AP PHOTOS: Graffiti artists depict Paris' resilience

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AP PHOTOS: Graffiti artists depict Paris' resilience
In this photo taken on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2015 in Paris, a man walks past graffiti reading "I died for nothing". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Sunday Nov. 22, 2015 in Paris shows a drawing of a Marianne, symbol of the French Republic, crying and which hangs on the Place de la Republique. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Sunday Nov. 22, 2015 in Paris, a boy skates by a painted wall reading "Paris, i love you". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2015 in Paris, a man walks past graffiti reading at the top "Fed up". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2015 in Paris, a man walks past graffiti reading "Give me hate, I will turn it into love", center, and Love for Amour. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2015 in Paris, a woman walks past a poster and reading "Paris still standing". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Monday Nov. 23, 2015 in Paris, a child sits by a poster reading Paris city motto "Fluctuat Nec Mergitur", which means "Tossed but not sunk". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Monday Nov. 23, 2015 in Paris, a person snaps a picture of a graffiti painted on a wall. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Monday Nov. 23, 2015 in Paris, a woman pushes her stroller by posters reading "Paris still standing". As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Monday Nov. 23, 2015 in Paris, a woman uses her tablet to picture a poster on a wall. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Sunday Nov. 22, 2015 in Paris, a couple walks past by a painted wall. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Sunday Nov. 22, 2015, a couple admire graffiti of Paris city motto "Fluctuat Nec Mergitur", which means "Tossed but not sunk", in Paris. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
In this photo taken on Sunday Nov. 22, 2015, a man rides his bicycle by a painted wall, in Paris. As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance. (AP Photo/Binta Epelly)
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PARIS (AP) — As Paris reeled from the worst attacks France has known since the end of World War II, its street artists took to city walls and billboards to paint notes of defiance.

The Nov. 13 attacks targeted mainly young Parisians enjoying a Friday night out at a crowded rock concert, restaurants, cafes and a soccer match between Germany and France. They left 130 people dead and hundreds more wounded.

SEE ALSO: Obama visits Paris attack site, pays tribute to victims

Tributes for the victims have poured in from around the world, and Parisians have visited the sites of the bloodshed, leaving flowers, candles and notes on sidewalks and pinned to street railings.

Graffiti artists have added their own notes, covering some city walls overnight with messages and paintings, many under the slogan "spray for Paris" — a play on the slogan "pray for Paris" that took social media by storm in the hours after the killings.

"Give me hate, I will turn it into love" wrote one artist on a Parisian door, flanked by two French Tricolor flags on the walls on either side. "Bury the weapons," wrote another. A poster pinned on a lamppost showed the figure of Marianne, an allegorical symbol of the French republic, shedding a blue, white and red tear.

Dozens of variations of slogans such as "Paris, I love you" and "Paris, still standing" adorned the city in graffiti and posters, as well as artistic renditions of the city's motto "Fluctuat Nec Mergitur," meaning sea-tossed but not sinking. The artists' message is clear: Paris might have been battered, but it's not beaten.

See stories of those who died in the Paris attacks:

34 PHOTOS
Stories of those who died in the Paris attacks
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AP PHOTOS: Graffiti artists depict Paris' resilience
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this undated photo provided by Christophe N'Guyen, Cedric Gomet poses for a photograph in Paris. Gomet, of Paris, was a technician for French television network TV5Monde, when he died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks. (Christophe N'Guyen/TV5Monde via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Here is a memorial for Thomas Duperron, reading "rest in peace and in music".(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Displayed is a memorial for Suzon. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This photo courtesy of Ombeline Le Gendre shows Pierre Innocenti, left, and Stéphane Albertini. Innocenti and Albertini died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks when they both went to the Bataclan to enjoy the rock music they both loved. (photo courtesy of Ombeline Le Gendre via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Displayed, is a memorial for Mathieu Hoche.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This undated photo provided by Mathilde Mayet shows Lamia Mondeguer. Mondeguer died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks while celebrating a friend’s birthday at the La Belle Equipe bar. (Mathilde Mayet via AP)
This undated photo provided by Mathilde Mayet shows Lamia Mondeguer. Mondeguer died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks while celebrating a friend’s birthday at the La Belle Equipe bar. (Mathilde Mayet via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Displayed is a memorial for Cecil and Luis .(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this photo taken on Sept. 9, 2011 photo provided by Nicolas Louis, Eric Thome poses for a photograph in Paris. Thome, 39, was an artist, fan of music and father with a 5-year-old girl and another child on the way when he died during the terrorst attack at Bataclan concert hall in Paris. Thome and a partner were running their own Paris design studio after working in the advertising business for years. (Nicolas Louis via AP)
This undated family handout photo issued by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office on Saturday Nov. 14, 2015 shows Nick Alexander of England. Nick Alexander, one of the victims of the attacks in Paris, was working at the Bataclan concert hall selling merchandise for the performing band. (Foreign & Commonwealth Office via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This photo courtesy of Eric Fourmentin shows Romain Didier. Didier died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks while celebrating a friend’s birthday at the La Belle Equipe bar. (Courtesy of Eric Fourmentin via AP)

This undated photo provided by Julien Noel shows Pierre-Antoine Henry. By profession, Henry was an engineer for a company that designed systems for military use. But the father of two was also a dedicated rock fan who had traveled far and wide to see his favorite band, Pearl Jam, said childhood friend Noel. Henry had followed his yen for music to the Eagles of Death Metal show at the Bataclan, where he was killed Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in Paris. (Julien Noel via AP)

Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
In this 2013 photo provided by Leslie Winer, Anne Cornet Guyomard and Pierre-Yves Guyomard are showered with confetti on their wedding day in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France. The couple was killed during the attacks in Paris, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Christophe Van Huffel/Leslie Winer via AP)
In this 2013 photo provided by Leslie Winer, Anne Cornet Guyomard and Pierre-Yves Guyomard pose for a photo while seated in a car on their wedding day in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France. The couple was killed during the attacks in Paris, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Christophe Van Huffel/Leslie Winer via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
An undated photo provided by Joseph Anticevic shows his wife Armelle Pumir Anticevic riding in one of Joseph's cruise boats, named for her. Armelle Pumir Anticevic, 46-year-old mother of two children, ages 9 and 11, was a victim of the Paris attacks. She died at the rock concert at Bataclan hall, where she and her husband had gone to celebrate. He survived. (Joseph Anticevic via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in memory in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

This undated photo provided by Eponyme Galerie shows Alban Denuit, who was killed during attacks claimed by the Islamic State group that took place in several locations in Paris on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Denuit, a 32-year-old American, was a teacher and an artist whose work had been exhibited in Paris. (Eponyme Galerie via AP)

Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Here is a memorial for Pierre, reading "you were the joy of life". (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This December 2012 photo provided by Stephen Fox shows Fanny Minot, one of the victims in the deadly attacks in Paris that occurred Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in Paris. Minot, 29, was an editor at the show, "Le Supplement." "She was such a loving, compassionate person, with such an adventurous view on life," said her friend Stephen Fox. (Stephen Fox via AP)
This December 2012 photo provided by Stephen Fox shows Fanny Minot, one of the victims in the deadly attacks in Paris that occurred Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in Paris. Minot, 29, was an editor at the show, "Le Supplement." "She was such a loving, compassionate person, with such an adventurous view on life," said her friend Stephen Fox. (Stephen Fox via AP)
This December 2012 photo provided by Stephen Fox shows Fanny Minot, one of the victims in the deadly attacks in Paris that occurred Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in Paris. Minot, 29, was an editor at the show, "Le Supplement." "She was such a loving, compassionate person, with such an adventurous view on life," said her friend Stephen Fox. (Stephen Fox via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Here is a memorial for Stephane, reading "you left with this music you loved so much, bon voyage".(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

This 2012 photo courtesy of Caroline Jolivet shows Christophe Foultier at Lake Tahoe, Calif. Foultier died in the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks while watching the band Eagles of Death Metal at the Bataclan. (Courtesy of Caroline Jolivet via AP)

Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
This 2009 photo provided by Yaneyla Hernandez shows Sven Silva, right, with friends Andres Borges, center, and Tomas Corridore, in Rio Chico, Miranda state, Venezuela. Silva was killed in the Nov. 13, 2015, Paris terrorists attacks, when he had traveled to Paris to meet up with two old friends and he decided to head to the show at the Bataclan. (Yaneyla Hernandez via AP)
Pictures of victims, flowers and candles are set in front of Le Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday Nov. 17, 2015, four days after over 130 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. Here, are memorials for Nico Classeau, Germain Ferey and Estelle.(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A picture of a victim of the attack on Bataclan concert hall reads "our teacher" and "r.i.p Romain Dunet" on makeshift memorial outside the Bataclan, the site of one of the six coordinates attacks which claimed the most victims in Paris, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015. France is demanding security aid and assistance from the European Union in the wake of the Paris attacks and has triggered a never-before-used article in the EU's treaties to secure it. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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