More Mexican immigrants leaving US than entering: Pew

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The US Has Fewer Immigrants Than You Think

(Reuters) -- More Mexicans are leaving the United States than entering it according to a report released on Thursday, at a time when some Republicans, including presidential candidate Donald Trump, have taken a hard line on illegal immigration.

Most Mexicans leaving the United States are doing so voluntarily to reunite with their family or to start one, the report by the Pew Research Center showed.

SEE ALSO: New bill in Congress proposes stricter vetting of refugees

From 2009 to 2014, more than one million Mexicans and their families left the United States for Mexico, while more than 865,000 entered the United States, Pew said. The figures include unauthorized immigrants.

An increasing share of Mexicans says life north of the border is neither better nor worse than life in Mexico, Pew said.

The overall flow of Mexican immigrants between the two countries is at its smallest since the 1990s, Pew said.

The findings follow Trump's call for mass deportation of undocumented immigrants, a plan President Barack Obama has said is too costly and un-American.

Trump, a real estate billionaire who has been among the leading candidates for the Republican nomination in the presidential 2016 election, also said he would get the Mexican government to pay for building a wall along the border.

More than 16 million Mexican immigrants have migrated to the United States in the last 50 years, more than from any other country, Pew said.

From fewer than 1 million living in the United States in 1970, the number of Mexican immigrants peaked at 12.8 million by 2007, Pew said. The total declined to 11.7 million last year.

See the stories of people leaving the United States:

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Many Mexicans leaving the US
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More Mexican immigrants leaving US than entering: Pew
Saul Solis, 40, speaks during an interview Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. During his 19 years in the United States, Solis learned to remodel homes but now has returned to Mexico. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Feliciano Bermejo, 49, speaks during an interview Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. Bermejo spent 21 years in the United States before returning voluntarily to Mexico. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Security guard Guillermo Soria, left, helps a customer while working in front of a Smart & Final store Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. After living for nearly 25 years in the United States, Soria returned to Mexico and found work as a security guard. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2012 file photo, people line up to cross into the United States from Mexicali, Mexico, before dawn in Calexico, Calif. More Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history, according to a study published Thursday. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
FILE - In this March 7, 2012 file photo, people make their way towards the border to cross in Mexicali, Mexico. More Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history, according to a study published Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
FILE - In this April 28, 2010, file photo, men look for a place to sleep in a crowded shelter for migrants deported from the United States, in the border city of Nogales, Mexico. More Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history, according to a study published Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Feliciano Bermejo, 49, speaks during an interview Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Rodrigo Quiroz, 43, gestures as he stands for a portrait Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. After seven years living illegally in Arizona, Quiroz has returned to Mexico. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Security guard Guillermo Soria organizes shopping carts while working in front of a Smart & Final store Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. After living for nearly 25 years in the United States, Soria returned to Mexico and found work as a security guard. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Security guard Guillermo Soria looks on while working in front of a Smart & Final store Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. After living for nearly 25 years in the United States, Soria returned to Mexico and found work as a security guard. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
A woman passes an image of Jesus at a shelter for migrants Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in Tijuana, Mexico. A new study finds more Mexicans are leaving the United States than coming to the country, marking a reversal to one of the most significant immigration trends in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Graphic shows Mexican immigration population in the U.S. over time; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
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The drop is mostly due to a decrease of more than 1 million unauthorized immigrants from a peak of 6.9 million in 2007 to 5.6 million in 2014, Pew said. Still, unauthorized immigrants from Mexico account for about half of all U.S. unauthorized immigrants.

Pew has been tracking flows for about 15 years, said Ana Gonzalez-Barrera, a research associate who wrote the report. For its report, Pew analyzed government data from both countries.

"This is the first time that we have the actual evidence and numbers of people going back," she said.

About half of all adults in Mexico believe those who moved to the United States lead better lives, but 33 percent say life is neither better nor worse north of the border, up from 23 percent in 2007, Pew said.

Other reasons for the decreased inflow include the slow recovery of the U.S. economy after the recession and stricter enforcement of U.S. immigration laws at the border.

Related: Feelings on immigration in California:

17 PHOTOS
Immigration in California
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More Mexican immigrants leaving US than entering: Pew
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Anti-immigration activists protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Anti-immigration activist Sabina Durden (R) and immigration sympathizer Mary Estrada (L) debate during a protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
Bikramjit Singh, 9, center, and his sister Parneet Kaur, 11, immigrants from India, joined more than a dozen other young people who took an oath of citizenship,Thursday, July 2, 2015, in Sacramento, Calif. The children, aged 6-17, each have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen and became U.S. citizens after their parents were naturalized. They were presented certificates of citizenship as part of Independence Day celebrations. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Irma Castillo, outreach coordinator with United Farm Workers Foundation, left, gives Erica Montoya, 32, right, paperwork during an immigration workshop in Hanford, California, U.S., on Thursday, March 19, 2015. President Barack Obama announced Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in November as a response to Congress' unwillingness to update a policy that both parties agree is flawed. Recipients would enter the formal economy with work permits and Social Security numbers, creating a legal workforce for businesses, greater security for themselves and revenue for government coffers. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Juan Barbosa, 23, of Bakersfield, looks at a confirmation of petition acceptance for his application to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) employment authorization renewal at the United Farm Workers Foundation offices in Bakersfield, California, U.S., on Thursday, March 19, 2015. President Barack Obama announced his DACA program in November as a response to Congress' unwillingness to update a policy that both parties agree is flawed. Recipients would enter the formal economy with work permits and Social Security numbers, creating a legal workforce for businesses, greater security for themselves and revenue for government coffers. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
EL MONTE, CALIFORNIA , DECEMBER 10, 2014: Letisia Huertado (left) helps Destiny Valle (middle) and Ashley Vargas (right) construct sentences in their first grade class at Parkview School, on December 10, 2014 in El Monte. State education officials are preparing to issue the first report documenting the number of students who have continued to struggle with substandard English for more than 7 years, even though most of them were born in the United States. But some schools have developed effective programs to prevent young children born to immigrant families from becoming so-called long-term English learners. (Photo by Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA OCTOBER 3, 2014 -- Josephine Lopez, 84, from Perris Ca, joins immigrant-rights supporters celebrating the passage of AB 60, which will allow undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses starting in January 2015 on Friday October 3, 2014. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
GRANADA HILLS, CA - JANUARY 2, 2015: Immigrants without legal status line up to apply for California driver licenses at DMV offices January 2, 2015 in Granada Hills. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
GRANADA HILLS, CA - JANUARY 2, 2015: Immigrants without legal status line up to apply for California driver licenses at DMV offices January 2, 2015 in Granada Hills. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Children of poor migrant families receive backpacks filled with school supplies before the start of the new school year during a charity event at the Los Angeles Mission's 'skid row' headquarters on August 9, 2014. US conservatives recently commented on the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's 'war on poverty' to dispute the effectiveness of existing policies, and urge a welfare state overhaul. Five decades and trillions of dollars after President Johnson waged his war on poverty they said a staggering 49 million Americans are still living below the poverty line AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Immigrant rights activist Mary Estrada (R) speaks with anti-immigration activists during a protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA OCTOBER 3, 2014 -- Axel Paredes, 40, an immigrant (undocumented) worker who has been in the US for 10 years celebrates with supporters the passage of AB 60, which will allow undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses starting in January 2015 outside city hall Friday, October 3, 2014.. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Children hold banners and placards while listening to speakers at a rally outside the 9th Circuit federal court in Pasadena, California on July 16, 2015, where Immigrant rights organizations, labor, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients from Arizona and Los Angeles gathered. After a multiple-year legal battle, the state of Arizona's embattled efforts to deny driver's licenses to immigrants who have been granted DACA under a federal program will face what could be yet another blow to Arizona when the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit hears oral arguments this Thursday in a lawsuit brought by civil rights groups challenging the discriminatory policy. AFP PHOTO/ FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA FEB. 17, 2015: Immigration reform supporters listen to speakers talk about expanded federal immigration programs that will allow millions of immigrants to stay in the country and receive work permits for three years at Los Angeles City Hall Monday, Feb. 17, 2015. Los Angeles City Councilman Gil Cedillo joined Rep. Judy Chu and others to talk about expanded federal immigration programs that will allow millions of immigrants to stay in the country and receive work permits for three years. One of the programs, which applies to people who arrived in the country as children under the age of 16, will be expanded on Wednesday. (Photo by Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Immigrant Jose Montes attends an event on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, DACA and Deferred Action for Parental Accountability, DAPA, part of the immigration relief program, downtown Los Angeles Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. The White House promised an appeal Tuesday after a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration and gave a coalition of 26 states time to pursue a lawsuit aiming to permanently stop the orders. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Public officials and immigration reform advocates rally outside the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors headquarters after announcing the launching of the statewide campaign Ready California Tuesday, May 19, 2015. The effort aims to prepare immigrants about the immigration relief plans offered under alliesPresident Barack Obamaâs executive actions. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
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