After attacks, many Parisians embrace food, wine and friends

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NTP: Life resuming in Paris one week after attacks
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After attacks, many Parisians embrace food, wine and friends
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Iguana Cafe' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Le Paradis' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at '1er Bistrot Philo' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Charonne Cafe' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Le Bistrot du Commerce' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris.. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Chez Gladines' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy at 'Acqua e Farina', close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture a woman enjoy dinner at 'Pizza, pour emporter' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'La Plage' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture a people enjoy dinner at 'Le Petit Baiona' restaurant close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris.. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Creperie Bretonne' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?' (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
In this Nov. 17, 2015 picture people enjoy dinner at 'Paris - Hanoi' close to one of the spots of Friday's attacks in Paris. Parisians are returning to cafes, bars and restaurants, determined that the Nov. 13 attacks won't alter the city's way of life. President Francois Hollande has told his compatriots that 'life must resumed in full,' asking: 'What would our country be without its cafes?'(AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)
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PARIS (AP) — In France, a glass of wine is many things: one of life's small pleasures, a civilized complement to food, a source of national pride. Now, it's also a symbol of defiance.

As vintners release this year's batch of Beaujolais Nouveau in the shadow of last week's Paris attacks, "To the bistro!" has replaced "To the barricades!" as France's rallying cry.

SEE ALSO: Recovery just beginning for many of Paris wounded

"What would our country be without its cafes?" asked President Francois Hollande, telling his compatriots that life must be "resumed in full" after the Nov. 13 gun and bomb rampage by jihadi militants.

The attacks, which killed 129 people and injured more than 350, have left France in shock. They overshadowed Thursday's Beaujolais Nouveau Day, when winemakers uncork their latest batch of the fruity young wine, and bars and restaurants hold special tasting sessions.

Jean Bourjade of the wine producers' body Inter Beaujolais said the group considered scrapping some of the promotional events after the attacks. But it was decided that the wine should flow, because "it is the French culture, it is the French way of life, which has been put in jeopardy."

Many Parisians are determined to raise a glass — even those who consider Beaujolais Nouveau's popularity a product of savvy marketing rather than quality.

"The Beaujolais isn't good wine. But everyone will go out on purpose tonight," said 63-year-old Lucienne Tavera, sitting with two friends on a cafe terrace near the Bataclan concert hall, where the deadliest of the attacks unfolded.

"Tonight, we won't care how it tastes."

Her resolve is echoed across the patch of eastern Paris where the attacks took place — the 11th arrondissement and the neighboring Canal Saint-Martin area in the 10th.

Related: See monuments around the world light up blue, white, and red for France:

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Monuments red, white, blue, in solidarity for Paris
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After attacks, many Parisians embrace food, wine and friends
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 14: Pedestrians walk in front of the Sydney Opera House as its sails are illuminated in the colours of the French flag on November 14, 2015 in Sydney, Australia. At least 120 people have been killed and over 200 are injured in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday. (Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images)
Christ the Redeemer statue is lit with the colors of France's flag, in solidarity with France after attacks in Paris, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Multiple attacks across Paris on Friday night left scores dead and hundreds injured. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 14: The London Eye is lit up in the colours of the French flag on November 14, 2015 in London, England. Various landmarks around the globe have been lit in their colours in the wake of the Paris attacks. (Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
The Oriental Pearl TV Tower (C), in the Lujiazui Financial District in Pudong, is lit in red, white and blue, resembling the colours of the French flag, in Shanghai on November 14, 2015, as the Chinese expressed their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. The Oriental Pearl tower was bathed in the French flag colours for one hour. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
Rome's city hall (Campidoglio) is lighted with France's colors, blue, white and red, on January 8, 2015 in Rome in remembrance of the victims of an attack against Charlie Hebdo satirical weekly which killed 12 people in Paris yesterday. AFP PHOTO / ALBERTO PIZZOLI (Photo credit should read ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images)
The One World Trade Center spire is lit blue, white and red after New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the lighting in honor of dozens killed in the Paris attacks Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in New York. French officials say several dozen people have been killed in shootings and explosions at a theater, restaurant and elsewhere in Paris. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
Mumbaiâs Chhatrapati Shivaji train station building is illuminated by the colors of the French national flag in solidarity with France following Friday's Paris terror attacks, Mumbai, India, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. This Mumbai landmark was one of the major targets of the 2008 terror attacks that killed 166 people. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
The Washington Square Park arch is lit with the French national colors in solidarity with the citizens of France on November 14, 2015 in New York, a day after the Paris terrorist attacks. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Two Ultra-Orthodox Jews look at Jerusalem's Old City walls illuminated by the colors of the French national flag in solidarity with France after attacks in Paris, in Jerusalem, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
A paddle wheel riverboat passes under a bridge illuminated with the colors of the French flag to show solidarity for the deadly Paris attacks Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
London's National Gallery and the fountains in Trafalgar Square are illuminated in blue, white and red lights, resembling the colours of the French national flag, in London on November 14, 2015, as Britons express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 129 dead in Paris on November 13. Islamic State jihadists claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks by suicide bombers and gunmen in Paris that killed at least 128 people at a concert hall, restaurants and the national sports stadium. At least eight militants, all wearing suicide vests, brought unprecedented violence to the streets of the French capital in the worst attacks in Europe since the 2004 Madrid train bombings. The assault also left at least 250 wounded, 100 of them seriously. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
The Planalto Presidential Palace is seen illuminated with the colors of the flag of France in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks, in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. Multiple terrorist attacks across Paris on Friday night have left more than one hundred dead and many more injured. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
The facade of the Cibeles Palace, Madrid's town hall, is illuminated red, white and blue to represent the French national standard in Madrid on November 14, 2015 in support for victims and families following a series of terror attacks in the French city of Paris and its surroundings that has left at least 120 people dead and some 200 wounded. A spate of co-ordinated attacks left 128 dead and 200 injured in Paris last night, a day after twin bombings in Beirut left 44 dead, and nearly two weeks after IS claimed it downed a Russian jet leaving Egypt, killing 224 on board. in Madrid on November 14, 2015.AFP PHOTO / GERARD JULIEN (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Bratislava Castle is lit in red, white and blue, the colors of the French flag, in Bratislava on November 14, 2015, as Slovakians express their solidarity with France following the coordinated terrorist attacks that left at least 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. AFP PHOTO / VLADIMIR SIMICEK (Photo credit should read VLADIMIR SIMICEK/AFP/Getty Images)
A man shelters from the rain beneath a Union flag-themed umbrella as he photographs London's iconic Tower Bridge, illuminated in blue, white and red lights, resembling the colours of the French national flag, in London on November 14, 2015, as Britons express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead in Paris on November 13. Islamic State jihadists claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks by suicide bombers and gunmen in Paris that killed at least 128 people at a concert hall, restaurants and the national sports stadium. At least eight militants, all wearing suicide vests, brought unprecedented violence to the streets of the French capital in the worst attacks in Europe since the 2004 Madrid train bombings. The assault also left at least 250 wounded, 100 of them seriously. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 11: The National Gallery is lit in the blue, white and red colours of the national flag of France in tribute to the victims of the terrorist attacks in Paris on January 11, 2015 in London, England. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 14: The Brandenburg Gate is illuminated in the French national colors in tribute for the victims of the 13 November Paris attacks in Berlin, Germany, on November 14, 2015. At least 128 people have been killed and 250 others injured in a series of attacks in Paris on 13 November. (Photo by Erbil Basay/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Egyptian tour guides hold a candlelight vigil at the base of the Great Pyramid of Giza in solidarity with victims of attacks in Paris and Beirut and the Russian plane crash in northern Sinai, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. The Islamic State group have claimed responsibility for Friday night's attacks in Paris, Thursdays's twin powerful suicide bombings that tore through a crowded Shiite neighborhood of Beirut, and bringing down a Russian jetliner over Egypt's Sinai region earlier this month. (AP Photo/Thomas Hartwell)
People stand near the Washington Square Arch, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015, at Washington Square Park in New York. The Arch was lit in remembrance of the deadly attacks in Paris on Friday. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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After 8 p.m., about 100 young people were out in the rain at the Place de la Republique, a central square in one of the neighborhoods and a home to several candlelit memorials to the victims. Cafés and restaurants in the area were about half full.

When the Islamic State group took responsibility for the attacks, it called Paris "the capital of prostitution and obscenity."

The militants did not hit the city's high-profile tourist attractions, gleaming buildings and neighborhoods of freshly washed streets. They chose an eclectic, slightly scruffy area where destination restaurants, hip bars, art galleries and designer boutiques sit alongside corner stores, kebab shops and bakeries.

It's also a place where a mosque, a church and a Jewish school occupy the same few blocks — a diversity that many residents treasure.

"There are Jews, Muslims, young people, old people in this neighborhood. It's a family," said 28-year-old Charlotte Pagnoux. "This is the heart of Paris, the soul of Paris. This is why they came here. They struck at the heart of Paris."

It's also an area — like parts of Brooklyn or east London — that first has grown edgy and then affluent.

The district's longstanding working-class residents have been joined over the decades by immigrants from North Africa, young creative types and — as social cachet and property prices rose — by well-off "bourgeois bohemians" or "bobos."

On that unusually warm November evening last week, gunmen rampaged through the area, firing automatic weapons at packed bars and cafes and storming the Bataclan concert hall during a performance by the U.S. band Eagles of Death Metal. Eighty-nine people died at the Bataclan, and 40 elsewhere.

By choosing this area, the attackers hit at the city's young and bohemian heart. The roll call of the dead shows that most victims were in their 20s and 30s, and many worked in the media and creative professions: as architects, artists, journalists, designers and musicians.

The Bataclan is a place that generations of Parisians have associated with fun. Built in the 19th century in an ebullient Chinese-influenced style, it has hosted musicians from Maurice Chevalier to Iron Maiden. It's also famous for its club nights, including long-established, lively gay parties on weekends.

"I have so many glittery memories on Saturday night — laughing with friends, dancing with drag queens," said Stephane Le Breton, a marketing consultant and Bataclan regular. "It's beyond comprehension that this is the same place in which this evil last Friday was unleashed.

"I feel like can never set my foot in there again. It's the end of an era."

Many others share the fear that things will never be the same.

On the weekend after the attacks, restaurant business plunged 80 percent, according to France's hotel and restaurant union. Tables filled up again through the week, as Parisians heeded the call to go out, popularized on social media with the slogan "Tous au bistrot" — "Everyone to the bistro!"

"This is what we do to make things go back to normal," said Frederic Hoffmann, who runs a creperie down the street from one of the stricken bars and had spent several hours shuttered inside amid the attacks. "We open the restaurant. We get people together, to try to talk and make some sense out of it."

For the past six days, people in the area have talked about little else. Normal life will resume, but locals worry that once the mounds of flowers, candles and tributes outside the attack sites are gone, the landscape of their neighborhood will have irrevocably changed.

Ismael Jole-Menebhi, a reggae singer who lost a friend in one of the cafe attacks, said the killers had targeted the area's diverse social mix.

But he vowed they wouldn't succeed in dividing residents.

"We want to love each other and we (want) to say it to each other," said Jole-Menebhi. "And we want to spend more time together. So on that goal, at least I can say that they failed."

Tribute to Melting-Pot Paris at Site of Terror Attacks

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Associated Press writers Thomas Adamson and Maria Sanminiatelli in Paris contributed to this report.

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Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless


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