ISIS has its own 24-hour tech support called 'Jihadi Help Desk'

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ISIS is taking its high-tech recruitment to new heights by offering a 24-hour "Jihadi Help Desk," according to NBC News.

The help desk is operated by around 6 senior members of ISIS, and is designed to help recruits (and others) understand how to use things like encryption and private messaging platforms.

"They answer questions from the technically mundane to the technically savvy to elevate the entire jihadi community to engage in global terror," Aaron Brantly, a counterterrorism analyst at the Combating Terrorism Center, told NBC News. "Clearly this enables them to communicate and engage in operations beyond what used to happen, and in a much more expeditious manner. They are now operating at the speed of cyberspace rather than the speed of person-to-person communications."

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ISIS has its own 24-hour tech support called 'Jihadi Help Desk'
A NYPD officer stands guard inside the Times Square subway station in New York on March 22, 2016, following a series of bombings claimed by the Islamic State group in Brussels, Belgium. Airports across Europe swiftly boosted security, while across the Atlantic, New York and Washington ordered security personnel to key areas. / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ/AFP/Getty Images)
New York Police Commissioner William Bratton (2nd-L) speaks to the media next to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (C) in New York, March 22, 2016, following a series of bombings claimed by the Islamic State group in Brussels, Belgium. Airports across Europe swiftly boosted security, while across the Atlantic, New York and Washington ordered security personnel to key areas. / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ/AFP/Getty Images)
UNION SQUARE PARK, NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES - 2016/03/22: In solidarity with the Belgian people, NYC residents held a candlelight vigil in Union Square Park to commemorate the victims of the bomb attacks in Brussels which claimed at least 30 lives and wounded over two hundred. (Photo by Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (C )walks inside Times Square subway station secured by police March 22, 2016, as securiy measures are tightened following a series of bombings claimed by the Islamic State group at the airport and a metro train in Brussels, Belgium, killing around 35 people in the latest attack to bring carnage to the heart of Europe. Airports across Europe swiftly boosted security, while across the Atlantic, New York and Washington ordered security personnel to key areas. / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ/AFP/Getty Images)
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (2nd-L) speaks with police officers on guard in the Times Square subway station in New York, March 22, 2016, as securiy measures have been tightened following a series of bombings claimed by the Islamic State group at the airport and a metro train in Brussels, Belgium, killing around 35 people in the latest attack to bring carnage to the heart of Europe. Airports across Europe swiftly boosted security, while across the Atlantic, New York and Washington ordered security personnel to key areas. / AFP / EDUARDO MUNOZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 22: Heavily armed police patrol the streets in lower Manhattan following a heightened terror alert after attacks in the Belgian capital of Brussels on March 22, 2016 in New York City. Dozens are thought to have been killed after numerous bombs were set off at the Brussels airport and Metro. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 22: Heavily armed police patrol the streets in lower Manhattan following a heightened terror alert after attacks in the Belgian capital of Brussels on March 22, 2016 in New York City. Dozens are thought to have been killed after numerous bombs were set off at the Brussels airport and Metro. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 22: Heavily armed police patrol the streets in lower Manhattan following a heightened terror alert after attacks in the Belgian capital of Brussels on March 22, 2016 in New York City. Dozens are thought to be killed after numerous bombs were set off at the Brussels airport and Metro. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A heavily armed New York city police officer with the Strategic Response Group stands guard at the armed forces recruiting center in New York's Times Square, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Police in New York say they've deployed extra units to crowded areas of the city "out of an abundance of caution" in the wake of the attacks in Paris, France. A New York Police Department statement released Friday stressed police have "no indication that the attack has any nexus to New York City." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Heavily armed New York city police officers with the Strategic Response Group stand guard in New York's Times Square, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Police in New York say they've deployed extra units to crowded areas of the city "out of an abundance of caution" in the wake of the attacks in Paris, France. A New York Police Department statement released Friday stressed police have "no indication that the attack has any nexus to New York City." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Heavily armed New York city police officers with the Strategic Response Group stand guard at the armed forces recruiting center in New York's Times Square, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Police in New York say they've deployed extra units to crowded areas of the city "out of an abundance of caution" in the wake of the attacks in Paris, France. A New York Police Department statement released Friday stressed police have "no indication that the attack has any nexus to New York City." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Heavily armed New York city police officers with the Strategic Response Group patrol New York's Times Square, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Police in New York say they've deployed extra units to crowded areas of the city "out of an abundance of caution" in the wake of the attacks in Paris, France. A New York Police Department statement released Friday stressed police have "no indication that the attack has any nexus to New York City." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Police officers stand guard in Times Square, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, in New York. The New York Police Department says it's aware of a newly released Islamic State group video showing images of Times Square but says there's no current or specific threat to the city. (AP Photo/Michael Balsamo)
In this photo provided by WNYW Fox 5 NY, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks during a news conference in New York's Times Square, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. The New York Police Department says it's aware of a newly released Islamic State group video showing images of Times Square but says there's no current or specific threat to the city. (WNYW Fox 5 NY via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT; NEW YORK OUT; NEW JERSEY OUT; TELEVISION OUT
NYPD officers stand guard at the 9/11 memorial in New York on November 16, 2015, during a vigil for the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks. A series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people and injured 352 in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: The first deployment of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton announced the formation of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau in order to respond to terrorist threats like the recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton announces the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton announces the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPDÃs new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton (right) announces the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announces the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton (right) announces the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau, while New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (left) listens, on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: The first deployment of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton announced the formation of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau in order to respond to terrorist threats like the recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Police officers await the announcement, by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton, of the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPD's new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: A New York Police Department officer stands guard outside of the 9/11 Memorial following a series of terrorist attacks in the French capital on November 14, 2015 in New York City. Security in New York City has increased following the a coordinated assault on Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for that left at least 120 people killed and over 200 injured, 80 of which seriously. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: New York Police Department officers stand guard outside of the 9/11 Memorial following a series of terrorist attacks in the French capital on November 14, 2015 in New York City. Security in New York City has increased following the a coordinated assault on Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for that left at least 120 people killed and over 200 injured, 80 of which seriously. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 16: New York City Police officers await the announcement, by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton, of the formation of the NYPD Critical Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Randall's Island November 16, 2015 in New York City. Following the announcement was the first deployment of the NYPDÃs new Critical Response Command of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau trained to respond to terrorist threats like the most recent attack in Paris. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: Bomb detection dogs stand with security personnel outside of the 9/11 Memorial following a series of terrorist attacks in the French capital on November 14, 2015 in New York City. Security in New York City has increased following the a coordinated assault on Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for that left at least 120 people killed and over 200 injured, 80 of which seriously. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
New York Police Department (NYPD) officers patrol the subway at Times Square in New York November 14, 2015, the morning after the attacks that killed at least 128 people in Paris. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Commuters make their way through the New York Police Department (NYPD) officers as they gather before they begin to patrol the subway at Times Square in New York November 14, 2015, the morning after the attacks that killed at least 128 people in Paris. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: A police officer patrols the Times Square subway stop with his dog following a series of terrorist attacks in Paris on November 14, 2015 in New York City. Security in New York City has increased following the coordinated assault on Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for. At least 120 people have been killed and over 200 injured, 80 of which seriously. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 14: Bomb detection dog stands with security personnel outside of the 9/11 Memorial following a series of terrorist attacks in the French capital on November 14, 2015 in New York City. Security in New York City has increased following the a coordinated assault on Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for that left at least 120 people killed and over 200 injured, 80 of which seriously. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
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Brantly says the five or six help desk operatives have at least college or masters level training in information technology. And they have other helpers all over the world assisting them in various capacities.

"You can kind of get a sense of where they are by when they say they are signing off to participate in the [Muslim] call to prayer,'' which traditionally occurs at five specific times a day, Brantly said. "They are very decentralized. They are operating in virtually every region of the world."

Bringing new recruits and less tech-savvy members up to speed on the latest privacy technologies is a way for ISIS to minimize the risk that a given plot will be discovered, or a network compromised.

In response to Anonymous' pledge to wage war on them, ISIS has been telling its followers to use Telegram, a popular messaging app that can send self-destructing messages, to communicate.

But one other unlikely source of privacy for ISIS is the Playstation 4. "The most difficult communication between these terrorists is via PlayStation 4," according to Belgium's home affairs minister Jan Jambon. "It's very, very difficult...to decrypt the communication that are done via PlayStation 4."

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