Science says people who exercise more, drink more

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Science Says People Who Exercise More, Drink More
Hitting the gym, then hitting the bar? Sounds counterproductive, but science says that's exactly what people are doing. Researchers at Penn State found the more people work out, the more they drink -- and we're not talking about water, Gatorade, or protein shakes.

One hundred and fifty people took part in the survey, filled out questionnaires, and recorded their eating habits on an app. It turns out, hard work at the gym didn't discourage people from potentially ruining their progress with some cocktails.

What could be the reasoning? Well, exercise makes you feel good -- it releases endorphins and gives you energy. Researchers think people drink after workouts to keep the party in their brains going a little longer.

The study doesn't say if people were choosing lower-calorie drinks either -- like regular beer over light beer -- or even those really low calorie diet beers. But if we had to guess we'd say they probably went for their preferred beverage of choice -- because what's the point of working so hard if you can't drink what you really want?

Fun fact -- these U.S. cities allow public drinking:
Cities that allow public drinking
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Science says people who exercise more, drink more

Las Vegas, Nevada

(photo credit: Shutterstock)

Savannah, Georgia

(photo credit: Getty Images) 

Hood River, Oregon

(Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Butte, Montana

(constantgardener via Getty Images)

Fredericksberg, Texas

(Photo Credit: Howdy, I'm H. Michael Karshis/Flickr)

Arlington, Texas

(photo credit: QuesterMark/Flickr)

Forth Worth, Texas

(photo credit: Shutterstock)

New Orleans, Louisiana

(photo credit: Getty Images)

Gulfport, Mississippi

(photo credit: PONCHO83/Flickr)

Indianapolis, Indiana

(Photo credit: Henryk Sadura)

Erie, Pennsylvania

(photo credit: catAsmith/Flickr)


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