'Nazi Bride' Beate Zschaepe breaks her silence at murder trial

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'Nazi Bride' Accused of Terrorist Activities Breaks Silence in Court

The woman accused of being a part of a neo-Nazi terrorist cell in Germany broke her silence in court.
Beate Zschaepe has been called the "Nazi Bride." Authorities say she's the only surviving member of the National Socialist Underground, a group accused of being involved in the deaths of 10 people, two bombings and 15 bank robberies.

Zschaepe said in a written statement she "was involved neither in the preparations, nor in the carrying out" of the killings but that she felt "morally guilty" about not being able to stop it.

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Beate Zschaepe, Germany's Nazi bride on trial for murder
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'Nazi Bride' Beate Zschaepe breaks her silence at murder trial
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: Beate Zschaepe, the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial waits for day 249 of the trial at the Oberlandgericht courthouse on December 9, 2015 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is scheduled to finally testify today via her lawyer and hence break her silence that she has so far maintained throughout the trial. She and four others are accused of assisting neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnardt and Uwe Mundlos in a killing spree over an eight-year period of nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: Beate Zschaepe (C), the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial greets her lawyers Hermann Borchert (L) and Mathias Grasel (R) just before the start of today's NSU neo-Nazi murders trial in Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on December 9, 2015. Zschaepe and her lawers have declared to testify in NSU Court Trial today. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting the dead NSU-members Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: Beate Zschaepe (right 3), the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial, greets her lawyer Mathias Grasel (R) and waits for the start of today's NSU neo-Nazi murders trial in Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on December 9, 2015. Zschaepe and her lawers have declared to testify in NSU Court Trial today. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting the dead NSU-members Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Defendant Beate Zschaepe and co-defendant Ralf Wohlleben (L) arrive for the continuation of their trial at a courtroom in Munich, southern Germany, December 9, 2015. The lone surviving suspect in a neo-Nazi murder case that shocked Germany plans to break her two-and-a-half-year silence and address all the allegations in court. Zschaepe is accused of helping found a neo-Nazi cell, the National Socialist Underground (NSU), and of complicity in the murders of eight Turks, a Greek and a German police woman across Germany between 2000 and 2007, as well as two bombings in immigrant areas of Cologne and 15 bank robberies. AFP PHOTO / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER / AFP / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER (Photo credit should read MICHAEL DALDER/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: Beate Zschaepe (C), the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial and her lawyers Mathias Grasel (R) and Hermann Borchert (L) wait for the start of today's NSU neo-Nazi murders trial in Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on December 9, 2015. Zschaepe and her lawers have declared to testify in NSU Court Trial today. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting the dead NSU-members Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: A box containing most probably the testify of Beate Zschaepe, the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial, seen just before the start of today's NSU neo-Nazi murders trial in Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on December 9, 2015. Zschaepe and her lawers have declared to testify in NSU Court Trial today. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting the dead NSU-members Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: Beate Zschaepe, the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial, sits with her lawyers Mathias Grasel (R) and Hermann Borchert and waits for day 249 of the trial at the Oberlandgericht courthouse on December 9, 2015 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is scheduled to finally testify today via her lawyer and hence break her silence that she has so far maintained throughout the trial. She and four others are accused of assisting neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnardt and Uwe Mundlos in a killing spree over an eight-year period of nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - DECEMBER 9: (EDITORS NOTE: Part of this image has been pixellated to obscure the identity of a defendant) Beate Zschaepe (2nd R), the main defendant in the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial, talks with her lawyers, Mathias Grasel (R-L), Hermann Borchert, Wolfgang Stahl, Wolfgang Heer und Anja Sturm and waits for day 249 of the trial at the Oberlandgericht courthouse on December 9, 2015 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is scheduled to finally testify today via her lawyer and hence break her silence that she has so far maintained throughout the trial. She and four others are accused of assisting neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnardt and Uwe Mundlos in a killing spree over an eight-year period of nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
Defendant Beate Zschaepe arrives for the continuation of her trial at a courtroom in Munich, southern Germany, December 8, 2015. Zschaepe is accused of helping found a neo-Nazi cell, the National Socialist Underground (NSU), and of complicity in the murders of 10 people, mostly ethnic Turks, from 2000 to 2007. AFP PHOTO / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER / AFP / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER (Photo credit should read MICHAEL DALDER/AFP/Getty Images)
Lawyer Mathias Grasel speaks with defendant Beate Zschaepe (L) before the continuation of her trial at a courtroom in Munich, southern Germany, December 8, 2015. Zschaepe is accused of helping found a neo-Nazi cell, the National Socialist Underground (NSU), and of complicity in the murders of 10 people, mostly ethnic Turks, from 2000 to 2007. AFP PHOTO / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER / AFP / POOL / MICHAEL DALDER (Photo credit should read MICHAEL DALDER/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 10: Co-defendant Beate Zschaepe arrives in court on the 244th day of NSU neo-Nazi murders trial at the Oberlandgericht Muenchen courthouse (Higher Regional Court) on November 10, 2015 in Munich, Germany. (Photo by Sebastian Widmann/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 10 : (L-R) Anja Sturm, Wolfgang Heer and Wolfgang Stahl, lawyers of Beate Zschaepe, wait in court on the 244th day of NSU neo-Nazi murders trial at the Oberlandgericht Muenchen courthouse (Higher Regional Court) on November 10, 2015 in Munich, Germany. (Photo by Sebastian Widmann/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 10: Federal prosecutors (Bundesanwaltschaft) with main federal prosecutor Herbert Diemer (L) arrive in court on the 244th day of the NSU-trial at the Oberlandgericht Muenchen courthouse on November 10, 2015 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe, after refusing to speak throughout the course of the trial, is to finally make a statement through her lawyer tomorrow. Zschaepe and four others are on trial for their roles in assisting neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnardt and Uwe Mundlos in a killing spree over a an eight-year period of nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images)
Defendant Beate Zschaepe talks with her lawyer Mathias Grasel as she waits for the continuation of her trial in a courtroom in Munich, southern Germany, November 10, 2015. Beate Zschaepe, alleged member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU) and charged with complicity in the murders of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek immigrant and a German policewoman between 2000 and 2007, intends to break her silence. As her lawyer Mathias Grasel announced on November 9, 2015, he will read a declaration of Zschaepe at the court in Munich on November 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / DPA / PETER KNEFFEL +++ GERMANY OUT +++ (Photo credit should read PETER KNEFFEL/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - JULY 28: The lawyers of Beate Zschaepe Anja Sturm (L-R), Wolfgang Heer, Wolfgang Stahl and her new lawyer Mathias Grasel wait for the continuation of the NSU neo-Nazi murders trial at the Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on July 28, 2015. (Photo by Sebastian Widmann /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - JULY 14: (EDITORS NOTE: Part of this image hasbeen pixellated to obscure the identity of the defendants) Co-defendant Beate Zschaepe's new lawyer Mathias Grasel (L-R) and her other lawyers Wolfgang Stahl, Anja Sturm and Wolfgang Heer wait for NSU neo-Nazi murders trial in Oberlandesgericht (Higher Regional Court) in Munich on July 14, 2015. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting Mundlos and Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
Defendant Beate Zschaepe (L), accused of being at the heart of neo-Nazi killer cell NSU, and her new lawyer Mathias Grasel (R) wait for the continuation of the trial on July 14, 2015 at the regional courthouse in Munich, southern Germany. Beate Zschaepe, alleged member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU), is charged with complicity in the murders of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek immigrant and a German policewoman between 2000 and 2007. AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOF STACHE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - APRIL 1: (EDITORS NOTE: The identity of one of the people in this image has been obscured at the request of the court.) Co-defendant Beate Zschaepe (C) waits for the start of 100th day of the NSU neo-Nazi murders trial on April 1, 2014 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting Mundlos and Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - APRIL 1: Co-defendant Beate Zschaepe arrives for the start of 100th day of the NSU neo-Nazi murders trial on April 1, 2014 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is the chief defendant among five people accused of assisting Mundlos and Boehnhardt in their eight-year murder spree that targeted nine immigrants and one policewoman. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
Beate Zschaepe, accused of being at the heart of neo-Nazi killer cell NSU, waits for the continuation of her trial on September 30, 2013 at the regional courthouse in Munich, southern Germany. Beate Zschaepe, alleged member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU), is charged with complicity in the murders of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek immigrant and a German policewoman between 2000 and 2007. AFP PHOTO/CHRISTOF STACHE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Beate Zschaepe, accused of being at the heart of neo-Nazi killer cell NSU, arrives for the continuation of her trial on September 5, 2013 at the regional courthouse in Munich, southern Germany. Beate Zschaepe, alleged member of the National Socialist Underground (NSU), is charged with complicity in the murders of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek immigrant and a German policewoman between 2000 and 2007. AFP PHOTO / POOL / MICHAELA REHLE (Photo credit should read MICHAELA REHLE/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - AUGUST 6: Beate Zschaepe goes in the court-hall for the start of day 39 of the NSU neo-Nazi murders trial at the Oberlandesgericht Muenchen courthouse on August 6, 2013 in Munich, Germany. Beate Zschaepe and four other defendants are on trial for their roles in the NSU neo-Nazi group, which claimed responsibility for the murder of nine immigrants and one police woman between 2000 and 2007. The trial is currently scheduled to last until December, 2014. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - AUGUST 6: (EDITOR'S NOTE: IMAGE WAS PIXELATED FOR LEGAL REASONS) Beate Zschaepe (m.), Andre E, Carsten S and Ralf Wohlleben (4th from r.) wait for the start of day 39 of the NSU neo-Nazi murders trial at the Oberlandesgericht Muenchen courthouse on August 6, 2013 in Munich, Germany. Beate Zschaepe and four other defendants are on trial for their roles in the NSU neo-Nazi group, which claimed responsibility for the murder of nine immigrants and one police woman between 2000 and 2007. The trial is currently scheduled to last until December, 2014. (Photo by Joerg Koch/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - MAY 15: Defendant Beate Zschaepe (C) arrives in the courtroom on day three of the NSU neo-Nazis murder trial at the Oberlandgericht Muenchen court on May 15, 2013 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is the main defendant and is on trial for her role in assisting Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos in the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman across Germany between 2000 and 2007. Together the trio called themselves the NSU, or National Socialist Underground. Four other co-defendants, including Ralf Wohlleben, Holder G., Carsten S. and Andre E., are accused of assisting the trio. Zschaepe has thus far remained silent and has refused to answer any questions by the court, including when asked to state her name. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - MAY 14: Defendant Beate Zschaepe arrives in court on the second day of the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial on May 14, 2013 in Munich, Germany. Zschaepe is the main defendant and is on trial for her role in assisting Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos in the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman across Germany between 2000 and 2007. Four other co-defendants, including Ralf Wohlleben, Holder G., Carsten S. and Andre E., are accused of assisting the trio. Zschaepe, Mundlos and Boehnhardt lived together for years undetected by police and called themselves the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. The case only came to light after Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide after the two were cornered by police following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Joerg Koch - Pool / Getty Images)
Co-defendant Ralf Wohlleben (C), former member of German farright party NPD, leaves the regional courthouse in Munich, southern Germany, on May 6, 2013 after the first day of the socalled NSU trial. Main defendant Beate Zschaepe is charged with complicity in the murders of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek immigrant and a German policewoman between 2000 and 2007 as a founding member and sole survivor of the far-right gang dubbed the National Socialist Underground (NSU). AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOF STACHE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - MAY 06: Demonstrators struggle with riot police outside the entrance to the courtroom at the Oberlandesgericht Muenchen court building on the first day of the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial on May 6, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant, Beate Zschaepe, is on trial for her role in assisting Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos in the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman across Germany between 2000 and 2007, and four other co-defendants, including Ralf Wohlleben, Holder G., Carsten S. and Andre E., are accused of assisting the trio. Zschaepe, Mundlos and Boehnhardt lived together for years undetected by police and called themselves the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. The case only came to light after Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide after the two were cornered by police following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - MAY 06: Demonstrators struggle with riot police outside the entrance to the courtroom at the Oberlandesgericht Muenchen court building on the first day of the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial on May 6, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant, Beate Zschaepe, is on trial for her role in assisting Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos in the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman across Germany between 2000 and 2007, and four other co-defendants, including Ralf Wohlleben, Holder G., Carsten S. and Andre E., are accused of assisting the trio. Zschaepe, Mundlos and Boehnhardt lived together for years undetected by police and called themselves the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. The case only came to light after Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide after the two were cornered by police following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - MAY 06: Demonstrators protest against the murders committed by the National Socialist Underground, or NSU, outside the Oberlandesgericht Muenchen state court on the first day of the NSU neo-Nazi murder trial on May 6, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant, Beate Zschaepe, is on trial for her role in assisting Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos in the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman across Germany between 2000 and 2007, and four other co-defendants, including Ralf Wohlleben, Holder G., Carsten S. and Andre E., are accused of assisting the trio. Zschaepe, Mundlos and Boehnhardt lived together for years undetected by police and called themselves the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. The case only came to light after Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide after the two were cornered by police following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - APRIL 13: Activists protesting against right-wing violence demonstrate in the city center five days ahead of the beginning of the NSU murder trial on April 13, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant in the trial is Beate Zschaepe, who lived for years together with Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt, the two men who in a cartoon video DVD took responsibility for the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman over an eight-year period and claimed to belong to an organization calling itself the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - APRIL 13: Activists protesting against right-wing violence demonstrate in the city center five days ahead of the beginning of the NSU murder trial on April 13, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant in the trial is Beate Zschaepe, who lived for years together with Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt, the two men who in a cartoon video DVD took responsibility for the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman over an eight-year period and claimed to belong to an organization calling itself the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
MUNICH, GERMANY - APRIL 13: Activists protesting against right-wing violence demonstrate in the city center five days ahead of the beginning of the NSU murder trial on April 13, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The main defendant in the trial is Beate Zschaepe, who lived for years together with Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt, the two men who in a cartoon video DVD took responsibility for the murder of nine immigrants and one policewoman over an eight-year period and claimed to belong to an organization calling itself the National Socialist Underground, or NSU. Mundlos and Boehnhardt committed suicide following a bank robbery in 2011. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 04: People participating in a demonstration to commemorate the victims of the NSU murder series march on the first anniversary of the exposure of the killers on November 4, 2012 in Berlin, Germany. One year ago Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt, after heisting a bank, committed suicide when police cornered them in the town of Eisenach. Investigators later discovered evidence linking the two men and their associate, Beate Zschaepe, to the murders of nine immigrants and one policewoman between 2000 and 2007 in what is the worst case of neo-Nazi crime in modern Germany history. A Bundestag investigative commission is still seeking answers to why German law enforcement agencies, ranging from local police to the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, pursued false assumptions in solving the crimes and failed to ever suspect the trio. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 09: (EDITOR'S NOTE: Best quality available). In this handout photo dated 2009 and provided by the German Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt) neo-Nazi Beate Zschaepe is shown at an undisclosed location. German investigators are appealing to the public for information about Zschaepe, as well as fellow neo-Nazis Uwe Boenhardt and Uwe Mundlos. The two men, who committed suicide in November following a bank robbery, are credited with a string of murders of foreigners and a policewoman between 2000 and 2007 and are thought to be part of an organization called the National Socialist Underground (NSU). (Photo Courtesy of the German Federal Criminal Police Office via Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 09: (EDITOR'S NOTE: Best quality available). In this handout photo dated 1990 and provided by the German Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt) neo-Nazi Beate Zschaepe is shown at an undisclosed location. German investigators are appealing to the public for information about Zschaepe, as well as fellow neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos. The two men, who committed suicide in November following a bank robbery, are credited with a string of murders of foreigners and a policewoman between 2000 and 2007 and are thought to be part of an organization called the National Socialist Underground (NSU). (Photo Courtesy of the German Federal Criminal Police Office via Getty Images)
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - DECEMBER 01: Neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnhardt, Uwe Mundlos and Beate Zschaepe are pictured under the text 'The Fedreal Criminal Office Asks For Your Help' in a poster with an appeal for help from the public by the Federal Criminal Office on December 1, 2011 in Karlsruhe, Germany. The two men, who committed suicide in November following a bank robbery, are credited with a string of murders of foreigners and a policewoman between 2000 and 2007 and are though to be part of an organization called the National Socialist Underground (NSU). Police have since arrested three possible accomplices and are investigating wehther there are more. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Getty Images)
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - DECEMBER 01: (EDITOR'S NOTE: Quality from source). Neo-Nazi Beate Zschaepe, who is currently in police custody, is pictured in this handout photo taken in 2011 and provided by the Federal Criminal Office on December 1, 2011 in Karlsruhe, Germany. German investigators are appealing to the public for information about Zschaepe, as well as fellow neo-Nazis Uwe Boehnhardt and Uwe Mundlos. The two men, who committed suicide in November following a bank robbery, are credited with a string of murders of foreigners and a policewoman between 2000 and 2007 and are though to be part of an organization called the National Socialist Underground (NSU). (Photo by Federal Criminal Office via Getty Images)
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - DECEMBER 01: A Polish RADOM VIS Model 35 9mm gun, one of the two weapons used by neo-Nazis Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Beonhart in a 2007 shooting in Heilbronn that killed policewoman Michele Kiesewetter, lies on display at a press conference given by investigators at the Federal Prosecutorâs Office on December 1, 2011 in Karlsruhe, Germany. Investigators have arrested three possible supporters of the neo-Nazi terrorist organization since the deaths of Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt several weeks ago and the revelation that the two men murdered 10 people, mostly Turkish small-business owners, between 2000 and 2007. A fourth suspect, Beate Zschaepe, who lived with Mundlos and Boehnhardt, is also in custody. Many German politicians are pressing for a prohibition of the right-wing NPD political party after the arrest of the most recent possible NSU supporter, Ralf Wohlleben, who was head of the NPD in Thuringia and is accused of supplying Mundlos and Boehnhardt with a gun and ammunition. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Getty Images)
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - DECEMBER 01: Photographers take photos of weapons found by police at the former residence as well as at a camper of neo-Nazis Uwe Mondlos and Uwe Boehnhardt during a press conference about ongoing criminal investigations of the National Socialist Underground (NSU) at the Federal Court of Justice on December 1, 2011 in Karlsruhe, Germany. Investigators have arrested three possible supporters of the neo-Nazi terrorist organization since the deaths of Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt several weeks ago and the revelation that the two men murdered 10 people, mostly Turkish small-business owners, between 2000 and 2007. A fourth suspect, Beate Zschaepe, who lived with Mundlos and Boehnhardt, is also in custody. Many German politicians are pressing for a prohibition of the right-wing NPD political party after the arrest of the most recent possible NSU supporter, Ralf Wohlleben, who was head of the NPD in Thuringia and is accused of supplying Mundlos and Boehnhardt with a gun and ammunition. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Getty Images)
KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - DECEMBER 01: The Ceska 83 7.65mm Browning, used in the so called 'Ceska murders' is presented during a press conference about ongoing criminal investigations of the National Socialist Underground (NSU) at the Federal Court of Justice on December 1, 2011 in Karlsruhe, Germany. Investigators have arrested three possible supporters of the neo-Nazi terrorist organization since the deaths of Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boehnhardt several weeks ago and the revelation that the two men murdered 10 people, mostly Turkish small-business owners, between 2000 and 2007. A fourth suspect, Beate Zschaepe, who lived with Mundlos and Boehnhardt, is also in custody. Many German politicians are pressing for a prohibition of the right-wing NPD political party after the arrest of the most recent possible NSU supporter, Ralf Wohlleben, who was head of the NPD in Thuringia and is accused of supplying Mundlos and Boehnhardt with a gun and ammunition. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Getty Images)
ZWICKAU, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 13: A police car stands in front of the burnt-out remains of the apartment that was once the residence of NSU murder trio Uwe Mundlos, Uwe Boehnhardt and Beate Zschaepe on November 13, 2011 in Zwickau, Germany. The bodies of Boehnhardt and Mundlos were found in a burnt-out caravan last week in Eisenach after the men reportedly robbed a bank, were pursued by police and committed suicide. Zschaepe turned herself in after detonating an explosive in the Zwickau apartment. Police investigators have found a treasure trove of evidence in the remains of the apartment that indicate the men murdered policewoman Michele Kiesewetter in Heilbronn 2007 as well as ten mostly Turkish small-business owners across Germany between 2000 and 2006. Police also found home-made DVDs that show the men were responsible for a bombing in an immigrant-heavy neighborhood in Cologne in 2004 that injured 22 people. Mundlos, Boehnhardt and Zschaepe were all active members of a neo-Nazi group called the ÃThueringer Heimatschutzà until they disappeared by changing their identities in 1998 following a police raid that uncovered explosives and pipe bombs. Lawmakers have announced plans to launch hearings into the case in order to uncover why law enforcement officers failed to connect the crimes earlier and why the three accused were released after the raid in 1998. (Photo by Marco Prosch/Getty Images)
ZWICKAU, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 13: A view of the burnt-out remains of the apartment that was once the residence of NSU murder trio Uwe Mundlos, Uwe Boehnhardt and Beate Zschaepe on November 13, 2011 in Zwickau, Germany. The bodies of Boehnhardt and Mundlos were found in a burnt-out caravan last week in Eisenach after the men reportedly robbed a bank, were pursued by police and committed suicide. Zschaepe turned herself in after detonating an explosive in the Zwickau apartment. Police investigators have found a treasure trove of evidence in the remains of the apartment that indicate the men murdered policewoman Michele Kiesewetter in Heilbronn 2007 as well as ten mostly Turkish small-business owners across Germany between 2000 and 2006. Police also found home-made DVDs that show the men were responsible for a bombing in an immigrant-heavy neighborhood in Cologne in 2004 that injured 22 people. Mundlos, Boehnhardt and Zschaepe were all active members of a neo-Nazi group called the ÃThueringer Heimatschutzà until they disappeared by changing their identities in 1998 following a police raid that uncovered explosives and pipe bombs. Lawmakers have announced plans to launch hearings into the case in order to uncover why law enforcement officers failed to connect the crimes earlier and why the three accused were released after the raid in 1998. (Photo by Marco Prosch/Getty Images)
ZWICKAU, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 13: A view of the burnt-out remains of the apartment that was once the residence of NSU murder trio Uwe Mundlos, Uwe Boehnhardt and Beate Zschaepe on November 13, 2011 in Zwickau, Germany. The bodies of Boehnhardt and Mundlos were found in a burnt-out caravan last week in Eisenach after the men reportedly robbed a bank, were pursued by police and committed suicide. Zschaepe turned herself in after detonating an explosive in the Zwickau apartment. Police investigators have found a treasure trove of evidence in the remains of the apartment that indicate the men murdered policewoman Michele Kiesewetter in Heilbronn 2007 as well as ten mostly Turkish small-business owners across Germany between 2000 and 2006. Police also found home-made DVDs that show the men were responsible for a bombing in an immigrant-heavy neighborhood in Cologne in 2004 that injured 22 people. Mundlos, Boehnhardt and Zschaepe were all active members of a neo-Nazi group called the ÃThueringer Heimatschutzà until they disappeared by changing their identities in 1998 following a police raid that uncovered explosives and pipe bombs. Lawmakers have announced plans to launch hearings into the case in order to uncover why law enforcement officers failed to connect the crimes earlier and why the three accused were released after the raid in 1998. (Photo by Marco Prosch/Getty Images)
ZWICKAU, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 13: A view of the burnt-out remains of the apartment that was once the residence of NSU murder trio Uwe Mundlos, Uwe Boehnhardt and Beate Zschaepe on November 13, 2011 in Zwickau, Germany. The bodies of Boehnhardt and Mundlos were found in a burnt-out caravan last week in Eisenach after the men reportedly robbed a bank, were pursued by police and committed suicide. Zschaepe turned herself in after detonating an explosive in the Zwickau apartment. Police investigators have found a treasure trove of evidence in the remains of the apartment that indicate the men murdered policewoman Michele Kiesewetter in Heilbronn 2007 as well as ten mostly Turkish small-business owners across Germany between 2000 and 2006. Police also found home-made DVDs that show the men were responsible for a bombing in an immigrant-heavy neighborhood in Cologne in 2004 that injured 22 people. Mundlos, Boehnhardt and Zschaepe were all active members of a neo-Nazi group called the ÃThueringer Heimatschutzà until they disappeared by changing their identities in 1998 following a police raid that uncovered explosives and pipe bombs. Lawmakers have announced plans to launch hearings into the case in order to uncover why law enforcement officers failed to connect the crimes earlier and why the three accused were released after the raid in 1998. (Photo by Marco Prosch/Getty Images)
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The case has been a controversial one for German authorities. Police initially believed the killings were carried out by migrant criminal gangs.

Officials were unaware of the of the neo-Nazi group until they found a gun linked to the killings at the scene of a double suicide involving two of the group's members.

Zschaepe said she felt like she couldn't leave the group and was financially and emotionally dependent on the other members. If convicted, she could face a life sentence.

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