Clinton to propose $6,000 tax credit for caregiving costs

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CLINTON, Iowa (Reuters) -- U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will on Sunday propose a $6,000 tax credit for costs associated with caring for elderly and disabled family members, and allowing caregivers to accrue Social Security retirement benefits for such work.

The caregiving credit will be the latest in a "range of tax cuts aimed a boosting the take-home pay for middle-class families" that Clinton will announce over the coming weeks, according to a campaign aide.

Clinton, who will appear in Iowa Sunday, has previously announced a tax credit of $2,500 for an individual or $5,000 for a family to cover high healthcare costs and another credit that would cover some of the expense of attending college.

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There are about 12 million people in the United States who need long-term care and that number is expected to grow to 27 million by 2050 as the population ages. Clinton's campaign estimates that the economic value of the unpaid work provided by family caregivers of the aging and disabled was $470 billion in 2013.

Assisting adults caring for their aging parents - often while also raising their own children or helping with grandchildren - has become a theme at Clinton's campaign stops.

Clinton met New Hampshire resident Keith Thompson before a September appearance. Thompson told the former secretary of state and U.S. senator he sometimes takes his elderly mother with him to his part-time job because they cannot otherwise afford reliable care.

"You know your story is so incredibly moving and it's also a story for so many people, that's what I keep finding, everywhere I go," Clinton told Thompson in a video of the exchange provided by the campaign.

Clinton has cited Thompson's story frequently since.

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Clinton to propose $6,000 tax credit for caregiving costs
Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, laughs out loud after Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., asked Clinton if she was home alone during night of the 2012 Benghazi attacks during testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, before the House Select Committee on Benghazi. After laughing out loud, Clinton said it was a bit of levity at 7:15 p.m., more than nine hours since the hearing began. She described conversations with other officials and said, "I did not sleep all night." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Hillary Rodham Clinton reacts as she talks to supporters after a Democratic presidential primary debate, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton reacts to a supporter before speaking at a community forum, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Hillary Clinton, former U.S. secretary of state and democratic candidate for U.S. president, gives a thumbs-up to supporters during her introduction at an Iowa launch event in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Sunday, June 14, 2015. Hillary Clinton voiced discontent Sunday with the current status of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal and suggested that she would fight to change it to 'take the lemons and turn it into lemonade.' Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DES MOINES, IOWA - JUNE 14: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets supporters after campaign rally at the Elwell Family Food Center inside the Iowa State Fairgrounds during a rally in Des Moines, Iowa, on Sunday, June 14, 2015. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 09: Former Secretary of State and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about Iran at the Brookings Institute September 9, 2015 in Washington, DC. Clinton spoke in favor of the Iran nuclear agreement and its implications for U.S. foreign policy and national security. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Hillary Clinton, former U.S. secretary of state and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, holds a pork chop on a stick and lemonade as she tours the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015. Clinton said today she doesn't see the continued scrutiny of her e-mail practices while heading the State Department as a liability for her campaign for the White House. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - JULY 17: Secretary Hillary Clinton greets, talks, and takes pictures with her Iowa organizers during a pizza party in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on Friday, July 17, 2015. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
DOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE: JULY 16 - Secretary Hillary Clinton with voters at her first town Hall meeting in Dover, New Hampshire, on Thursday, July 16, 2015. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
US Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton arrives to speak on outlining economic vision at the New School in New York on July 13, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
FLORISSANT, MO - JUNE 23: Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters on June 23, 2015 at Christ the King United Church of Christ in Florissant, Missouri. Clinton's visit to the St. Louis suburb neighboring Ferguson, Missouri focused on racial issues. (Photo by Whitney Curtis/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JUNE 14: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a campaign event at the the Elwell Family food Center at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on June 14, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. Clinton officially kicked off her 2016 bid for the White House yesterday during an event on New Yorks Roosevelt Island. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a news conference, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Sept. 4, 2015. Clinton, who won Puerto Rico's 2008 Democratic primary election, defended her support for giving Puerto Rico bankruptcy protection during the round-table discussion focused on the island's health-care problems. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton greets Des Moines businessman Bill Knapp, right, during a visit to the Iowa State Fair, Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton responds to the cheers of supporters at a Jefferson Jackson event hosted by the Democratic Party of Virginia at George Mason University’s Patriot Center, in Fairfax, Va., Friday, June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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Taxes are shaping up to be a differentiator between Clinton, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination, and her challengers, U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley.

Clinton's campaign says she is committed to not raising but cutting taxes for the middle class and criticized some of Sanders' proposals, such as his healthcare plan, saying it would necessitate raising taxes on moderate wage earners.

Clinton Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri told reporters "the most important moment" for the campaign during last week's second Democratic debate was when the three discussed taxing the middle class and to expect Clinton to discuss it more fully in the coming days.

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