The Onion got it right in 2003 on the Iraq War

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Terrorism Expert: No Terror Group 'In Contemporary Life Can Compare' To IS


After the horrific attacks in Paris this past Friday, it's more than a little jarring to read a 2003 story from satire site The Onion about what would happen following the invasion of Iraq:

This war will not put an end to anti-Americanism; it will fan the flames of hatred even higher. It will not end the threat of weapons of mass destruction; it will make possible their further proliferation. And it will not lay the groundwork for the flourishing of democracy throughout the Mideast; it will harden the resolve of Arab states to drive out all Western (i.e. U.S.) influence.

The Onion nailed its prediction, which came as a thoughtful response meant to poke fun at a less thorough, pro-war column.

The Iraq War left the entire region in shambles, creating a power vacuum that resulted in the rise of ISIS, or the Islamic State, which has established a totalitarian "caliphate" in Iraq and Syria over the last few years.

ISIS has claimed responsibility for Friday evening's attacks in Paris.

Over a decade of bombings and drone strikes have created fertile ground for recruiting more young radicals, like 26-year-old Salah Abdeslam, believed to be the eighth attacker in Paris and currently the subject of an international manhunt.

See photos of the suspects in the Paris attacks:

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Suspects in the Paris attacks, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, Salah Abdeslam, Ahmad Almohammad
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The Onion got it right in 2003 on the Iraq War
This undated image made available in the Islamic State's English-language magazine Dabiq, shows Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. Abaaoud the Belgian jihadi suspected of masterminding deadly attacks in Paris was killed in a police raid on a suburban apartment building, the city prosecutor's office announced Thursday Nov. 1, 2015. Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins' office said 27-year-old Abdelhamid Abaaoud was identified based on skin samples. His body was found in the apartment building targeted in the chaotic and bloody raid in the Paris suburb of Saint-Denis on Wednesday. (Militant photo via AP)
This undated image made available in the Islamic State's English-language magazine Dabiq, shows Abdelhamid Abaaoud. Abaaoud, the child of Moroccan immigrants who grew up in the Belgian capital’s Molenbeek-Saint-Jean neighborhood, was identified by French authorities on Monday Nov. 16, 2015, as the presumed mastermind of the terror attacks last Friday in Paris that killed over a hundred people and injured hundreds more. (Militant Photo via AP)
This undated image taken from a Militant Website on Monday Nov. 16, 2015 showing Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A French official says Abdelhamid Abaaoud is the suspected mastermind of the Paris attacks was also linked to thwarted train and church attacks. (Militant video via AP)
Abdelhamid Abaaoud, suspected mastermind of the #ParisAttacks was "interviewed" in #ISIS's Dabiq magazine https://t.co/wSKmztFfn5
BREAKING: Third Bataclan attacker identified as Foued Mohamed-Aggad https://t.co/FYwEykV9Kp https://t.co/7g6vH7gvwH
This undated photo released late Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015, by Greece's migration policy ministry shows a registration photo from a document issued to 25-year old Ahmad Almohammad, holder of a Syrian passport found near a dead assailant in the scene of a Paris attack Friday. The document was issued on Sunday, Oct. 4 by authorities on the Greek island of Leros, where the man arrived a day earlier on a frail boat carrying migrants over from Turkey. It protects him from deportation for six months, and is the same documentation routinely issued to thousands of newly-arrived migrants. (Greek Migration Ministry via AP)
This undated photo released late Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015, by Greece's migration policy ministry shows a document issued to 25-year old Ahmad Almohammad, holder of a Syrian passport found near a dead assailant in the scene of a Paris attack Friday. The document was issued on Sunday, Oct. 4 by authorities on the Greek island of Leros, where the man arrived a day earlier on a frail boat carrying migrants over from Turkey. It protects him from deportation for six months, and is the same documentation routinely issued to thousands of newly-arrived migrants. On the right is a copy of his fingerprints, taken on Saturday, Oct. 3. (Greek Migration Policy Ministry via AP)

This undated file photo provided by French Police shows 26-year old Salah Abdeslam, who is wanted by police in connection with recent terror attacks in Paris, as police investigations continue Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. French police released the wanted notice and photo of the suspect on the run since the attacks in Paris on Friday. The notice, released on the France National Police Twitter account, says anyone seeing Salah Abdeslam, should consider him dangerous. (Police Nationale via AP)

This undated file photo released Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, by French Police shows 26-year old Salah Abdeslam, who is wanted by police in connection with recent terror attacks in Paris, as police investigations continue. The notice, released on the national police Twitter account, says anyone seeing Salah Abdeslam, should consider him dangerous and call authorities immediately. The notice reads in French: "Call for witnesses - Police are hunting a suspect : Salah Abdeslam, born on Sept. 15, 1989 Brussels, Belgium. ...Dangerous individual don't intervene yourself". (Police Nationale via AP)
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The Onion continued:

If you thought Osama bin Laden was bad, just wait until the countless children who become orphaned by U.S. bombs in the coming weeks are all grown up. Do you think they will forget what country dropped the bombs that killed their parents? In 10 or 15 years, we will look back fondly on the days when there were only a few thousand Middle Easterners dedicated to destroying the U.S. and willing to die for the fundamentalist cause. From this war, a million bin Ladens will bloom.

As French President François Hollande ramps up airstrikes in Syria, The Onion story has never been more important.

Read the whole thing at The Onion.

NOW WATCH: 'Frontline' just showed a side of Syria that Americans never see

RELATED: See the U.S. presence in Iraq over the years

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US troops in Iraq (u.s.) updated
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The Onion got it right in 2003 on the Iraq War
TAJI, IRAQ - APRIL 12: A U.S. Army trainer (L), instructs Iraqi Army recruits at a military base on April 12, 2015 in Taji, Iraq. U.S. forces, currently operating in 5 large bases throught Iraq, are training thousands of Iraqi Army combat troops, trying to rebuild a force they had origninally trained before the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2010. Members of the U.S. Army's 5-73 CAV, 3BCT, 82nd Airborne Division are teaching members of the newly-formed 15th Division of the Iraqi Army, as the Iraqi government launches offensives to try to recover territory lost to ISIS last year. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
TAJI, IRAQ - APRIL 12: Iraqi Army recruits listen to a U.S. Army trainer (R), at a military base on April 12, 2015 in Taji, Iraq. U.S. forces, currently operating in 5 large bases throught the country, are training thousands of Iraqi Army combat troops, trying to rebuild a force they had origninally trained before the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2010. Members of the U.S. Army's 5-73 CAV, 3BCT, 82nd Airborne Division are teaching members of the newly-formed 15th Division of the Iraqi Army, as the Iraqi government launches offensives to try to recover territory lost to ISIS last year. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
TAJI, IRAQ - APRIL 12: A U.S. Army trainer (R), instructs an Iraqi Army recruit at a military base on April 12, 2015 in Taji, Iraq. U.S. forces, currently operating in 5 large bases throught the country, are training thousands of Iraqi Army combat troops, trying to rebuild a force they had origninally trained before the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2010. Members of the U.S. Army's 5-73 CAV, 3BCT, 82nd Airborne Division are teaching members of the newly-formed 15th Division of the Iraqi Army, as the Iraqi government launches offensives to try to recover territory lost to ISIS last year. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
American military trainers show Iraqi soldiers how to use American weapons during a training session at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops, located 30 kilometres north of the capital Baghdad on January 7, 2015. American and allied soldiers are aiming to rapidly train thousands of Iraqi security personnel in the 'bare minimum basics' needed to join the fight against militants who swept Baghdad's troops aside. The first round of training is just getting underway at the massive Taji base complex north of Baghdad, one of five planned training sites. AFP PHOTO/ AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
CAMP BUEHRING, KUWAIT - DECEMBER 08: U.S. troops stand at attention next to a Abrams tank waiting for the arrival of Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, December 8, 2014 at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. Secretary Hagel visited the camp which once was a staging post for troops headed to Iraq. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TAJI, IRAQ - APRIL 12: A U.S. Army trainer (L), speaks with an Iraqi Army officer at a military base on April 12, 2015 in Taji, Iraq. U.S. forces, currently operating in 5 large bases throught Iraq, are training thousands of Iraqi Army combat troops, trying to rebuild a force they had origninally trained before the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2010. Members of the U.S. Army's 5-73 CAV, 3BCT, 82nd Airborne Division are teaching members of the newly-formed 15th Division of the Iraqi Army, as the Iraqi government launches offensives to try to recover territory lost to ISIS last year. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
American trainers take a break as they train Iraqi soldier on approaching and clearing buildings at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located north of the capital Baghdad, on January 7, 2015. Taji is one of an eventual five sites from which the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP/ PHOTO/AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
American and Iraqi trainers watch on as an Iraqi soldier rebuilds his weapon at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located north of the capital Baghdad, on January 7, 2015. Taji is one of an eventual five sites from which the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP/ PHOTO/AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
An American military trainer instructs Iraqi soldier during an exercise on approaching and clearing buildings at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located north of the capital Baghdad, on January 7, 2015. Taji is one of an eventual five sites from which the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP PHOTO/ AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
An American military trainer instructs an Iraqi soldier during an exercise on approaching and clearing buildings at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located north of the capital Baghdad, on January 7, 2015. Taji is one of an eventual five sites from which the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP PHOTO/ AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - DECEMBER 09: U.S. troops are silhouetted as they listen to U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speak during a visit to Baghdad International Airport, December 9, 2014 in Baghdad, Iraq. Secretary Hagel later met with Iraqi military officials and Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY W.G. DUNLOP An American soldier stands guard at the Taji base complex which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located thirty kilometres north of the capital Baghdad on December 29, 2014. Taji is one of an eventual five sites where the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP PHOTO / ALI AL-SAADI (Photo credit should read ALI AL-SAADI/AFP/Getty Images)
An American trainer instructs an Iraqi soldier on approaching and clearing buildings at the Taji base complex, which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located north of the capital Baghdad, on January 7, 2015. Taji is one of an eventual five sites from which the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP/ PHOTO/AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
CAMP BUEHRING, KUWAIT - DECEMBER 08: U.S. troops listen to Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speak during a visit, December 8, 2014 at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. Secretary Hagel visited the camp which once was a staging post for troops headed to Iraq. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY W.G DUNLOP A US soldier stands in front of graffiti painted on concrete blast walls at the Taji base complex which hosts Iraqi and US troops and is located thirty kilometres north of the capital Baghdad, on December 29, 2014. Taji is one of an eventual five sites where the US and allied countries aim to train 5,000 Iraqi military personnel every six to eight weeks for combat against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group. AFP PHOTO / ALI AL-SAADI (Photo credit should read ALI AL-SAADI/AFP/Getty Images)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - DECEMBER 09: U.S. troops listen to U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speak during a visit to Baghdad International Airport, December 9, 2014 in Baghdad, Iraq. Secretary Hagel later met with Iraqi military officials and Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - DECEMBER 09: U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speaks to troops stationed at Baghdad International Airport, December 9, 2014 in Baghdad, Iraq. Secretary Hagel later met with Iraqi military officials and Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
An F/A-18C hornet pilot poses on the flight deck of the US navy aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush on August 15, 2014 in the Gulf. The US aircraft carrier is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the US 5th Fleet area of responsibility. AFP PHOTO/MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images)
KHAZIR FRONTLINE, KRG, IRAQ - 2014/08/26: An American Humvee is potionned on the Khazir Frontline. It was captured from ISIS militants by Peshmerga soldiers. Khazir refugee camp is located outside Kalak, a town halfway on the road between Erbil and Mosul. It was overrun by ISIS militants on the 7th of August following an unprecedented push of the Caliphate into Kurdish territory. Its thousands of Iraqi and Arab refugees were forced to flee again as the now deserted camp has become the new frontline between the Peshmerga and ISIS. It is the theatre of frequent U.S. airstrikes that have helped halt the ISIS advance into a stalemate situation. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
A Kurdish Peshmerga fighter, with an image of the US flag sewn onto his shirt sleeve, stands next to an ambulance destroyed due to an improvised explosive device (IED) in Hossein, during the clashes on the road to Jalawla, on August 23, 2014. The United States launched an air campaign against IS in Iraq on April 8, and has since carried out more than 90 strikes that have largely been in support of Kurdish forces in the north, drawing calls for operations elsewhere in the country. AFP PHOTO / JM LOPEZ (Photo credit should read JM LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
MAKHMOUR, KRG, IRAQ - 2014/08/18: A Peshmerga soldier looks away from the top of an American MRAP vehicle while the Kurdish flags floats. Makhmour is a town 50 kilometers South of Erbil, the capital of the Kurdistan Regional Government. After an ISIS offensive, the town fell to the Caliphate on the 8th of August but taken back by the Peshmerga and PKK fighters on August 10. All people deserted the town and only 10% decided to return. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
The last convoy of solders from the US Army's 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division crosses the border from Iraq into Kuwait, Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011. The brigade's special troops battalion are the last American soldiers to leave Iraq. The U.S. military announced Saturday night that the last American troops have left Iraq as the nearly nine-year war ends. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
A soldier gestures from the gun turret of the last vehicle in a convoy of the US Army's 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division crosses the border from Iraq into Kuwait, Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011. The brigade's special troops battalion are the last American soldiers to leave Iraq. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
A US Army soldier photographs the last vehicle to leave Iraq at Camp Virginia, Kuwait, Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011. The U.S. military announced Saturday night that the last American troops have left Iraq as the nearly nine-year war ends. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
Soldiers from the last US unit to leave Iraq, 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, based at Fort Hood, Texas, line up to turn in their weapons after arriving at Camp Virginia, Kuwait, Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011. The U.S. military announced Saturday night that the last American troops have left Iraq as the nearly nine-year war ends. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
Specialist Dante Battle from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division secures the perimeter outside of a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle on the way to cross the Kuwaiti border as part of the last U.S. military convoy to leave Iraq Sunday Dec. 18, 2011. The last convoy of U.S. soldiers pulled out of Iraq on Sunday, ending nearly nine years of war that cost almost 4,500 American and tens of thousands of Iraqi lives and left a country still grappling with political uncertainty. (AP Photo/Lucas Jackson, Pool)
Staff Sergeant Prince House from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division rides in a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle on the way to cross the Kuwaiti border as part of the last U.S. military convoy to leave Iraq Sunday Dec.18, 2011. The last convoy of U.S. soldiers pulled out of Iraq on Sunday, ending nearly nine years of war that cost almost 4,500 American and tens of thousands of Iraqi lives and left a country still grappling with political uncertainty. (AP Photo/Lucas Jackson, Pool)
Soldiers with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division pose with a U.S. flag outside their Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle before leaving Camp Adder to travel with the last U.S. military convoy to leave Iraq Sunday Dec.18, 2011. The last convoy of U.S. soldiers pulled out of Iraq on Sunday, ending nearly nine years of war that cost almost 4,500 American and tens of thousands of Iraqi lives and left a country still grappling with political uncertainty. (AP Photo/Lucas Jackson, Pool)
In this Dec. 17, 2011 photo, soldiers from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, attend a casing of the colors ceremony by handwritten names of soldiers at Camp Adder, now known as Imam Ali Base, near Nasiriyah, Iraq. Around 500 troops from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division ended their presence on Camp Adder, the last remaining American base, and departed in the final American military convoy out of Iraq, arriving into Kuwait in the early morning hours of Dec. 18. (AP Photo/Mario Tama, Pool)
Soldiers from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division salute during a re-enlistment ceremony for Staff Sergeant Brant Smith, from Dothan, Alabama, while preparing to depart in the last convoy from Iraq at Camp Adder, now known as Imam Ali Base, on Saturday Dec. 17, 2011, near Nasiriyah, Iraq. Smith re-enlisted for three years of service at the ceremony which he wanted to hold at the staging area for the last convoy. Around 500 troops from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division ended their presence at Camp Adder, the last remaining American base, and departed in the final American military convoy out of Iraq, arriving into Kuwait in the early morning hours of December 18, 2011. (AP Photo / Mario Tama)
US Army soldiers stand during ceremonies marking the end of US military mission in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011. After nearly nine years, 4,500 American dead, 32,000 wounded and more than $800 billion, U.S. officials formally shut down the war in Iraq a conflict that U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said was worth the price in blood and money, as it set Iraq on a path to democracy. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)
U.S. service members play basketball at Camp Virginia in Kuwait, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011. After nearly nine years, 4,500 American dead and 100,000 Iraqi dead, U.S. officials formally shut down the war in Iraq - a conflict that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said was worth the American sacrifice because it set Iraq on a path to democracy. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2011 file photo, Sgt. Howard Acoff hugs his family as U.S. Army 1st Cavalry 3rd Brigade soldiers return home from deployment in Iraq at Fort Hood, Texas. These 3rd Brigade troops were in the last convoy to leave Iraq, as U.S. soldiers withdrew from the country. For now, there are no plans to hold a huge ticker-tape parade for troops returning from Iraq, no arrangements for a grand, flag-waving, red-white-and-blue homecoming of the sort America’s fighting men and women received after World War II and the Gulf War. Instead, most welcomes have been smaller-scale: hugs from families at military posts across the country, a somber commemoration by President Barack Obama at Fort Bragg. (AP Photo/Erich Schlegel, File)
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