' - July 24, 2005 at Santa Barbara Zoo in Santa Barbara, California, United States. (Photo by Eric Isaacs/FilmMagic)
Bruce Jenner and family during E! Entertainment Television's 2005 Summer Splash Event - Arrivals at Tropicana at The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood, California, United States. (Photo by SGranitz/WireImage)
Bruce Jenner during Midsummer Night's Dream: A Magic Night of Poker - Arrivals at The Avalon in Hollywood, California, United States. (Photo by Jason Merritt/FilmMagic)
LOS ANGELES - OCTOBER 09: Bruce Jenner, Kim Kardashian and Kris Jenner at the 'Keeping Up With The Kardashians' premiere party on October 9, 2007 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jeff Vespa/WireImage)
TV personality Brody Jenner and father Bruce Jenner pose for the cameras at the 8th Annual Playboy Golf Scramble Championship Finals held at Industry Hills Golf Club at the Pacific Palms Conference Resort on March 28, 2008 in Industry Hills, California. (Photo by Michael Tran/FilmMagic)
LAS VEGAS - APRIL 05: TV personality Bruce Jenner arrives at the 44th annual Academy Of Country Music Awards held at the MGM Grand on April 5, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 05: Bruce Jenner sighting on July 5, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jean Baptiste Lacroix/WireImage)
WESTLAKE VILLAGE, CA - OCTOBER 24: Television personality Bruce Jenner arrives at the Stand Up For Kids Annual Dinner and Auction on October 24, 2009 in Westlake Village, California. (Photo by Michael Bezjian/WireImage)
DAYTONA BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 13: Olympic Gold Medalist Bruce Jenner at Daytona International Speedway on February 13, 2010 in Daytona Beach, Florida. (Photo by Kevin Kane/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 07: (L-R) TV personalities Kim Kardashian, Bruce Jenner and Kris Jenner attend the Bravada International launch party hosted by Kardashian at The Whisper Restaurant and Lounge at The Grove on April 7, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David Livingston/Getty Images)
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - NOVEMBER 11: TV personalities Kris Jenner (L) and Bruce Jenner attend the Endless Youth & Life store opening celebration on November 11, 2010 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by David Livingston/Getty Images)
BURBANK, CA - JUNE 10: Television personalities Bruce Jenner (L) and his wife Kris Jenner appear on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno at the NBC Studios on June 10, 2011 in Burbank, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Tonight Show/Getty Images for The Tonight Show)
TODAY -- Pictured: (l-r) Bruce Jenner and Hoda Kotb appear on NBC News' 'Today' show (Photo by Peter Kramer/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - SEPTEMBER 15: Bruce Jenner and Kris Jenner arrive at the Brent Shapiro Foundation: The Summer Spectacular on September 15, 2012 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images)
WATCH WHAT HAPPENS LIVE -- Episode 723 -- Pictured: Bruce Jenner -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner arrives at the Annual Charity Day hosted by Cantor Fitzgerald and BGC Partners, on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP)
LAS VEGAS - APRIL 4: Olympic gold medalist Bruce Jenner hits a tee shot during the first round of ARIA Resort & Casino's 12th annual Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational golf tournament at Shadow Creek on April 4, 2013 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational)
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 08: TV personalities Brody Jenner (L) and Bruce Jenner pose at the Brandon and Leah album release party for 'Cronies' on April 8, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Chelsea Lauren/WireImage)
BURBANK, CA - MAY 06: TV personality Bruce Jenner attends The 6th Annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic To Benefit The Lopez Foundation at Lakeside Golf Club on May 6, 2013 in Burbank, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for The Lopez Foundation)
LATE NIGHT WITH JIMMY FALLON -- Episode 845 -- Pictured: (l-r) Bruce Jenner with host Jimmy Fallon during an interview on June 4, 2013 -- (Photo by: Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Bruce Jenner arrives at the Annual Charity Day hosted by Cantor Fitzgerald and BGC Partners, on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP)
NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CA - NOVEMBER 11: Bruce Jenner arrives at the All Sports Film Festival closing ceremony at El Portal Theatre on November 11, 2013 in North Hollywood, California. (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)
Bruce Jenner arrives for Ryan Sheckler's 7th Annual Celebrity Golf Tournament at Trump National Golf Course on September 29, 2014 in Palos Verdes Estates, California. (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/Getty Images)
FILE - In this July 15, 2015 file photo, Caitlyn Jenner accepts the Arthur Ashe award for courage at the ESPY Awards at the Microsoft Theater, in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Gerald Rosenberg approved Jenner's name and gender change during a brief hearing in Santa Monica, Calif., on Friday, Sept. 25. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)
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She may still be cashing in on reality TV fame, but Jenner has also turned that fame and power into an opportunity to advocate for other trans people searching for acceptance.



Charleston church shooting:

When 21-year-old Dylann Roof opened fired in a church in Charleston, S.C., he killed nine people in a violent outburst that his own writings would later reveal was an attempt to start a race war.

What he instead did was inspire a moment of unity across South Carolina and many other places in the South, eventually setting off a chain of events that led to the removal of the Confederate Flag from state property, a feat others had attempted in vain for years.

Look back at how Charleston reacted and came together in the aftermath of the shooting:
45 PHOTOS
Charleston, SC shooting - memorials, aftermath
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5 things that changed the world in 2015
Barbara Lloyd, of Charleston, S.C., cries as she joins hands with mourners during the singing of "We Shall Overcome" at a memorial service for the victims of the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, Friday, June 19, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Angela Hines, left, comforts Auburn Sandstrom as she cries while visiting a sidewalk memorial in memory of the shooting victims in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., Saturday, June 20, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Dr. Dexter Easley preaches to a crowd gathered outside the Emanuel AME Church during a prayer service by the National Clergy Council, Saturday, June 20, 2015 in Charleston, S.C. Clergy from around the country led prayers and words of hope to the people in attendance. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
People que to lay flowers at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina on June 19, 2015. Police captured the white suspect in a gun massacre at one of the oldest black churches in the United States, the latest deadly assault to feed simmering racial tensions. Police detained 21-year-old Dylann Roof, shown wearing the flags of defunct white supremacist regimes in pictures taken from social media, after nine churchgoers were shot dead during bible study on June 17. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
People que to lay flowers at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina on June 19, 2015. Police captured the white suspect in a gun massacre at one of the oldest black churches in the United States, the latest deadly assault to feed simmering racial tensions. Police detained 21-year-old Dylann Roof, shown wearing the flags of defunct white supremacist regimes in pictures taken from social media, after nine churchgoers were shot dead during bible study on June 17. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Barbara Lloyd, of Charleston, S.C., cries during the singing of "We Shall Overcome" at a memorial service for the victims of the shooting at Emanuel AME Church, Friday, June 19, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
People attend a vigil at TD Arena for victims of the recent church shooting June 19, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. For someone reportedly bent on igniting a race war, Dylann Storm Roof had little to say for himself in the first of what will be many court appearances. The 21-year-old suspect in Wednesday night's massacre at an African-American church Bible study class spoke only to answer a judge's questions at a 14-minute bail hearing. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Police tape surrounds the parking lot behind the AME Emanuel Church as FBI forensic experts work the crime scene, Friday, June 19, 2015 in Charleston, S.C. Dylann Storm Roof, 21, is accused of killing nine people during a Wednesday night Bible study at the church. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Gary and Aurelia Washington, center left and right, the son and granddaughter of Ethel Lance who died in Wednesday's shooting, leave a sidewalk memorial in front of Emanuel AME Church comforted by fellow family members Thursday, June 18, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was arrested Thursday in the slayings of several people, including the pastor at a prayer meeting inside the historic black church. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 19: (L-R) Sisters Margaret Kerry, Mary Thecla and Kathleen Lang of the Order of the Daughters of St. Paul pray outside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church June 19, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley called for the death penalty for Dylann Storm Roof, 21, of Lexington, South Carolina, if he is found guilty of murdering nine people during a prayer meeting at the church Wednesday night. Among the dead is the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor of the church which, according to the National Park Service, is the oldest black congregation in America south of Baltimore. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A group of women pray together at a make-shift memorial on the sidewalk in front of the Emanuel AME Church, Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Charleston, S.C. Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was arrested Thursday in the slayings of several people, including the pastor at a prayer meeting inside the historic black church. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Olina Ortega, left, and Austin Gibbs light candles at a sidewalk memorial in front of Emanuel AME Church where people were killed by a white gunman Wednesday during a prayer meeting inside the historic black church in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Olina Ortega, left, and Austin Gibbs light candles at a sidewalk memorial in front of Emanuel AME Church where people were killed by a white gunman Wednesday during a prayer meeting inside the historic black church in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Rev. Sandy Drayton sheds a tear during a prayer vigil held at Morris Brown AME Church for the victims of Wednesday's shooting at Emanuel AME Church on Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Charleston, S.C. Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was arrested Thursday in the slayings of several people, including the pastor at a prayer meeting inside the historic black church.(Grace Beahm/The Post And Courier via AP, Pool)
State Senator Vincent Sheheen (D-Kershaw) gets emtional as he sits next to the draped desk of state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, Thursday, June 18, 2015, at the Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. Pinckney was one of those killed, Wednesday night in a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)
A man leans against a light pole as he visits a makeshift memorial down the street from where a white man opened fire Wednesday night during a prayer meeting inside Emanuel AME Church killing several people in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden, pauses while speaking in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 18, 2015, on the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., prior to his departure to Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 18: South Carolina State Senator Joel Lourie (L) comforts Gerald Malloy in the senate chambers June 18, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Legislators gathered Thursday morning to honor their co-worker Clementa Pinckney and the eight others killed yesterday at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Charleston police Lt. S. Siprko removes flowers from the backseat of a patrol car, Thursday, June 18, 2015 to a makeshift memorial in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. The alleged shooter, Dylann Storm Roof, 21, spent nearly an hour inside the church Wednesday night before killing six women and three men, then tried to outrun an all-night manhunt before a citizen in the next state spotted his car and tipped police, Charleston Police Chief Greg Mullen said. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
A unidentified man touches the Emanuel AME Church after placing flowers at a makeshift memorial on the sidewalk in Charleston, S.C., following a shooting Wednesday night in Charleston, S.C. Shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was captured without resistance in North Carolina Thursday after an all-night manhunt, Charleston's police chief Greg Mullen said. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Tyler Francis, right, and Shondrey Dear pray together, Thursday, June 18, 2015 at a makeshift memorial near the Emanuel AME Church following a shooting Wednesday night in Charleston, S.C. Shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was captured without resistance in North Carolina Thursday after an all-night manhunt, Charleston's police chief Greg Mullen said. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
A man holds up a sign after a vigil outside Morris Brown AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
An emotional Senate staffer Travis Norton, right, joins other staff members and members of Congress, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 18, 2015, during a vigil to mourn the shooting victims of Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)
People sit on the steps of Morris Brown AME Church while services are held June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People say a prayer outside Morris Brown AME Church during a vigil June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People sing 'We Shall Overcome' during a service at Morris Brown AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A parishioner has her bag checked by a sheriff's deputy before entering a prayer vigil at Morris Brown AME Church for the people killed Wednesday night during a prayer meeting inside Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Members of the Senate walk to the chambers before a session, Thursday, June 18, 2015, at the Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. State Sen. Clementa Pinckney was killed, Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in a shooting at an historic black church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)
The desk of S.C. Sen. Clementa Pinckney is draped in black cloth with a single rose and vase in an empty chamber prior to a Senate session, Thursday, June 18, 2015, at the Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. Pinckney was killed, Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in a shooting at an historic black church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)
Sandra Bridges lays a greeting card at a makeshift memorial down the street from where a white man opened fire Wednesday night during a prayer meeting inside a historic black church killing several people in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Kim Hamby, right, prays with her daughter Kayla 4, as they lay flowers at a makeshift memorial down the street from where a white man opened fire Wednesday night during a prayer meeting inside a historic black church killing several people in Charleston, S.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Noah Nicolaisen, of Charleston, S.C., kneels at a makeshift memorial down the street from where a white man opened fire Wednesday night during a prayer meeting inside the Emanuel AME Church killing several people in Charleston, Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
In this image taken from video on Thursday, June 18, 2015, Tarsha Moseley, left, Martha Watson, and Toby Smith pray at a makeshift memorial near Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. A white man opened fire during a prayer meeting inside the historic black church Wednesday night, killing several people. The shooter remained at large Thursday morning. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
In this image taken from video on Thursday, June 18, 2015, Martha Watson, left, and Tarsha Moseley embrace at a makeshift memorial near Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. A white man opened fire during a prayer meeting inside the historic black church Wednesday night, killing several people. The shooter remained at large Thursday morning. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
US Congressman Jeff Denham (C), R-California, prays with Senator Chris Coons (6th L), D-Deleware, Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee (5th L), D-Texas, Senator Chuck Grassley (4th L), R-Iowa, and Congressman Joe Wilson (3rd L), R-South Carolina, in front of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, during a moment of silence for the nine killed in a church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks about the shooting deaths of nine people at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina, from the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman places flowers at a makeshift memorial near the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People visit a makeshift memorial near the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US Congressman Jeff Denham (C), R-California, prays with Senator Chris Coons (2nd L), D-Deleware, and Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee (L), D-Texas, in front of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, during a moment of silence for the nine killed in a church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
People visit a makeshift memorial near the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays at a makeshift memorial near the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Chaplain James St. John, center, leads senators in prayer, Thursday, June 18, 2015, at the Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. State Sen. Clementa Pinckney was one of those killed Wednesday night in a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)
US Congressman Jeff Denham (R), R-California, holds hands with Senator Chris Coons (2nd R), D-Deleware, and Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee (C), D-Texas, as they stand with Senator Chuck Grassley (2nd L), R-Iowa, and Congressman Joe Wilson (L), R-South Carolina, in front of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, during a moment of silence for the nine killed in a church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 18: Members of the US House ofÊRepresentatives and members of the US Senate and staff gather in a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston South Carolina, June 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. Police have arrestedÊDylann Roof, 21, of Lexington, South Carolina in the shooting that killed 9 people. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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The debate over that flag has spread throughout the South since, with many other states and localities weighing in on the matter both positively and negatively. The flag's supporters have insisted it is a sign of heritage, and not hate, while opponents claim it is intrinsically linked to the racially-charged systems of slavery and segregation -- but the debate probably wouldn't have been happening in 2015 if not for the shooting.

Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision:

The highest court in the land often issues rulings that have small and tiny impacts on a handful of American citizens, but this year's landmark ruling in the Obergefell v. Hodges case impacted millions of lives in a single instance. The Court's 5-4 decision legalized same-sex marriage nationwide.

Supporters celebrated that "love has won," while opponents worked on plans to reverse the decision and protect religious freedom for those who reject the legitimacy of same-sex marriages on religious grounds. Few figures in that battle were as divisive as Kim Davis, an elected clerk from Kentucky who refused to issue marriage licenses to same sex couples in her jurisdiction despite state order, and eventually went to jail for her convictions.

Relive the celebration after the Supreme Court's decision was handed down:
36 PHOTOS
Supreme Court Legalizes Same-Sex Marriage, Gay Marriage, Marriage Equality
See Gallery
5 things that changed the world in 2015
People celebrate during a rally outside the Stonewall Tavern in the West Village in New York on June 26, 2015, after the US Supreme Court's historic decision on same sex marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled on June 26, that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Ikeita Cantu, left, and her wife Carmen Guzman, of McLean, Va., hold up signs as they celebrate outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. The couple was married in Canada in 2009 when gay marriage was illegal in Virginia. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A couple kiss to celebrate the US Supreme Court's historic decision on same sex marriage during a rally outside the Stonewall Tavern in the West Village in New York on June 26, 2015, after the US Supreme Court's historic decision on same sex marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled on June 26, that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Jim Obergefell, the named plaintiff in the Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court case that legalized same sex marriage nationwide, is backed by supporters of the courts ruling on same-sex marriage on the step of the Texas Capitol during a rally Monday, June 29, 2015, in Austin, Texas. The Supreme Court declared Friday that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN - Marriage equality supporters rally on the steps of the Supreme Court as they wait for a decision Friday, June 26, 2015, in Washington. (Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign)
People celebrates during a rally outside the Stonewall Tavern in the West Village in New York on June 26, 2015, after the US Supreme Court's historic decision on same sex marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled on June 26, that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Carlos McKnight of Washington, waves a flag in support of gay marriage outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015. A major opinion on gay marriage is among the remaining to be released before the term ends at the end of June. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of same-sex marriage celebrate outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Two women celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
People run under a giant equality flag as they celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 26: Same-sex marriage supporters from the Human Rights Campaign celebrate after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriages nationwide on Friday, June 26, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
People shout slogans as they celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
The crowd celebrates outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Barack Obama walks toward the podium before speaking in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have the right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 26: Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 26: Activists hold signs regarding same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
From left, Annie Katz of the University of Michigan, Zaria Cummings of Michigan State University, Spencer Perry of Berkeley, Calif., and Justin Maffett of Dartmouth University, celebrate outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015, after the court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Same-sex marriage supporters rejoice after the U.S Supreme Court hands down a ruling regarding same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
People shout slogans as they celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
The crowd reacts as the ruling on same-sex marriage was announced outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday June 26, 2015. The Supreme Court declared Friday that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Same-sex marriage supporters hold rainbow flags outside the U.S. Supreme Court June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
People wave a giant equality flag in celebration outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on June 26, 2015 after its historic decision on gay marriage. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation. The nation's highest court, in a narrow 5-4 decision, said the US Constitution requires all states to carry out and recognize marriage between people of the same sex. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Ariel Olah of Detroit, left, and her fiancee Katie Boatman, are overcome by emotion outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, as the ruling on same-sex marriage was announced. The court declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the US. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A man holds a rainbow flag in support of same-sex marriage outside the U.S. Supreme Court June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Carmelita Cabello, left, and her partner of 31 year, Jaque Roberts, right, arrive at the Travis County building for a marriage license after hearing the Supreme Court ruling that grants same-sex couples the right to marry nationwide, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Lupe Garcia, left, hugs her partner Cindy Stocking, right, at the Travis County building after hearing the Supreme Court ruling that grants same-sex couples the right to marry nationwide, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that gay couples nationwide have the right to marry in a 5-4 decision. How incredible it is to be here as they announced it!
It is now clear that the challenged laws burden the liberty of same-sex couples, and it must be further acknowledged that they abridge central precepts of equality . . . Especially against a long history of disapproval of their relationships, this denial to same-sex couples of the right to marry works a grave and continuing harm. #fbf #equality #lovemustwin #freedomtomarry
People are FREAKING OUT at the Stonewall Inn! Tears, hugs, laughter. http://t.co/bC1RUfEDzk
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN - Participants celebrate at the San Francisco Pride Parade on Sunday, June 28, 2015, in San Francisco, Calif., two days after the Supreme Court's landmark decision to require that states issue marriage licenses to same sex couples. (Adm Golub/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign)
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Marriage equality activists say their next battle lies in protecting adoption rights for couples, including those who aren't always married. Opponents, including some presidential candidates, are continuing to work on legal plans to reverse the ruling, with many arguing that the decision should belong to the states, which have held the power to regulate marriage in the past.
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