Prisoner with incredible story paints stunning art with Skittles candy

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Prisoners Turning Away From Crime And Instead Painting Beautiful Murals

When you think of someone serving time in prison, you're probably not thinking of "arts and crafts." But, when times are tough, prisoners often turn to creative outlets to bring a little beauty and color to their lives behind bars.

SEE MORE: These brave souls stuck their arms through a hole and let a tattoo artist ink them

That's where Chris Wilson comes in. Wilson was born in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne in England, and moved to California with his family when he was 10. From there, things unfortunately fell apart and Wilson became involved in drugs and acquired a long rap sheet.



Wilson spent years in California's infamous San Quentin prison, before being deported to back England in 1998. Now on the outside, a reformed Wilson recalls his time in jail to Huck Magazine, and his story is truly fascinating.

Wilson, who at the time was in need of a positive direction, learned how to make paint tints by crushing materials they could scrounge up, like Skittles.



Using crushed up Skittles to extract the tints, and a piece of his hair and some plastic cutlery for a paint brush, you won't believe just how beautiful his works are.



Check out these beautiful photos of Mexico street painting:

12 PHOTOS
NTP: Mexico Painting the Town
See Gallery
Prisoner with incredible story paints stunning art with Skittles candy
Irving Trejo, of the artist collective Germen Crew, paints a section of a mural in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. The government-sponsered project is called Pachuca Paints Itself and aims to promote community teamwork. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Irving Trejo, of the artist collective Germen Crew, picks out a can of orange paint while working on a gigantic mural in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. The government-sponsered project is called Pachuca Paints Itself and aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Director of the artist collective Germen Crew, Enrique Gomez, who goes by MYBE, leans against a brightly painted wall in the Palmitas neighborhood, in Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. Gomez said, "We have painted 209 houses. Every color represents the soul of the neighborhood. It has been a community effort as each household has participated in some way." The project aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Hundreds of houses painted in bright colors in what organizers claim is Mexico's largest mural, is part of a government-sponsored project is called Pachuca Paints Itself, in the Palmitas neighborhood, in Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. Germen Crew is the artist collective responsible for painting the mural project. Director Enrique Gomez, who goes by MYBE, said the crew has painted 1,500 square meters with 20,000 liters of paint. The project aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Director of the artist collective Germen Crew, Enrique Gomez, who goes by MYBE, poses for a portrait in the Palmitas neighborhood, in Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. Gomez said, "We have painted 209 houses. Every color represents the soul of the neighborhood. It has been a community effort as each household has participated in some way." The project aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Blueprints and photos are displayed in the headquarters of the artist collective Germen Crew in Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. Germen Crew has been working for a year and two months to create what they claim is Mexico's largest mural. The creative collective has used 20,000 liters of paint on 209 houses. The project aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Irving Trejo, of the artist collective Germen Crew, paints a section of a mural in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Thursday, July 30, 2015. The Germen Crew artist collective responsible for the project, claims it is Mexico's largest mural. They have spent the last 14 months creating trust with the community, and working with residents to paint their homes with bright colorful designs. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Director of the artist collective Germen Crew, Enrique Gomez, who goes by MYBE, speaks with community members in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Hundreds of houses painted in bright colors in what organizers claim is Mexico's largest mural, in the Palmitas neighborhood, in Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. Germen Crew is the artist collective responsible for the mural project. Director Enrique Gomez, who goes by MYBE, said the crew has painted 1,500 square meters with 20,000 liters of paint. The project aims to bring the community together and rehabilitate the area. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
Carlos Duarte, right, of the artist collective Germen Crew, paints a section of a gigantic mural in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. German Crew is an artist collective responsible for the project and claims it is Mexico's largest mural. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
CORRECTS THE NAME OF THE ARTIST COLLECTIVE - Alfonso Santiago Reyes looks up at the newly painted facade of his home that is part of a government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself, in the Palmitas neighborhood of Pachuca, Mexico, Thursday, July 30, 2015. "The neighborhood looks better than before and the colors make people happy," said Reyes. The painters are from the artist collective Germen Crew. (AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

More from AOL.com:
Students are boycotting school lunch they say is 'worse than prison food'
Attention health nuts: you've been eating your avocados all wrong
Pastor goes to extreme lengths to protest LGBT rights law

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners