Kansas white supremacist sentenced to death for three murders

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Frazier Glenn Cross Sentenced to Death

A judge on Tuesday issued the death penalty for the white supremacist convicted of shooting to death three people at two Jewish centers in Kansas last year.

Johnson County District Court Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan sentenced Frazier Glenn Cross, 74, to die by lethal injection.

A jury in early September convicted Cross, a former senior member of the Ku Klux Klan, of the murders and recommended that he be put to death. Cross also was convicted of three counts of attempted murder for shooting at three other people.

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The jury found Cross guilty of killing Reat Underwood, 14, and his grandfather, William Corporon, 69, outside the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City, and Terri LaManno, 53, outside a Jewish retirement home, both in Overland Park, Kansas.

After the judge announced his decision, Cross gave the "Heil Hitler" salute and was forcibly removed from the courtroom.

On the way out, Cross said, "One day my spirit will rise from the grave and you'll know I was right. I'm a happy man."

Cross said in court on Tuesday, as he did during the trial, that he wanted to kill Jews because he believes they control the media, financial institutions and the government.

"Jews are destroying the white race," he said, calling himself a patriot. None of those he killed were Jewish.

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Kansas white supremacist sentenced to death for three murders
Frazier Glenn Cross, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, looks around after being wheeled into a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session on Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Olathe, Kan. Cross, 73, an avowed white supremacist, is accused of fatally shooting 69-year-old William Corporon and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, on April 13 in Overland Park, Kan., and 53-year-old Terri LaManno at a nearby Jewish retirement complex. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, John Sleezer, Pool)
Frazier Glenn Cross, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, is wheeled into a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session on Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Olathe, Kan. Cross, 73, an avowed white supremacist, is accused of fatally shooting 69-year-old William Corporon and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, on April 13 in Overland Park, Kan., and 53-year-old Terri LaManno at a nearby Jewish retirement complex. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, John Sleezer, Pool)
Frazier Glenn Cross, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, visits with his defense team after being wheeled into a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session on Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Olathe, Kan. Cross, 73, an avowed white supremacist, is accused of fatally shooting 69-year-old William Corporon and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, on April 13 in Overland Park, Kan., and 53-year-old Terri LaManno at a nearby Jewish retirement complex. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, John Sleezer, Pool)
Frazier Glenn Cross, who is also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, visits with his defense team after being wheeled into a Johnson County courtroom for a scheduling session on Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Olathe, Kan. Cross, 73, an avowed white supremacist, is accused of fatally shooting 69-year-old William Corporon and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Underwood, on April 13 in Overland Park, Kan., and 53-year-old Terri LaManno at a nearby Jewish retirement complex. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, John Sleezer, Pool)
Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, appears at his arraignment in New Century, Kan., Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Cross is being charged for shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City on April 13. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, David Eulitt, Pool)
Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, appears at his arraignment in New Century, Kan., Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Cross is being charged for shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City on April 13. At right is Michelle Durrett, attorney with the public defender's office. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, David Eulitt, Pool)
In this Sunday, April 13, 2014 image from video provided by KCTV-5, Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, is escorted by police in an elementary school parking lot in Overland Park, Kan. Cross, 73, accused of killing three people in attacks at a Jewish community center and Jewish retirement complex near Kansas City, is a known white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader who was once the subject of a nationwide manhunt. (AP Photo/KCTV-5) MANDATORY CREDIT
This photo provided by 41ActionNews, shows Frazier Glenn Cross. Cross is accused of killing three people outside of Jewish sites near Kansas City, Sunday April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/41ActionNews) (AP Photo/41 Action News)
Investigators work behind a police line near the location of a shooting at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A Kansas State Trooper controls traffic at the entrance of the Jewish Community Center after reports of a shooting in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
Kansas State Troopers stand outside a police line near the location of a shooting at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
An Overland Park police officer and Kansas State Trooper guard the entrance of the Jewish Community Center after reports of a shooting in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A Kansas State Trooper stands near the location of a shooting at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
Map locates Kansas City where a gunman kills at least 3 people.; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;
The scene outside the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., following a shooting on Sunday, April 13, 2014. (John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
People, including many students from Blue Valley High School, gathered to mourn the victims of the shooting at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom during a vigil at St. Thomas The Apostle Episcopal Church in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. One of the victims, Reat Underwood, was a student at Blue Valley High School in Overland Park. (Tammy Ljungblad/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Overland Park Mayor Carl Gerlach briefs the media on the shootings that occurred Sunday, April 13, 2014, at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom. A suspect in the shootings is in custody. (Tammy Ljungblad/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Police and crime scene investigators were on the scene of a shooting at the Jewish Community Center campus in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. A pickup truck was of interest to crime scene investigators after the shooting. Two males were killed just outside the White Theatre on the campus. Police announced a suspect is in custody. (Tammy Ljungblad/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Police appear on the scene of a shooting at the Jewish Community Center campus in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. Two males were killed just outside the White Theatre on the campus. Police announced a suspect is in custody. (Tammy Ljungblad/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Marshall McCarl, 16, mourned the loss of Reat Underwood, a classmate at Blue Valley High School who was shot and killed Sunday outside of the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, Kan., Sunday, April 13, 2014. People gathered to mourn the victims of the shooting at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom during a vigil Sunday night at St. Thomas The Apostle Episcopal Church in Overland Park. (Tammy Ljungblad/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
The scene outside the Jewish Community Center in Leawood, Kan., following a shooting on Sunday, April 13, 2014. (John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
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In court statements before the sentencing, several relatives of victims denounced Cross for his views and spoke of their painful losses. Cross, a military veteran, sat at a court table in a wheel chair, sometimes glancing up at those who spoke at the podium.

Will Corporon, son of William Corporon, glared at Cross as he talked.

"You are a coward," he said. "You are not a patriot. You are a disgrace to the uniform you wore."

Cross, representing himself in court, said on Tuesday he should be released because he was justified in trying to kill Jews.

"I wanted to kill Jews, not Christians and I do regret it," Cross said. During the trial he faulted the victims for associating with Jews by going to Jewish centers.

Melinda Corporon, wife of William Corporon, told Cross he has never known love.

"We are here today to make sure this voice of evil is silenced permanently," she said.

Kansas restored the death penalty in 1994; no one has been executed in the state since 1965.

(Reporting by Kevin Murphy in Kansas City; Editing by Mary Wisniewski, Alan Crosby and Leslie Adler)

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