Daycare workers reportedly fired after refusing to accept transgender child

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The Children's Lighthouse Learning Center in Katy, Texas lost two employees recently after reports state they refused to address a transgender child by his preferred gender identity.

SEE ALSO: Transgender veteran's selfie sends powerful message to society

Former daycare center manager, Madeline Kirksey and co-worker, Akesha Wyatt have since filed a lawsuit against the daycare center because they feel their religious belief has been discriminated against.



According to local ABC affiliate, KTRK, "both women were fired two weeks ago after a six-year-old child returned to the daycare with his parents saying he identified as a boy, but both Kirksey and Wyatt refused to call him by his chosen name."

A Christian author and blogger, Kirksey reportedly feels that the boy's parents, who are a gay couple, are forcing the issue of gender onto their child.

Kirksey and Wyatt claim their Christian rights have been infringed upon, and that Kirksey "was sacrificed on the altar of political correctness," according to her attorney.

In Merlo, Argentina, 8-year-old Luana had to fight for the right to be a girl. Now, she finally feels she can be herself:

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Daycare workers reportedly fired after refusing to accept transgender child
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana poses for a picture at her home in Merlo, Argentina. Luana had to fight to be a girl. The 8-year-old was born a boy, and struggled with a world that insisted that this was what she must be. Then, in 2013, she became the youngest person to take advantage of a progressive Argentine law that allows people to identify their own gender for legal purposes. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana hides behind her photo album at her home in Merlo, Argentina. Luana, who was born a boy, says she remembers her mom trying to make her a boy. Gabriela Mansilla, her mother, says the male reinforcement destroyed their family life. Manuel frequently banged his head against the wall. Patches of hair fell out. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana embraces her mother Gabriela Mansilla at home in Merlo, Argentina. Mansilla says there were always clear differences in her identical twins. Manuel, Luanaâs birth name, wore shirts on his head, apparently imitating long hair. He liked dolls. Princesses and mermaids were his favorite movie characters. Among his first words: âI girl.â (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana dances in her room wearing a costume dress from the Elsa character in the Frozen cartoon at her home in Merlo, Argentina. By the time Luana, born Manuel, was 2, he was rejecting pants and insisting on wearing dresses. The struggles were so exhausting that sometimes his mother Gabriela Mansilla simply consented. âPeople in the neighborhood would call me âthe crazy lady who dresses up her kid,ââ said Mansilla. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana poses for a portrait with her dolls at her home in Merlo, Argentina. When Luana and her identical twin brother were 3, a team of psychologists and doctors prescribed a regimen of ìmale reinforcementî for Manuel, who lives as a girl. He would only be allowed to play with male toys like action figures and wear boysí clothes. The color pink was prohibited, as were cartoons with female protagonists. When he was five Manuel started calling himself Luana. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana, who was born a boy and named Manuel, sits with her identical twin bother Elias outside their home in Merlo, Argentina. âIâve always been a girl,â said Luana, flashing a smile at Elias. He nods. âIf you gave Luana all my toys it would not make any difference,â Elias said. âShe still wouldnât be a boy.â (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana poses for photos on her roller skates at her home in Merlo, Argentina. Luana says that when one of the girls asked her why she had a penis, a friend jumped in. âSheâs transsexual,â the child explained, nonchalantly. That level of comfort is no doubt in part because Luana herself appears so at ease. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana plays with her dolls at her home in Merlo, Argentina. Luana, born a boy and named Manuel, remembers a lady in a toy store who told her the doll she had picked out was "for girls." And in daycare, when the children had to line up, the teachers forced her to go with the boys. "Everybody told me, "No. Get in the line for boys," said Luana, whose two front teeth are coming in. "I didn't listen." (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
In this Sept. 29, 2015 photo, Luana, front, and her twin bother Elias play outside their home in Merlo, Argentina. Luana, who was born a boy named Manuel, lives as a girl, and has become an international symbol of progress in the transgender community. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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