32 Azeri workers die in fire on Caspian Sea oil platform

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Lenders Back Azeri Gas Project With European Focus

Thirty-two workers have been killed and 42 rescued from an offshore oil platform that caught fire in Azerbaijan-controlled waters in the Caspian Sea, the head of an independent committee said on Saturday.

Azeri state energy company SOCAR declined to comment.

"According to our information, 32 workers died, while 42 workers were rescued last night. ... The fire on the platform was finally extinguished," Mirvari Gakhramanly, head of Azerbaijan's Oil Workers' Rights Protection Committee, told Reuters.

SOCAR said on Friday that the fire had started after a gas pipeline on the platform was damaged in heavy wind. It said rescue attempts were being complicated by a severe storm.

One worker called a Reuters correspondent from the platform and said there were 84 people trapped there. The worker did not want to be named.

SOCAR also said on Friday that workers were missing after an accident at another offshore oil platform during the storm. A search and rescue operation was under way, it added.

Fourteen workers were killed in accidents on SOCAR's oil and gas platforms in 2014.

For more on offshore oil drilling controversies, scroll through the gallery below:
10 PHOTOS
Alaska offshore Arctic Shell drilling
See Gallery
32 Azeri workers die in fire on Caspian Sea oil platform
File - In this July 30, 2015 file photo, the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica heads up the Willamette River under protesters hanging from the St. Johns Bridge on its way to Alaska in Portland, Ore. Royal Dutch Shell will cease exploration in Arctic waters off Alaska's coast following disappointing results from an exploratory well backed by billions in investment and years of work. The announcement that came on Monday, Sept. 28, was a huge blow to Shell, which was counting on offshore drilling in Alaska to help it drive future revenue. Environmentalists, however, had tried repeatedly to block the project and welcomed the news. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
FILE - In this Monday, April 7, 2014 file photo, a flag bearing the company logo of Royal Dutch Shell, an Anglo-Dutch oil and gas company, flies outside the head office in The Hague, Netherlands. Royal Dutch Shell PLC, Europe's largest oil company by market value, said Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015 that fourth quarter net income fell 57 percent to $773 million and that it would cap spending this year in response to falling oil prices. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2015, file photo, Shell Oil Co. President Marvin Odum gestures while speaking to The Associated Press in Anchorage, Alaska. Royal Dutch Shell will cease exploration in Arctic waters off Alaska's coast following disappointing results from an exploratory well backed by billions in investment and years of work. Monday, Sept. 28, was Shell's final day to drill this year in petroleum-bearing rock under its federal permit. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica heads the Portland of Portland, at left, after it was blocked on its' way to Alaska by activists hanging from the St. Johns bridge in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
An activist who was hanging from the St. Johns Bridge in an effort to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska is hauled in by law enforcement after he was lowered from his position in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The Fennica left dry dock and made its way down the Willamette River toward the Pacific Ocean soon after authorities forced the demonstrators from the river and the St. Johns Bridge. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica heads back to the Portland of Portland, at left, after it was blocked on its way to Alaska by activists hanging from the St. Johns bridge in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. Environmental activists on St. Johns Bridge and kayakers on the Willamette River below have been blocking the icebreaker from heading to the Arctic for a drill operation. The icebreaker is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Activist kayakers wait as theThe Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica heads up the Willamette River on its way to Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica heads upriver in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast. Environmental activists on St. Johns Bridge and kayakers on the water below are trying to block the icebreaker from heading to the Arctic for a drill operation. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
Activists hang from the St. Johns bridge in an effort to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION



More from AOL.com:
Martin Shkreli won't cut individual Daraprim price after all
This the best Black Friday deal for shoe lovers
Taylor Swift maybe harmed a lot of birds making her latest music video

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners