Photographers capture landmarks, skylines for Blue Angels

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Photographers capture landmarks, skylines for Blue Angels
This July 17, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Navy shows the cockpit view of the Blue Angels in formation during a practice flight in Hillsboro, OR. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Andrea Perez/U.S. Navy via AP)
In this May 26, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the Blue Angels perform over Boston, MA. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Terrence Siren/U.S. Navy via AP)
In this June 14, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the Blue Angels performs in Ocean City, MD. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Andrea Perez/U.S. Navy via AP)
This Dec. 13, 2013 photo taken by the U.S. Navy, shows the Blue Angels during a performance near the One World Trade Center in New York. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Terrence Siren/U.S. Navy via AP)
In this Oct. 24, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the Blue Angels perform in Jacksonville, Fla. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Andrea Perez/U.S. Navy via AP)
In this April 16, 2015 photo made available by the U.S. Navy, the Blue Angels, center, fly in formation with a U.S. Air Force P-47 Thunderbolt, left, and a F-22 Raptor, during an air show in Corpus Christi, TX. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Katy Holm/U.S. Navy via AP)
This June 4, 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Navy, shows an overhead view of one of the Blue Angels planes during an aerial show in Rockford, Il. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (Mike Lindsey/U.S. Navy via AP)
This Oct. 23, 2013 photo made available by the U.S. Navy shows photographer Terrence Siren assisted by crew chief Jared Mann, before a flight with the Blue Angels at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla. An elite group of Navy and Marine photographers are selected each year to travel the world with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight demonstration team. The photographers often ride with pilots and must be in top physical condition to make the team and have the skills to capture aerial maneuvers at speeds of up to 700 miles per hour. (U.S. Navy via AP)
In this March 4, 2015, photo, provided by the U.S. Navy, Navy photographers assigned to the Blue Angels squadron pose for a photo at an undisclosed location. They are: Terrence Siren, left, Andrea Perez, Mike Lindsey. Lt. Lynn Daniel, front, Jenn Lebron, right, and Katy Holm. The photographers, like the Blue Angels pilots, don't wear G suits in the air. They must learn learn breathing techniques and stay in good physical shape to keep from passing out. (U.S. Navy via AP)
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PENSACOLA NAVAL AIR STATION, Fla. (AP) — U.S. Navy fighter jet pilot Lt. Ryan Chamberlain has flown in war zones, logged more than 300 landings on aircraft carriers and thrilled millions since 2013 with breathtaking maneuvers as part of the Navy's elite Blue Angels demonstration squadron.

But Chamberlain says his career's most memorable moment came after he took detailed instructions from the petty officer riding in the backseat of his F-18 Hornet.

SEE ALSO: Chris Henderson of 3 Doors Down opens up about his time in the US Navy

Chamberlain and Navy photographer Terrence Siren flew over New York City with the Blue Angels in 2013, and Siren captured an iconic image of the blue and yellow jets streaking past One World Trade Center tower.

"I will always look back at that image. It captures what we do, what we are about," Chamberlain said.

Siren, an accomplished Navy combat photographer, will finish his tour of duty with the team in November. The New Orleans native is one of five photographers, all petty officers, assigned to the Blue Angels for three-year stints to capture images of the six-fighter jet team.

Siren said it took time for him to feel confident enough to make suggestions to the world's best pilots despite having been a photographer for the Navy Seals and making various tours as a combat photographer.

"At first, I was thinking 'There is another plane 6 inches from my head; I'm not going to talk to this guy,'" he said. "But during photo shoots, there is a constant communication going on because I cannot move the plane and he cannot move the camera."

During demonstrations, the team reaches speeds of 700 mph, and the pilots and photographers can experience 7.5 times normal gravity during spins, turns and other maneuvers. The g-forces make a 10-pound camera feel like 75 pounds.

Related: See photos of the Blue Angels from the ground:

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Photographers capture landmarks, skylines for Blue Angels
SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 02: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform a stadium flyover before the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Navy Midshipmen at Notre Dame Stadium on November 2, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 02: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform a stadium flyover before the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Navy Midshipmen at Notre Dame Stadium on November 2, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 02: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform a stadium flyover before the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Navy Midshipmen at Notre Dame Stadium on November 2, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 02: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform a stadium flyover before the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Navy Midshipmen at Notre Dame Stadium on November 2, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 02: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform a stadium flyover before the Notre Dame Fighting Irish take on the Navy Midshipmen at Notre Dame Stadium on November 2, 2013 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
KEY WEST, FL - MARCH 23: (NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau,the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels perform their precision aerobatics over the Florida Keys during the Southernmost Air Spectacular at Naval Air Station Key West on March 23, 2013, in Key West, Florida. The weekend air show concludes Sunday, March 24, and may mark the the last Blue Angels performance through the end of September 2013 due to sequester budget cuts. (Rob O'Neal/Florida Keys News Bureau via Getty Images)
KEY WEST, FL - MARCH 23: (NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau,the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels perform their precision aerobatics over the Florida Keys during the Southernmost Air Spectacular at Naval Air Station Key West on March 23, 2013, in Key West, Florida. The weekend air show concludes Sunday, March 24, and may mark the the last Blue Angels performance through the end of September 2013 due to sequester budget cuts. (Rob O'Neal/Florida Keys News Bureau via Getty Images)
KEY WEST, FL - MARCH 21: Lt. Nate Barton flies his Blue Angels fighter jet at left in formation during practice March 21, 2013 over the lower Florida Keys, Florida. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform during Naval Air Station Key West's free Southernmost Air Spectacular air show March 23 -24. (Photo by Rachel McMarr/U.S. Navy/Florida Keys News via Getty Images)
ANNAPOLIS, MD - MAY 29: U.S. Navy Blue Angels fly over graduation ceremonies at the U.S. Naval Academy May 29, 2012 in Annapolis, Maryland. U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta is the commencement speaker for the 1099 graduates of the class of 2012. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 23: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels fly in formation as they pass over the USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) on the Hudson River during the Parade of Ships for the start of Fleet Week May 23, 2012 in New York City. Fleet week, which has been held in New York City since 1984, celebrates the U.S. Navy and Marines Corps with a week of ship visitations and military demonstrations. Fleet Week concludes on Memorial Day with a military flyover to honor those killed while serving in the military. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)
ANNAPOLIS, MD - MAY 28: United States Naval Academy graduates stand and cheer for the Navy's Blue Angels during their graduation ceremony at the academy May 28, 2010 in Annapolis, Maryland. During the Naval Academy's 160th traditional graduation ceremony, 1,028 midshipmen, including 219 women, earned their commissions. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
CAMP SPRINGS, MD - MAY 13: (AFP OUT) The Presidential Limousine with U.S. President Barack Obama drives past the Blue Angels Navy demonstration squadron on May 13, 2010 at Andrews Air Force Base near Camp Springs, Maryland. Obama is on an economic tour and will address the small-business agenda in Western New York before going to New York City for a Democratic fund raiser. (Photo by Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 09: A pelican appears to be flying if formation with U.S. Navy Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornets during a practice performance ahead of the Fleet Week air show October 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 10 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 09: U.S. Navy Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornets practice their performance ahead of the Fleet Week air show October 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 10 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 09: U.S. Navy Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornets practice their performance ahead of the Fleet Week air show October 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 10 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 09: Vapor comes off the wings of a U.S. Navy Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornet during a practice performance ahead of the Fleet Week air show October 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 10 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 08: A U.S. Navy Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornet piloted by U.S. Marine Corps Major Nathan Miller flies over the San Francisco Bay during a practice flight ahead of the Fleet Week performance October 8, 2009 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 10 with a parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 10: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels pilots practice a Fleet Week performance October 10, 2008 in San Francisco. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 11 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 10: A spectator watches pilots with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels practice a Fleet Week performance October 10, 2008 in San Francisco. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 11 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 10: F/A-18 Hornets of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels fly past people on a bay cruise as they practice their Fleet Week performance October 10, 2008 in San Francisco, California. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 11 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 10: F/A-18 Hornets of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels practice their Fleet Week performance October 10, 2008 in San Francisco. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 11 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - OCTOBER 10: F/A-18 Hornets of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels practice their Fleet Week performance October 10, 2008 in San Francisco. San Francisco kicks off its annual Fleet Week celebration October 11 with the parade of ships and an air show featuring the Blue Angels. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
ANNAPOLIS, MD - MAY 23: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels aerobatic team flies over the United States Naval Academy Graduation and Commissioning Ceremony at the Navy-Marine Corps Stadium May 23, 2008 in Annapolis, Maryland. Founded in 1845, the academy will graduate 1037 1st Class Midshipmen, more than a thousand of which will go on to commissions in the armed forces. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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Blue Angels do not wear g-suits, which are designed to keep someone from passing out by pushing the blood toward the head using inflatable bladders in the legs. The team's tight formations, sometimes just inches apart, require careful control of the flight stick and the suit bladders could interfere with that. The photographers also fly without g-suits and must learn breathing techniques and stay physically fit to avoid passing out.

"It is like trying to take photographs while riding a roller coaster — a roller coaster on steroids," said Katy Holm of Naples, Florida, another team photographer.

The Thunderbirds, the U.S. Air Force's aerial demonstration team, have a similar program for Air Force photographers to fly with the team. Based at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, the team flies six F-16Cs and two F-16Ds. The location of the flight stick does allow Thunderbird pilots and photographers to wear g-suits.

Navy photographer Andrea Perez of Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, has passed out and thrown up while riding in the back of the Blue Angels' jets.

"It helps to be focused on the lens and not worried about what is going on outside — whether the ground is above your head or whether you are spinning in circles," she said.

After a ride in the jet, Perez said she feels drained. But the exertion is worth it when she reviews her photographs of the team flying wingtip to wingtip in tight formations.

"You have a viewpoint that no other photographer is going to have," she said. "It's pretty amazing."

Related: Meet Capt. Katie Higgins of the Blue Angels:

Alpha Geek: Capt. Katie Higgins of The Blue Angels

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