US, Mexico sign deal on sharing satellite data directly

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MEXICO CITY (AP) — The United States and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite.

The agreement means Mexico will get the information immediately instead of waiting for filtered data to be released by U.S. authorities.

Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes.

U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell says Mexico joins about a half-dozen other countries that are already downloading such data directly from U.S. satellites.

Jewell and Eduardo Sojo, president of Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography, signed the agreement Friday in the Mexican capital.

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US, Mexico sign deal on sharing satellite data directly
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, left, shakes hands with Eduardo Sojo, president of INEGI, Mexicoâs National Institute of Statistics and Geography, after signing an agreement to share satellite data between the U.S. and Mexico, at the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, right, claps alongside South Africaâs Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor, center, and European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation Carlos Moedas, at the opening session of the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell shakes hands with Eduardo Sojo, president of INEGI, Mexicoâs National Institute of Statistics and Geography, after signing an agreement to share satellite data between the U.S. and Mexico, at the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell speaks during a press conference following the opening session of the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, seated left, and Eduardo Sojo, president of INEGI, Mexicoâs National Institute of Statistics and Geography, sign an agreement to share satellite data between the U.S. and Mexico, at the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Officials say that will allow the country to better track environmental change, as well as improve monitoring and preparation for phenomena such as hurricanes. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Mexicoâs Environment Minister Rafael Pacchiano listens during the opening session of the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Panel members participate in the opening session of the 2015 Ministerial Summit of the Group on Earth Observations, in Mexico City, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. The U.S. and Mexico have signed a deal for Mexico to receive land-surface imagery and data directly from a U.S.-operated satellite. Seated from left, are, Chinaâs Vice Minister of Science and Technology Jianlin Cao; European Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation Carlos Moedas; South Africaâs Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor; U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; Mexicoâs Environment Minister Rafael Pacchiano; Eduardo Sojo, president of INEGI, Mexicoâs National Institute of Statistics and Geography; Maria Eugenia Casar, executive director of AMEXCID, the Mexican agency of international cooperation for development; Enrique Cabrero, general director of CONACYT, the national science and technology council; Barbara Ryan, director of the Group on Earth Observations Secretariat. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
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