The 12 best news and reading apps in the world

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Whether you're at home or on the go, it's always handy to have something to read.

Smartphones are fast becoming our go-to way to consume all types of media, but sometimes its hard to know which apps are worth our time.

From e-books to Reddit to breaking news, these are the best apps to help you stay on top of the stories everybody is talking about.

Pocket will help you save articles to read later.

pocket news app

Pocket

Pocket lets you save anything you come across on your smartphone or desktop computer to come back to later. And lots of apps integrate directly with Pocket to let you save articles and videos.

The app itself can download stories in a clean, easily readable interface for offline reading, and the service learns what you like and recommends more articles you might find interesting.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

NYT Now is great for digesting the news.

new york times news app

iTunes

The New York Times exemplifies how to make a great news app with NYT Now. The app is run by a dedicated team at the Times and updated throughout the day with breaking news, features, stories from other publications, and easily digestible breakdowns of the day's news highlights.

Even better, you can use it for free, even if you don't subscribe to The New York Times.

Price: Free (iOS)

Nuzzel shows you what your friends are reading.

nuzzel news app

iTunes

Nuzzel knows the stories your friends are talking about on Twitter and suggests them for you to read. Not only are you seeing the most talked about articles from around the web in your feed, but you also see them with comments from accounts that you follow.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

Never miss another of Reddit's famous AMA interviews with the Ask Me Anything app.

iTunes

Everyone from Woody Harrelson, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and President Obama have participated in Reddit's popular AMA interviews, where commenters can submit questions for the chance for a direct answer. Since Reddit can appear cluttered and confusing for new users, Ask Me Anything organizes the interviews in an easy-to-peruse format, even alerting you to new AMAs and allowing you to explore past ones, too.

Price: Free (iOS,Android)

Snapchat makes you feel like you're part of a news event.

snapchat app

Snapchat

Snapchat has made major moves into the news business with both live stories and its "discover" feature. Discover gives you Snapchat channels for media outlets like BuzzFeed, Vice, and CNN. If you want a more on-the-ground feel, "live stories" can show you curated collections of amateur video shot around big events near you and in the world at large.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

Flipboard is a beautiful magazine of stories you want to read.

flipboard news app

Flipboard

Flipboard has been in the App Store for a long time, but even with the introduction of the Apple News app in iOS 9, it's managed to stay relevant.

Like Apple News, Flipboard pulls in stories from online publications and displays them in a mobile-optimized interface. Where Flipboard stands out is its ability to let you see what other users are reading through the app. You can also make your own "magazine" of content you like and share it with others on Flipboard or through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

Amazon Kindle is great for reading e-books.

amazon kindle ebooks

iTunes/Kindle

With access to over 3,000,000 books and audiobooks, the Kindle app is a no-brainer for reading.

It works on and syncs across Android, iOS, the desktop, and, of course, your Kindle, so your reading progress is up to date wherever you go.

The formatting options, built-in dictionary, and search capabilities are great, but the real killer feature is Amazon's Whispersync For Voice technology, which lets you go back and forth between reading text and listening to an audiobook. For now, the feature is available on 60,000 titles.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

Alien Blue is the best app out there for browsing Reddit on the go.

alien blue browsing reddit

App Annie

Reddit, the so-called "front page of the internet," is an ever-changing ecosystem of interesting articles, pictures, and discussions, but it's notoriously messy to browse on your smartphone. Alien Blue fixes that, wrapping Reddit's content into an eye-catching design that brings to focus the essentials information like photos, post titles, and comments.

Price: Free (iOS)

Wattpad is a reading community with access to millions of free e-books.

wattpad ebooks

Wattpad

Over 40 million people use Wattpad to read millions of free e-books, from classics like "Moby Dick" to "Twilight" fanfiction. Wattpad is also a social network built around reading. You can leave comments on passages and see comments from others. Authors on the app can talk directly with fans and share their works.

Cost: Free (iOS, Android)

Tweetbot is a great alternative to Twitter.

Tweetbot

Tweetbot is a fantastic way to customize your Twitter experience, and makes it easy to stay on top of all incoming activity. It also lets you monitor the stats on your individual tweets and your account in general, and cuts out all the ads you would have seen in your timeline.

Price: $4.99 (iOS)

AP Mobile gets you the breaking news fast.

ap mobile news

AP

The Associated Press claims to be "where the News gets its news," and there's no better place to stay up to date on the latest breaking local and national news. You can customize what kind of stories are in your feed, and the app constantly refreshes so you don't miss any new developments.

Price: Free (Android, iOS)

BuzzFeed's app pulls all the best news from around the internet.

buzzfeed news app

Lara O'Reilly/Business Insider

The BuzzFeed News app is all about ease. It curates the breaking news around the web, pulling in articles from BuzzFeed as well as other publications, in addition to newsworthy tweets or longform journalism. You can also teach the app to be even better with customizable notifications, or share the content with your friends.

Price: Free (iOS, Android)

Related: See the evolution of the iPhone through the years:

20 PHOTOS
Evolution of the iPhone
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The 12 best news and reading apps in the world
Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up an Apple iPhone at the MacWorld Conference in San Francisco, Jan. 9, 2007. Apple Inc., on a tear with its popular iPod players and Macintosh computers, is expected to report strong quarterly results Wednesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
Jeff Gamet, from the Internet magazine The Mac Observer, looks at the new Apple iPhone at MacWorld Conference and Expo in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2007. Apple Inc. is a tight ship when it comes to corporate secrets, regularly suing journalists and employees who leak data about upcoming products. Although few people outside of Apple's headquarters knew product specifications for the iPhone before its announcement, the device was widely anticipated. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
An advertisement for the upcoming iPhone is displayed in the Apple store in SoHo, Friday, June 22, 2007 in New York. The long anticipated gadget hits the market on June 29th. (AP Photo/Dima Gavrysh)
A television journalist holds the Apple iPhone, the only one given to a journalist in Los Angeles before it went on sale, as he interviews people waiting to buy the iPhone outside the Apple store at The Grove in Los Angeles, Friday, June 29, 2007. After six months of hype, thousands of people Friday will get their hands on the iPhone, the new cell phone that Apple Inc. is banking on to become its third core business next to its moneymaking iPod players and Macintosh computers. Customers were camped out at Apple and AT&T stores across the nation. The gadget, which combines the functions of a cell phone, iPod media player and wireless Web browser, will go on sale in the United States at 6 p.m. in each time zone. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
A customer holds a demonstration Apple iPhone during the release of the Apple product and the opening of a new Apple Store at Woodland Hills Mall in Tulsa, Okla., on Friday, June 29, 2007. More than 500 people waited in line. (AP Photo/David Crenshaw)
Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs announces the new Apple iPhone 3G during the keynote speech at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, Monday, June 9, 2008. Jobs announced innovations to the Mac OS X Leopard operating system and an enhanced iPhone. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
An older Apple iPhone is shown next to an advertisement for the new iPhone 3G at an AT&T store in Palo Alto, Calif., Tuesday, July 8, 2008. To sustain the momentum of the original iPhone's success and keep fickle consumers and Wall Street happy, Apple Inc. needs a dramatic second act with the next generation of iPhones, which roll out Friday with faster Internet access and lower retail prices. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
A shop worker holds the new Apple iPhone 3GS in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, June 19, 2009. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
Apple CEO Steve Jobs smiles as he uses the new iPhone 4 at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, Monday, June 7, 2010, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
Apple iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, Monday, June 7, 2010 in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2011 file photo, Chris Cioban, manager of the Verizon store in Beachwood, Ohio, holds up an Apple iPhone 4G. Verizon Wireless, the nation's largest cellphone company, announced Tuesday, June 12, 2012, that is dropping nearly all of its phone plans in favor of pricing schemes that encourage consumers to connect their non-phone devices, like tablets and PCs, to Verizon's network. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)
Apple CEO Tim Cook during an introduction of the new iPhone 5 in San Francisco, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
People queue outside the Apple Store as the iPhone 5 mobile phones went on sale in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Friday Sept. 28, 2012. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, new plastic iPhones 5C are displayed during a media event held in Beijing, China. Last year, eager buyers in Beijing waited overnight in freezing weather to buy the iPhone 4S. Pressure to get it — and the profit to be made by reselling scarce phones — prompted some to pelt the store with eggs when Apple, worried about the size of the crowd, postponed opening. Just 18 months later, many Chinese gadget lovers responded with a shrug this week when Apple Inc. unveiled two new versions of the iPhone 5. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
A customer examines a new iPhone 5s at the Nebraska Furniture Mart in Omaha, Neb., on Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, the day the new iPhone 5c and 5s models go on sale. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the new Apple Watch and iPhone 6 on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Two new iPhone 6 are photographed at the Apple store in the city centre of Munich, Germany, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. A large crowd had gathered in front of the Apple store ahead of the offical launch of Apple's new iPhone. (AP Photo, dpa,Peter Kneffel)
FILE - In this Sept. 19, 2014 file photo, a customer looks at the screen size on the new iPhone 6 Plus while waiting in line to upgrade his iPhone at a Verizon Wireless store in Flowood, Miss. A newly-discovered glitch in Apple's software can cause iPhones to mysteriously shut down when they receive a certain text message. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the new iPhone 6s and 6s Plus during an Apple media event in San Francisco, California on September 9, 2015. Apple unveiled its iPad Pro, saying the large-screen tablet has the power and capabilities to replace a laptop computer. AFP PHOTO/JOSH EDELSON (Photo credit should read Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)
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