Camille Paglia takes on Taylor Swift, Hollywood's #GirlSquad culture

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Camille Paglia takes on Taylor Swift, Hollywood's #GirlSquad culture
Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards at the Barclay Center on Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013 in New York. (Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision/AP)
DETROIT, MI - MAY 30: Musician Taylor Swift (L) and model Gigi Hadid perform on stage during the 1989 World Tour Live at Ford Field on May 30, 2015 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Larry Busacca/LP5/Getty Images for TAS)
Zendaya, from left, Hailee Steinfeld, Taylor Swift, Lily Aldridge, and Martha Hunt arrive at the Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Sunday, May 17, 2015, in Las Vegas. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP)
Singer Taylor Swift, center, performs as model Karlie Kloss walks the runway at the Victoria's Secret fashion show in London, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014. (Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 16: Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez seen out on a sunny day in West Hollywood, California on June 16, 2015. Credit: John Misa/MediaPunch/IPX
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 22: Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez perform onstage during the 'Speak Now World Tour' at Madison Square Garden on November 22, 2011 in New York City. Taylor Swift wrapped up the North American leg of her SPEAK NOW WORLD TOUR with two sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden this week. In 2011, the tour played to capacity crowds in stadiums and arenas over 98 shows in 17 countries spanning three continents, and will continue in 2012 with shows Australia and New Zealand. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images)
DETROIT, MI - MAY 30: (L-R) Model Martha Hunt, musician Taylor Swift, and model Gigi Hadid perform on stage during the 1989 World Tour Live at Ford Field on May 30, 2015 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Larry Busacca/LP5/Getty Images for TAS)
NEW YORK - MAY 29: Taylor Swift, Gigi Hadid, and Martha Hunt seen May 29, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Josiah Kamau/BuzzFoto via Getty Images)
Taylor Swift and Gigi Hadid enjoy a Sunday afternoon hike together in LA, 10 May 2015. 11 May 2015. Vantage News/IPx
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 02: Taylor Swift, Martha Hunt and Karlie Kloss attend the after party for the annual Victoria's Secret fashion show at Earls Court on December 2, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: Model Martha Hunt (L) and recording artist Taylor Swift introduce a performance by Van Halen during the 2015 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 02: Taylor Swift performs as model Karlie Kloss walks the runway during the 2014 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show at Earl's Court Exhibition Centre on December 2, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Victoria's Secret)
Lorde, left, and Taylor Swift arrive at the 16th annual InStyle and Warner Bros. Golden Globes afterparty at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 23: (L-R) Actress Selena Gomez, singer Taylor Swift and model Karlie Kloss attend the 2014 American Music Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on November 23, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/AMA2014/Getty Images for DCP)
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - JANUARY 11: Actress/director Lena Dunham (L) and singer/songwriter Taylor Swift attend HBO's Official Golden Globe Awards After Party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 11, 2015 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 30: Selena Gomez and Taylor Swift arrives at the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on August 30, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 30: Taylor Swift (L) and Nicki Minaj perform onstage during the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards held at Microsoft Theater on August 30, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Tran/FilmMagic)
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - AUGUST 30: (Exclusive Coverage) Martha Hunt, Lily Aldridge, Selena Gomez, Taylor Swift, Hailee Steinfeld and Serayah McNeill attend the Republic Records VMA after party at Ysabel on August 30, 2015 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 30: (L-R) Model Gigi Hadid, model Martha Hunt, actress Hailee Steinfeld, actress Cara Delevingne, actress/singer Selena Gomez, recording artist Taylor Swift, actress Serayah, actress Mariska Hargitay, model Lily Aldridge and model Karlie Kloss attend the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on August 30, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 30: Taylor Swift and Kim Kardashian West attend the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on August 30, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/MTV1415/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 30: (L-R) Recording artist Taylor Swift, models Gigi Hadid, Karlie Kloss and Lily Aldridge attend the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on August 30, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 22: Singer-songwriters Taylor Swift (L) and Mary J. Blige perform onstage during Taylor Swift The 1989 World Tour Live In Los Angeles at Staples Center on August 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TAS)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 22: (L-R) Actor Matt Leblanc, singer-songwriter Taylor Swift, comedian Chris Rock and actor Sean O'Pry perform onstage during Taylor Swift The 1989 World Tour Live In Los Angeles at Staples Center on August 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TAS)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 19: Taylor Swift performs with Andreja Pejic and Lily Donaldson during The 1989 Tour at Soldier Field on July 19, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Daniel Boczarski/LP5/Getty Images for TAS)
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This story first appeared in the 2015 Women in Entertainment issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

Girl squads were a hashtag summer craze that may have staying power. Blogs and magazines featured intricate star charts of the constellations of celebrity gal pals clustering around Taylor Swift, Cameron Diaz, Lena Dunham or Tina Fey.

Names appearing on the shifting roster of girl squads include Drew Barrymore, Reese Witherspoon, Selena Gomez, Willow Smith, Kendall Jenner, Sofia Richie, Chloe Sevigny and Karlie Kloss. Hot models Gigi Hadid and Cara Delevingne bob and weave through several groups. Adele joined the club in November when she dined out in New York with Emma Stone and varsity squad player Jennifer Lawrence.

