Charlie Hebdo strikes back after latest Paris attacks

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Charlie Hebdo Responds To Paris Attacks

France's Charlie Hebdo journal, the target of lethal attacks by Islamist militants last January, defended party-goers over gun-toters in a new edition following Friday's Paris assault.

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The satirical weekly, which hit world headlines when gunmen killed 12 people in an attack on its Paris offices last January, published a front-page cartoon contrasting Islamist gunmen and Western revelers.

"They have weapons. Screw them. We have champagne," read the headline accompanying a front-page drawing where drink consumed by a youthful fun-lover sprays back out of a torso peppered with bullet holes.

See the Eiffel Tower standing dark following the attacks in Paris:

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Eiffel Tower stands dark following Paris attacks
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Charlie Hebdo strikes back after latest Paris attacks
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: The Eiffel Tower turns off its lights in memory of the more than 120 victims the day after the terrorist attack on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: Armed police stand guard overlooking the Eiffel Tower which was kept dark in honor of those who died in the terrorist attacks yesterday, November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. France declared a national state of emergency after at least 129 people were killed in coordinated terror attacks throughout the French capital. (Photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
A picture taken on November 14, 2015 shows the Eiffel Tower with its lights turned off following the deadly attacks in Paris. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. The Eiffel Tower was closed, the Champs-Elysees was lifeless and museums, markets and schools were shuttered today as Paris reeled after the bloodiest terror attack in French history. AFP PHOTO / ALAIN JOCARD (Photo credit should read ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: The Eiffel Tower is kept dark in honor of those who died in the terrorist attacks yesterday, November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. France declared a national state of emergency after at least 129 people were killed in coordinated terror attacks throughout the French capital. (Photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 15: The Eiffel Tower is seen after turned off its lights in respect for the victims of France terror attacks, on November 14, 2015. The Eiffel Tower has been closed indefinitely following the wave of deadly attacks in Paris. 129 people were killed and 352 others injured -- 99 of them in critical condition -- after the terror attacks in Paris on 13 November. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A picture taken on November 14, 2015 shows the Eiffel Tower with its lights turned off following the deadly attacks in Paris. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ALAIN JOCARD (Photo credit should read ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 15: The Eiffel Tower is seen after turned off its lights in respect for the victims of France terror attacks, on November 14, 2015. The Eiffel Tower has been closed indefinitely following the wave of deadly attacks in Paris. 129 people were killed and 352 others injured -- 99 of them in critical condition -- after the terror attacks in Paris on 13 November. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: The Eiffel Tower goes dark following a series of terrorist attacks in the French capital on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. At least 120 people were killed and over 200 injured, 80 seriously, after a coordinated series of attacks in Paris which ISIS claimed responsibility for. (Photo by Xavier Laine/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: The Eiffel Tower turns off its lights in memory of the more than 120 victims the day after the terrorist attack on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 15: The Eiffel Tower is seen after turned off its lights in respect for the victims of France terror attacks, on November 14, 2015. The Eiffel Tower has been closed indefinitely following the wave of deadly attacks in Paris. 129 people were killed and 352 others injured -- 99 of them in critical condition -- after the terror attacks in Paris on 13 November. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 14: The Eiffel Tower turns off its lights in memory of the more than 120 victims the day after the terrorist attack on November 14, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
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The edition was the first since Friday's attackers killed at least 129 people who were sharing a drink on the terraces of Paris cafes or joining a rock concert in the Bataclan hall.

Europe's deadliest attack in a decade, claimed by the Islamic State group that now controls swathes of Syria and Iraq, came 10 months after the attacks in which Islamist gunmen killed 17 people in Paris, several at a Kosher shop but most of them at the Charlie Hebdo offices.

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The journal, which some see as crassly insensitive and others as an icon of free speech, lost many of the legendary cartoonists who regularly lampooned Islam along with other religions in the Jan 7. attacks.

Its circulation and international notoriety sky-rocketed after the attacks but it is currently struggling to overcome the tragedy. It was saved from financial ruin by a sympathy-driven spike in subscriptions earlier this year.

(Reporting by Brian Love; Editing by Ruth Pitchford)

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