U.S. Secret Service officer arrested in child sexting sting

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A U.S. Secret Service officer assigned to the White House was arrested this week after he sent naked pictures of himself to someone he thought was a 14-year-old girl, according to a criminal complaint.

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Lee Robert Moore, 37, of Church Hill, Maryland, turned himself in to Maryland State Police on Monday and faces charges including solicitation of a minor, according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Delaware.

The complaint details a series of pornographic online chats starting in late August between Moore and a Delaware State Police detective posing as a 14-year-old girl.

Scandals connected to the Secret Service this year:

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U.S. Secret Service officer arrested in child sexting sting
A receipt from Fado Irish Pub & Restaurant is displayed on a television screen during the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on U.S. Secret Service accountability for March 4, 2015 incident, Thursday, May 14, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen)
House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah speaks at the start of a hearing on Secret Service accountability for a March 4, 2015 incident, Thursday, May 14, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. For months new Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy had been warning agents and officers that misconduct and drunken shenanigans would not be tolerated in the once-vaunted law enforcement agency. And yet, according to investigators, two senior Secret Service agents spent five hours at a bar, ran up a significant tab, and then drove back to the White House, where they shoved their car into a construction barrier and drove within inches of a suspicious package earlier this year. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen))
House Oversight and Government Reform Committee member Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 14, 2015, during the committee's hearing on U.S. Secret Service accountability for March 4, 2015 incident. For months new Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy had been warning agents and officers that misconduct and drunken shenanigans would not be tolerated in the once-vaunted law enforcement agency. And yet, according to investigators, two senior Secret Service agents spent five hours at a bar, ran up a significant tab, and then drove back to the White House, where they shoved their car into a construction barrier and drove within inches of a suspicious package earlier this year. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen)
House Oversight and Government Reform Committee member Rep. Glenn Grothman, R-Wis., looks at his phone during the committee's hearing on U.S. Secret Service accountability for March 4, 2015 incident, Thursday, May 14, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen)
House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah speaks at the start of a hearing on Secret Service accountability for a March 4, 2015 incident, Thursday, May 14, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. For months new Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy had been warning agents and officers that misconduct and drunken shenanigans would not be tolerated in the once-vaunted law enforcement agency. And yet, according to investigators, two senior Secret Service agents spent five hours at a bar, ran up a significant tab, and then drove back to the White House, where they shoved their car into a construction barrier and drove within inches of a suspicious package earlier this year. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen)

U.S. Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies during a hearing before the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee March 17, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Director Clancy faced tough questions from lawmakers regarding the recent misconduct scandal as the subcommittee held a hearing to examine the budget for the Security Service.

Photo Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Uniformed US Secret Service officers patrol Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, DC, March 12, 2015. The US Secret Service is investigating claims that some of its agents crashed a car into White House security barriers after a night out, The Washington Post reported March 11. The Secret Service was not immediately available to confirm the report, but spokesman Brian Leary told the Post that the probe would be conducted by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general.

Photo Credit:  JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

An uniformed US Secret Service officer (C) patrols Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, DC, March 12, 2015 as a man takes a selfie. The US Secret Service is investigating claims that some of its agents crashed a car into White House security barriers after a night out, The Washington Post reported March 11. The Secret Service was not immediately available to confirm the report, but spokesman Brian Leary told the Post that the probe would be conducted by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general. 

Photo credit: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Barricades stand in front of the White House on March 12, 2015 in Washington, DC. Officials are Investigating allegations that two senior Secret Service agents drove a government car into White House security barricades after drinking at a late night party last week.

Photo credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 12: Melting snow and barricades sit in front of the White House on March 12, 2015 in Washington, DC. Officials are Investigating allegations that two senior Secret Service agents drove a government car into White House security barricades after drinking at a late night party last week. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 12: Members of the US Secret Service stand watch in front of the White House on March 12, 2015 in Washington, DC. Officials are Investigating allegations that two senior Secret Service agents drove a government car into White House security barricades after drinking at a late night party last week. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Moore sent naked photos of himself to the undercover officer and asked to meet in person to have sex, according to the complaint.

In an interview with police, Moore admitted to communicating with the person while he was working at the White House, the complaint said.

The Secret Service, the agency that protects the president, has placed Moore on administrative leave, according to the complaint. The Secret Service did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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It was not clear from the complaint whether Moore has retained an attorney.

Moore's arrest is the latest blow to the Secret Service after a series of scandals and security lapses.

In March, two senior agents, after a night of drinking, drove into a White House barricade inches away from a suspicious package that was being investigated as a possible bomb.

Last year, agents failed to stop a knife-carrying man from jumping a fence and running into the White House in one of the worst security breaches since President Barack Obama took office in 2009.

(Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Chris Reese)

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