New videos raise fresh questions in Chicago police shooting of black teen

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
New Videos Raise Questions in Chicago Police Shooting

(Reuters) -- Newly released police dashboard camera videos from the scene of the shooting of a black teenager by a white Chicago patrolman could raise fresh questions over documentation of the killing, as the city braced for an organized protest march on Friday.

SEE ALSO: Big balloons, heavy security for NYC Thanksgiving parade

Like the first video released on Tuesday, the new footage lacks discernible audio of the Oct. 20, 2014 shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by Officer Jason Van Dyke. Audio and video should be automatically activated on the cameras, according to police department policy.

See images of protests in Chicago:

26 PHOTOS
Protests in Chicago following Laquan McDonald shooting by police conviction
See Gallery
New videos raise fresh questions in Chicago police shooting of black teen
Two men are detained near Pioneer Court on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders held a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Apple store employees, top, look to protesters lined up outside the Apple store on North Michigan Avenue, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders held a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" on Black Friday in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Protesters make their way up North Michigan Avenue on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders hold a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Iggy Flow, right, talks to police officers on North Michigan Avenue on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015, in Chicago. Community activists and labor leaders hold a demonstration billed as a "march for justice" in the wake of the release of video showing an officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Lamon Reccord, right, stares and yells at a Chicago police officer "Shoot me 16 times" as he and others march through Chicago's Loop Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, one day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, file photo, a protester holds a sign as people rally for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by Chicago Police Department Officer Jason Van Dyke in Chicago. McDonald, whose name demonstrators are shouting as they march the streets and plan to shut down the cityâs glitziest shopping corridor on Friday, lived a troubled life full of disadvantages and at least one previous brush with the law. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
Protesters form a line and walk holding signs that spell out 'Laquan' following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015, in Chicago. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
Demonstrators sit in Michigan Ave. along Chicago's famed Magnificent Mile shopping district, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, during a protest the day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Protesters gesture near Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Chicago police form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters take to the streets in Chicago following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators confront police during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Chicago Police form a line to keep a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald from entering Grant Park, early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Chicago police form a line to prevent protestors from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Authorities form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Police stand guard as demonstrators march through downtown during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters scuffle with Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters scuffle with Chicago police while trying to enter an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Bus passengers watch as demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Authorities form a line to prevent protesters from entering an expressway on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters shut down a street during a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters shut down a street during a protest for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
Protesters march during a demonstration for 17-year-old Laquan McDonald early Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Van Dyke on Tuesday became the first Chicago police officer in decades to be charged with murder for on-duty use of lethal force and is in jail pending a second bond hearing on Monday.

Protests over police killings of black men have rocked a number of U.S. cities in the past 18 months. Chicago has seen muted reaction thus far to such incidents, even though police shootings there have been more frequent on average than in the bigger cities of New York and Los Angeles.

The new footage from dashboard cameras on squad cars, sent to Reuters and other media in response to public record requests, does not show the actual shooting.

McDonald's killing and the 13-month delay in charging Van Dyke and releasing the video led to demonstrations on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The powerful Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) is supporting a Black Friday march along Michigan Avenue, an upscale shopping street, organized by civil rights leader Reverend Jesse Jackson.

"We have watched in anger and disappointment as the city has covered up police violence," CTU Vice President Jesse Sharkey said in a statement. He accused Mayor Rahm Emanuel of delaying release of the videos while he was running for re-election, which he won in April. Emanuel and other officials said they delayed releasing the video to avoid tainting the investigation of Van Dyke.

There were no signs of protests on Thursday despite some calls on social media for demonstrations at the annual Thanksgiving Day parade.

Police guarded the parade through Chicago's downtown business district, which was packed with families and tourists watching high school bands playing instruments and dancing as inflatables hovered above their heads.

A HISTORY OF COMPLAINTS

Van Dyke had 20 misconduct complaints against him but he was never disciplined, according to the Citizens Police Data Project, a database of 56,000 misconduct complaints against Chicago police officers compiled by the Invisible Institute, a transparency organization.

However, a federal jury in a civil trial against Van Dyke and Thomas McKenna found in 2010 that the two officers had used excessive force during a 2007 traffic stop. The city was ordered to pay the plaintiff, Edward Nance, $350,000 in damages as well as $180,000 in legal fees, according to documents in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

TECHNICAL PROBLEM

The first tape of the shooting was released under court order hours after Van Dyke was charged. It showed McDonald as he was gunned down in the middle of a street.

Police said the sound was missing from the first tape due to an unspecified technical problem. A spokesman for the department did not immediately respond on Thursday to an e-mailed question about why the footage released on Wednesday also does not have audio.

One of those new videos is from the patrol car that Van Dyke was in and shows McDonald running away from the vehicle. The shooting occurs off camera.

SEE ALSO: Former officer accused of faking shootout found dead in home

Prosecutors and police said McDonald was carrying a folding knife and had the hallucinogenic drug PCP in his system.

The Chicago Police Department directive on dashboard cameras says they "automatically engage audio and video recording when the vehicle's emergency-roof lights are activated."

Officers are supposed to verify cameras are working properly and immediately notify a supervisor if they are inoperable, according to the directive. Police can also manually activate the system.

Chicago police have shot an average of 50 people a year over the last seven years. That average exceeds that of the larger cities of New York and Los Angeles.

Of those shot by Chicago police, 74 percent have been black. On average there have been 17 fatal police shootings in Chicago each year since 2007.

More from AOL.com:
Trump pounces back at alleged swipe at reporter
Alarming figure shows looming threat to rainforest
Watch Eagles of Death Metal's first interview since Paris attacks

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners