See the giant 'monster rat' roaming around this Chinese university

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Dog-Sized Giant Rats Once Roamed Our Planet

This has a giant "NOPE" written all over it.

The terrifyingly large rodent was seen scurrying around corridors and rooftops at Wenzhou Medical University this past week.

The "monster rat" measured approximately one meter long (including tail), which equals out to about 3.3 feet. To put things into perspective, that's about the size of a toddler child. Terrifying!


According to News Australia, the monster rat has been identified as a "coypu," which is also known as a river rat or nutria. In fact, nutria have been spotted in 16 U.S. states as well, and are considered a "largely considered an invasive pest, due to its thumb-sized front teeth and strong claws."​

Thankfully, the rat was captured inside a cardboard box. Originally, rumors swirled that this giant rat was the result of an experiment gone wrong, but this is not the case. Wenzhou University professors think the animal could have been purchased online as a pet, and accidentally escaped.

We're not sure why you someone would want one of these rats, but Metro reports that these rat babies sell on Taobao, China's largest online trading website, for 900 RMB (which equals out to approximately $140).

The "monster rat" is currently being held by wildlife officials, and will soon be released back into the wild.

See photos of the Hutia, rodents that are kept as pets in Cuba:

8 PHOTOS
Hutia rodent pet Cuba
See Gallery
See the giant 'monster rat' roaming around this Chinese university
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Pancho, a domesticated hutia, confronts a camera, in Bainoa, Cuba. With their rope-like, dark tails, long front teeth, and whiskers that appear to be vibrating, hutias look like giant rats. They measure nearly a foot long (about 30 centimeters), with the largest ones weighing in bigger than a small dog. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Congui, a domesticated hutia, rides on the front door of an American classic car driven by its owner Rafael Lopez, in Bainoa, Cuba. Five years ago Lopez and his wife Ana Pedraza adopted Congui, their first pet hutia, a large rodent that lives in Cuba, Jamaica, Bahamas and some of the smaller Caribbean islands. More than a half-dozen more of the furry animals have been born at their home after occasionally bringing in a male hutia in to mate with Congui. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Rafael Lopez sticks out his tongue infused with rum for his pet hutia Pancho, in Bainoa, Cuba. While some hutias can be aggressive, the 50-year-old Lopez and his wife have found the huitias to be pleasant companions. Lopez, calls the hutia -- a precious, curious and very intelligent little animal.€ (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Ana Pedraza gives her pet hutia, Congui, a drink of coffee, in Bainoa, Cuba. Conqui and her brood like to drink coffee and munch on crackers, greens and root vegetables. Her son Pancho every once in a while likes a little nip of rum. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Rafael Lopez strokes his pet hutia Pancho, in Bainoa, Cuba. While some hutias can be aggressive, the 50-year-old musician and his wife have found the hutias to be pleasant companions. Lopez, calls the hutia -- a precious, curious and very intelligent little animal. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, one of Ana Pedraza's pet hutia, listens to her sing at their home in Bainoa, Cuba. Pedraza lives with her husband in a large home with a patio in this community about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the capital of Havana. They built a special cage for their pets after discovering that letting them loose only resulted in the destruction of telephone cables and furniture. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Nov. 17, 2014 photo, Ana Pedraza gives her pet hutia, Congui, a drink of coffee, in Bainoa, Cuba. Five years ago Pedraza and her husband Rafael Lopez, right center, adopted Congui, their first pet hutia, a large rodent that lives in Cuba, Jamaica, Bahamas and some of the smaller Caribbean islands. More than a half-dozen more of the furry animals have been born at their home after occasionally bringing in a male hutia in to mate with Congui. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

More from AOL.com:
A 68-year-old man just successfully sued Apple for deleting his honeymoon photos
'Adorable kingpin' is reportedly daughter of DEA agent
Prisoner with incredible story paints stunning art with Skittles candy

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners