Texas student arrested over clock seeks millions from city, schools

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The family of a Texas Muslim teenager arrested for bringing a homemade clock that was mistaken for a bomb to school demanded $15 million in damages and an apology from the city of Irving and its schools to avoid a lawsuit, lawyers said on Monday.

The lawyers represent the family of Ahmed Mohamed, 14, a student who dabbles in robotics and attended a Dallas-area high school. His arrest in September sparked controversy, with many saying he was taken into custody because of his religion.

SEE ALSO: Boy withdraws from school that suspended him over clock

In separate letters to the city of Irving, located west of Dallas, and the Irving Independent School District, lawyers said the ninth grader was wrongfully arrested, illegally detained and questioned without his parents.

The Mohamed family is asking for $10 million from the city and $5 million from the school district or they will file civil lawsuits within 60 days, the letter said.

"Understandably, Mr. Mohamed was furious at the treatment of his son – and at the rancid, openly discriminatory intent that motivated it," attorneys said in one of the letters.

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Ahmed Mohamed 14 year old student arrested for bringing a clock to school
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Texas student arrested over clock seeks millions from city, schools
Ahmed Mohamed, 14, gestures as he arrives to his family's home in Irving, Texas, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015. Ahmed was arrested Monday at his school after a teacher thought a homemade clock he built was a bomb. He remains suspended and said he will not return to classes at MacArthur High School. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Ahmed Mohamed (2-L), a 14-year-old Sudanese Muslim teenager from the United States who became an overnight sensation after a Texas teacher mistook his homemade clock for a bomb, looks on during an interview in the capital Khartoum on October 15, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ASHRAF SHAZLY (Photo credit should read ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27: Student Ahmed Mohamed (L) and National Geographic Society CEO Gary Knell attend the Social Good Summit at the 92nd Street Y on September 27, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images for Global Goals)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 26: Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (R) and Sare Davutoglu (L) take a selfie with 14-year-old Muslim boy Ahmed Mohamed (C) arrested for bringing a homemade clock what school officials and police described as a hoax bomb on campus in New York on September 26, 2015. (Photo by Hakan Goktepe/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Ahmed Mohamed, 14, talks on a cell phone outside his family's home in Irving, Texas, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015. Ahmed was arrested Monday at his school after a teacher thought a homemade clock he built was a bomb. He remains suspended and said he will not return to classes at MacArthur High School. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 17: Ahmed Mohamed, a Texas Muslim teen arrested after taking his homemade clock to school, explains his clock at his house in Irving, Texas on September 17, 2015. A Texas Muslim teen arrested after taking his homemade clock to school, on Wednesday accepted an invitation by President Barack Obama to show off his invention at the White House. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed is comforted by his father Mohamed Elhassan Mohamed, as they attend a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: 14-year-old Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed stands with his father Mohamed Elhassan Mohamed during a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
Ahmed Mohamed, 14, right, waves to the media from the front door of his house as his sister, Eyman Mohamed, looks on before a news conference, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, in Irving, Texas. Ahmed was arrested after a teacher thought a homemade clock he built was a bomb. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: 14-year-old Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed speaks during a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: 14-year-old Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed, surrounded by his family, speaks during a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: 14-year-old Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed is greeted by a supporter during a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: (L-R) Attorney Linda Moreno, Ahmed Ahmed Mohamed, and Mohamed Elhassan Mohamed address the media during a news conference on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed, 14, was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
Irving MacArthur High School student Ahmed Mohamed, 14, poses for a photo at his home in Irving, Texas on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015. Mohamed was arrested and interrogated by Irving Police officers on Monday after bringing a homemade clock to school. Police don't believe the device is dangerous, but say it could be mistaken for a fake explosive. He was suspended from school for three days, but he has not been charged. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News via AP) 
Ahmed's sister told me to post this. Yes this situation is real for those questioning. http://t.co/Oxd0JxUS6O
This photo provided by the Irving Police Department shows the homemade clock that Ahmed Mohamed brought to school, Wednesday, Sept.16, 2015, in Irving. Police detained the 14-year-old Muslim boy after a teacher at MacArthur High School decided that the homemade clock he brought to class looked like a bomb, according to school and police officials. The family of Ahmed Mohamed said the boy was suspended for three days from the school in the Dallas suburb. (Irving Police via AP)
IRVING, TX - SEPTEMBER 16: Israa Abdellah, 17, a student at Jack E. Singley Academy in Irving, Texas, holds a sign in support of Ahmed Ahmed Mohammed on September 16, 2015 in Irving, Texas. Mohammed was detained after a high school teacher falsely concluded that a homemade clock he brought to class might be a bomb. The news converence, held outside the Mohammed family home, was hosted by the North Texas Chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. (Photo by Ben Torres/Getty Images)
A sign lights up as a student stands by before classes star at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015. Ahmed Mohamed, 14, was arrested at the school after a teacher thought a homemade clock he built was a bomb. The student remains suspended from attending classes today and it is unsure if he will return. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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The school district said in a statement its lawyers are reviewing the letter and will respond appropriately. City officials were not immediately available for comment.

The boy's family said in October that they would be moving to Qatar and he had accepted an offer from the Qatar Foundation to study at its Young Innovators Program. The announcement came a few hours after he was at the White House for an astronomy night hosted by President Barack Obama.

Ahmed won support from Obama and other major U.S. figures, including Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, who said "having the skill and ambition to build something cool should lead to applause, not arrest."

The family, now living in Doha, has also traveled the globe to meet foreign dignitaries.

Sudanese state radio reported that his father took him to meet Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. The Sudanese leader is accused by the International Criminal Court of masterminding genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes during Sudan's Darfur conflict.

Despite several television appearances and worldwide travel, the Mohamed family says the attention ruined their lives and eventually drove them out of the country, lawyers said.

(Editing by Jon Herskovitz and Jonathan Oatis)

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