Gigi Hadid Defends Taylor Swift's Squad Goals


"Squad" as a pop term emerged from 1990s hip-hop (Hit Squad, Def Squad). It once had a hard, combative street edge, but today it's gone girly and a bit bourgeois. Social media are its primary engine. Perhaps the first star to use stylish Instagrams to advertise her tight female alliances was Rihanna, with moody snaps of herself and bestie Melissa Forde out and about in Los Angeles or lolling seaside on Barbados.

Do girl squads signal the blossoming of an ideal­istic new feminism, where empowering solidarity will replace mean-girl competitiveness? Hollywood has always shrewdly known that cat-fighting makes great box office. In classic films such as The Women, All About Eve, The Group and Valley of the Dolls, all-star female casts romped in claws-out bitchfests. That flamboyant, fur-flying formula remains vital today in Bravo TV's boffo Real Housewives series, with its avid global following.

A warmer model of female friendship was embodied in Aaron Spelling's blockbuster Charlie's Angels TV show, which was denounced by feminists as a "tits-and-ass" parade but was in fact an effervescent action-adventure showing smart, bold women working side by side in fruitful collaboration. A similar dynamic of affectionate intimacy animated HBO's Sex and the City, whose four feisty, mutually supportive professional women prefigured today's fun-loving but rawly ambitious girl squads.

The entertainment industry has seen feminist spurts come and go. Helen Reddy's 1972 smash hit "I Am Woman" became the worldwide anthem of second-wave feminism. In 1985, Aretha Franklin and Annie Lennox did the slamming duet "Sisters Are Doin' It for Themselves." The Spice Girls encapsulated sex-positive third-wave feminism with their 1997 manifesto Girl Power! Performing at the 2014 Video Music Awards, Beyonce flashed "FEMINIST" in giant letters behind her, but questions were raised about the appropriation of that word by a superstar whose career has always been managed by others, first her parents and now her domineering husband, Jay Z.

With gender issues like pay equity for women actors and writers coming increasingly to the fore, girl squads can be seen as a positive step toward expanding female power in Hollywood, where ownership has been overwhelm­ingly male since the silent film era. For all its dictatorial overcontrol, however, the early studio system also provided paternalistic protection and nurturance for young women under contract. Marilyn Monroe was a tragic victim of the slow breakdown of that system: The studio made her, but in the end it could not save her from callous predators, including the Kennedys.

Read More Jessica Chastain Pens Essay From Female-Helmed Movie Set: No One Feels "Left Out or Bullied"

Young women performers are now at the mercy of a swarming, intrusive paparazzi culture, intensified by the hypersexualization of our flesh-baring fashions. The girl squad phenomenon has certainly been magnified by how isolated and exposed young women feel in negotiating the piranha shoals of the industry. A dramatic example of their vulnerability was the long-lens pap photo of Swift sitting painfully sad and prim on a Virgin Islands taxi boat after her tumultuous 2013 holiday breakup with pop star Harry Styles.

Given the professional stakes, girl squads must not slide into a cozy, cliquish retreat from romantic fiascoes or communication problems with men, whom feminist rhetoric too often rashly stereotypes as oafish pigs. If many women feel lonely or overwhelmed these days, it's not due to male malice. Women have lost the natural solidarity and companionship they enjoyed for thousands of years in the preindustrial agrarian world, where multiple generations chatted through the day as they shared chores, cooking and child care.

In our wide-open modern era of independent careers, girl squads can help women advance if they avoid presenting a silly, regressive public image -; as in the tittering, tongues-out mugging of Swift's bear-hugging posse. Swift herself should retire that obnoxious Nazi Barbie routine of wheeling out friends and celebrities as performance props, an exhibitionistic overkill that Lara Marie Schoenhals brilliantly parodied in her scathing viral video "Please Welcome to the Stage."

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Girl squads ought to be about mentoring, exchanging advice and experience and launching exciting and innovative joint projects. Women need to study the immensely productive dynamic of male bonding in history. With their results-oriented teamwork, men largely have escaped the sexual jealousy, emotionalism and spiteful turf wars that sometimes dog women.

If women in Hollywood seek a broad audience, they must aim higher and transcend a narrow gender factionalism that thrives on grievance. Girl squads are only an early learning stage of female development. For women to leave a lasting mark on culture, they need to cut down on the socializing and focus like a laser on their own creative gifts.

Camille Paglia, 68, remains one of the world's leading cultural critics and is a frequent contributor to THR, where she has written about the intersection of pop culture, politics and religion. "Writing about Taylor Swift is a horrific ordeal for me because her twinkly persona is such a scary flashback to the fascist blondes who ruled the social scene during my youth," she says of analyzing the pop star and her entourage.

Read more essays from THR's Women in Entertainment issue:

Barbra Streisand on Hollywood's Double Standard: "What Does 'Difficult' Mean, Anyway?"

Jessica Chastain Pens Essay From Female-Helmed Movie Set: No One Feels "Left Out or Bullied"

Patricia Arquette: What Happened After My Oscar Speech on Pay Inequality (Guest Column)

Ellen Pao on How to Fix the Pay Gap: I Eliminated Salary Haggling at Reddit

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