American Apparel faces major backlash for Black Friday employee t-shirt

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What's Next After American Apparel's Bankruptcy Filing
American Apparel, the "hipster" clothing store that filed for bankruptcy last month, is in the headlines once again.

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The "made in America" brand, which is known for pushing the boundaries, has reportedly asked that employees wear shirts for Black Friday that say, "Ask me to take it all off."



The Mary Sue was recently sent an email from an anonymous American Apparel employee, who shared the email from corporate. The employee expressed that the shirt made them feel uncomfortable and even sexualized.



According to The Mary Sue's source, corporate said that shirts were optional, but highly encouraged.

UPDATE: In a statement made to The Mary Sue via email, an American Apparel spokesperson said the slogan will be discontinued. The statement (in part) reads:



[h/t Mic]

In 2014, the company fired its founder Dov Charney, after an "ongoing investigation into alleged misconduct." Take a look at the former CEO here:

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Dov Charney
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American Apparel faces major backlash for Black Friday employee t-shirt
Dov Charney, chairman and chief executive officer of American Apparel Inc., speaks during an interview outside a company retail store in New York, U.S., on Thursday, July 29, 2010. Starting the company in a dorm at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, Charney built a worldwide empire of 280 clothing stores by leaping out ahead of mainstream fashion. He personified the racy, risk-taking aesthetics of his business and is now facing the consequences - skittish lenders and investors who doubt his ability to oversee his own creation. Photographer: Keith Bedford/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Dov Charney of American Apparel during 2005 LA Fashion Awards - Show at Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Photo by Michael Tran/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK - MAY 21: American Apparel Founder Dov Charney poses for a photo on May 21, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Johannes Kroemer/Getty Images)
Dov Charney, chairman and chief executive officer of American Apparel Inc., stands for a portrait in a company retail store in New York, U.S., on Thursday, July 29, 2010. Starting the company in a dorm at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, Charney built a worldwide empire of 280 clothing stores by leaping out ahead of mainstream fashion. He personified the racy, risk-taking aesthetics of his business and is now facing the consequences - skittish lenders and investors who doubt his ability to oversee his own creation. Photographer: Keith Bedford/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Dov Charney, senior partner of American Apparel, announces he will shutter his garment manufacturing plant that employs some 1,500 workers, in observance of a scheduled Dec. 12 economic strike by Latinos, at a rally at Los Angeles' downtown Plaza Thursday evening, Dec. 11, 2003. Nativo Lopez, president of the Mexican American Political Association, listens at right. Several groups and individuals are protesting, among other things, the recent repeal of California Senate Bill 60, which had granted driver licenses to illegal immigrants. Organizers called on Hispanics in California to stay home from work, school and stores Friday. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Mannequins sit on display at an American Apparel clothing store in New York, U.S., on Thursday, July 29, 2010. Dov Charney started American Apparel Inc. in a dorm at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, and built a worldwide empire of 280 stores by leaping out ahead of mainstream fashion. He personified the racy, risk-taking aesthetics of his business and is now facing the consequences - skittish lenders and investors who doubt his ability to oversee his own creation. Photographer: Keith Bedford/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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