AP PHOTOS: Famed Conde guitars still handmade in Madrid

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AP PHOTOS: Famed Conde guitars still handmade in Madrid

In this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015 photo pieces of wood to make 'flamenco' guitars are piled in a workshop in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish 'flamenco' artist Yoni Jimenez rests his hands on his guitar case decorated with a photo of 'flamenco' icon singer "Camaron de la Isla" at a guitar workshop in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish 'flamenco' artist Yoni Jimenez plays a guitar in a guitar workshop in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, photos of Spanish 'flamenco' guitar players are pinned to the wall at a guitar workshop in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish guitar maker Mariano Conde tunes a guitar at his workshop in Madrid. Carrying on the family tradition is Mariano Conde, who operates out of his workshop in downtown Madrid where and he and his son, also called Mariano, build their hand-made, individually sounding, classical and flamenco guitars. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones.(AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, a client, left, leaves guitar maker Mariano Conde's workshop, reflected in the glass of a display window, after buying a new guitar, in Madrid. Carrying on the family tradition is Mariano Conde, who operates out of his workshop in downtown Madrid where and he and his son, also called Mariano, build their hand-made, individually sounding, classical and flamenco guitars. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish guitar maker Mariano Conde works at his workshop in Madrid. Carrying on the family tradition is Mariano Conde, who operates out of his workshop in downtown Madrid where and he and his son, also called Mariano, build their hand-made, individually sounding, classical and flamenco guitars. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones.

(AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish guitar maker Mariano Conde works at his workshop in Madrid. Carrying on the family tradition is Mariano Conde, who operates out of his workshop in downtown Madrid where and he and his son, also called Mariano, build their hand-made, individually sounding, classical and flamenco guitars. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015 photo, two Spanish guitar makers work at a workshop in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015 photo, Spanish 'flamenco' guitarist Camaron de Pitita, right, performs with another artist during a show at the Casa Patas flamenco club in Madrid. Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their beautiful shape, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde Jr works getting the guitar ready for closing during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: Professional guitarist Yago Santos (L) tries on one of the handcrafted guitars made by Felipe Conde (R) in his workshop on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: A detail of the reinforcement to the sides of the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar is seen in Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: A detail of the guitar during the gluing of the purflings at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 25: Different types of wood (from different kind of trees such as Brazilian Cedar, Cypress, Maple, Indian and Madagascar Rosewood or Central European Fir Tree) are seen in Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 25, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 06: Felipe Conde works latching down the neck of the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 6, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 06: A detail of the guitars during the gluing in the fingerboard at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 6, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: In this picture we can see the guitar closed with the help of a tool called 'cessà at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JULY 19: MADRID, SPAIN -APRIL 05: A detail of a tool called 'cees' used in the making of handcrafted guitars at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 03: Felipe Conde works sanding the sides of the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on March 3, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: A detail of the guitar during the gluing of the purflings at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde works getting the bridge of the guitar at his storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde (R) works taming purflings before gluing in the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: A detail of the guitar ready for the gluing of the 'zoquetillosà is seen at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde Jr works getting the guitar ready for closing during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde (L) and Felipe Conde Jr (R) work closing the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde Jr works getting the guitar ready for closing during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde Jr signature the guitar before closing on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 20: A detail of a guitar ready to glue bridge in at Felipe Conde's storehouse on March 20, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde Jr works getting the guitar ready for closing during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JULY 19: MADRID, SPAIN -APRIL 05: A detail of the guitar during the gluing of the purflings at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: A detail of the guitar ready for closing is seen at Felipe Conde's storehouse on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 20: A detail of different tools used in the making of handcrafted guitars at Felipe Conde's storehouse on March 20, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: Felipe Conde Jr works gluing the 'zoquetillos' during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 05: Felipe Conde works gluing puflings during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 20: Felipe Conde Jr works fitting the 'mosaico' in the guitar soundboard during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on March 20 , 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 03: Felipe Conde works sanding down the headstock of the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on March 3, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: Felipe Conde (L) and Felipe Conde Jr (R) work getting the guitar ready for closing during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 20: Felipe Conde Jr works taming in the sides of the guitar during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on March 20, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - APRIL 02: Maria Conde is sanding down the back 'barras' during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 2, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JULY 19: MADRID, SPAIN -APRIL 05: Felipe Conde works gluing puflings during the different phases of the making of the guitar in his workshop on April 5, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - MARCH 20: Felipe Conde works getting the bridge of the guitar at his storehouse on March 20, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Felipe Conde's family has been handcrafting guitars following the families tradition since 1915. They use wood with a 30-year-old drying process, inherited from his father. The guitar's finishing process lasts 2 months and they make about 24 guitars a year. They make two different kinds of guitars, the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar, mainly for professionals around the world. (Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)
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MADRID (AP) — Spanish flamenco guitars are known for their lightness, rich wood colors and full-bodied, crisp musical tones.

Within this world, guitars made over the past century by luthiers of the Conde family in Madrid are among the most revered, with orders coming in from as far away as the United States and Japan.

World-renowned musicians like the late Paco de Lucia and Leonard Cohen have enjoyed guitars made by members of the Conde family, as have Al Di Meola, David Byrne and Lenny Kravitz.

Carrying on the family tradition is Mariano Conde, who operates out of his workshop in downtown Madrid where he and his son, also called Mariano, build their hand-made, individually sounding, classical and flamenco guitars.

Conde says it can take between four and seven months to produce an instrument that costs up to 20,000 euros ($21,300). The guitars are made using pine, cedar, ebony, cypress and palo santo wood, and can contain up to 150 hand-crafted pieces.

Related: See a skateboard turned into a guitar:
Skateboard Turned Guitar Produces Amazing Sound

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