CNN suspends reporter for passionate pro-refugee tweet

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CNN anchor Elise Labbot suspended
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CNN suspends reporter for passionate pro-refugee tweet
You heard it right. @realdonaldTrump doesn't rule out national database for U.S. Muslims via @jdiamond1 @CNNPolitics https://t.co/BMdFtzF287
Things I can say since leaving WaPo: Bravo @eliselabottcnn for what you tweeted about refugee bill.
@eliselabottcnn @lrozen France accepts 30,000 while we cower in fear. Lady Liberty will look great in her new home https://t.co/AyA9Cgl5ng
Everyone, It was wrong of me to editorialize. My tweet was inappropriate and disrespectful. I sincerely apologize.
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CNN has suspended Elise Labott, a global affairs correspondent at the network, for two weeks following a passionate pro-refugee tweet, a CNN source confirmed to Business Insider.

After the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed legislation on Thursday to stifle the flow of US refugees from Syria and Iraq, Labott slammed the bill.

"House passes bill that could limit Syrian refugees. Statue of Liberty bows head in anguish," she wrote on Twitter.

That tweet prompted immediate backlash from critics who said she shouldn't have been opining on contentious legislation. Unlike some of its competitors, CNN typically strives for a straight-news, nonpartisan approach to its broadcasting.

"CNN correspondent lays bare bias in one easy tweet," The Washington Post's media critic, Erick Wemple, wrote on Twitter.

"I was stunned that Elise Labott, a CNN reporter, would tweet about Statue of Liberty hanging its head after Syrian refugee bill passed," added Howard Kurtz, a media-focused Fox News host. Kurtz further called the tweet "disrespectful."

The issue of Syrian refugees became charged after last week's terror attack in Paris, which left more than 100 people dead and hundreds more injured. A Syrian passport was reportedly found on one of the attackers.

See representatives discussing and voting on the refugee screening process:

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Congress discussing, voting on refugee screening
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CNN suspends reporter for passionate pro-refugee tweet
WASHINGTON, USA - NOVEMBER 19: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the press about legislation being introduced in the House of Representatives to modify the 1980 Refugee Act in Washington, USA on November 19, 2015. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., joined by, from left, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., and Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., answers a reporter's question during a news conference by Democrats on policy toward Syrian refugees coming to the U.S., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Women in the audience listen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, during the House Immigration and Border Security subcommittee hearing to examine the Syrian refugee crisis and its impact on the security of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
From left, Assistant Secretary with the State Department Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Anne Richard, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Leon Rodriguez, and Seth Jones, International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation, are sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, prior to testifying before the House Judiciary Immigration and Border Security subcommittee hearing to examine the Syrian refugee crisis and its impact on the security of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., left, talks with Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, a member of the Intelligence Committee, outside the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, as GOP leaders in Congress are calling for a pause in Syrian refugees coming to the U.S. in the wake of the Paris attacks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
WASHINGTON, USA - NOVEMBER 19: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the press about legislation being introduced in the House of Representatives to modify the 1980 Refugee Act in Washington, USA on November 19, 2015. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., joined by Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., left, points to the embedded chip in her passport that contains digital information, as she and other Democrats talk about security measures for Syrian refugees and others coming into the U.S., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Immigration and Border Security subcommittee Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., left, shakes hands with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Leon Rodriguez on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, before the subcommittee's hearing to examine the Syrian refugee crisis and its impact on the security of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program where Rodriguez testified. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
House Immigration and Border Security subcommittee Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., listens to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, during the subcommittee's hearing to examine the Syrian refugee crisis and its impact on the security of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., center, flanked by Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., left, and Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., right, answers a reporter's question during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, on policy for Syrian refugees coming to the U.S. Democrats are opposed to tighter restrictions on the refugees coming to the U.S. as proposed in legislation by congressional Republicans in the aftermath of the Paris terror attacks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., center, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015, on policy for Syrian refugees coming to the U.S. Democrats are opposed to tighter restrictions on the refugees coming to the U.S. as proposed in legislation by congressional Republicans in the aftermath of the Paris terror attack. From left are, Senate Minority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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Republican leaders widely declared that President Barack Obama's Syrian-refugee plan constitutes a national-security risk. In a stunning blow to Obama, a number of House Democrats voted for the Republican-backed bill on Thursday.

For her part, Labott apologized Thursday night on Twitter.

NOW WATCH: US governors say they don't want to accept Syrian refugees, but one that made it to the US describes the horrors he fled

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