Largest police union cautions Quentin Tarantino: We've got a surprise coming for you

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In a veiled threat, the largest police union in the country says it has a "surprise" in store for Quentin Tarantino.

Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, would not go into any detail about what is being cooked up for the Hollywood director, but he did tell THR: "We'll be opportunistic."

"Tarantino has made a good living out of violence and surprise," Pasco says. "Our offices make a living trying to stop violence, but surprise is not out of the question."

See Tarantino attending the police protest:

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Largest police union cautions Quentin Tarantino: We've got a surprise coming for you
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino attends a protest to denounce police brutality in Manhattan October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (L) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (C) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino holds a banner as attends a rally to denounce police brutality in Washington Square Park October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino holds a banner as attends a rally to denounce police brutality in Washington Square Park October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
Director Quentin Tarantino, center, participates in a rally to protest against police brutality Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015, in New York. Speakers at the protest said they want to bring justice for those who were killed by police. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
Kimberly Griffin, left, holds hands with film director Quentin Tarantino after she recalled memories of her son Kimoni Davis, during a public reading of the names of people who have died at the hands of police nationwide, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, at Times Square, in New York. The protest marked the start of three days of protests and marches speaking out against violence at the hands of law enforcement. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
US film director Quentin Tarantino takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (L) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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The FOP, based in Washington, D.C., consists of more than 330,000 full-time, sworn officers. According to Pasco, the surprise in question is already "in the works," and will be in addition to the standing boycott of Tarantino's films, including his upcoming movie The Hateful Eight.

"Something is in the works, but the element of surprise is the most important element," Pasco says. "Something could happen anytime between now and [the premiere]. And a lot of it is going to be driven by Tarantino, who is nothing if not predictable.

"The right time and place will come up and we'll try to hurt him in the only way that seems to matter to him, and that's economically," Pasco says.

When asked if this was a threat, Pasco said no, at least not a physical threat. "Police officers protect people," he says. "They don't go out to hurt people."

The director of the upcoming Hateful Eight has drawn the ire of unions from the largest police departments in the country, border patrol and other law enforcement organizations.

WATCH: Viggo Mortensen: Tarantino boycott a 'smokescreen' to hide the real issues:

Viggo Mortensen: Tarantino Boycott A 'Smokescreen' To Hide The Real Issues

READ MORE: Quentin Tarantino Defends Cop Comments on MSNBC: I Thought "I Had First Amendment Rights"

Last month while marching in New York for a rally against police brutality, Tarantino called police "murderers." He has since gone public to clarify his remarks, saying that he is not anti-police, but against unarmed men and women being killed by them.

At this point, most box-office analysts don't think Hateful Eight will be hurt at the box office by the dust-up.

READ MORE: New York Police Union Responds to Quentin Tarantino's 'Latest Outburst'

"Tarantino is no stranger to controversy. At the end of the day, this publicity only has people talking about the film more. I don't think it will negatively impact the box office," says Phil Contrino of BoxOffice.com. Adds Jeff Bock of Exhibitor Relations, "I think audiences can separate the auteur from the activist since most people who buy a ticket to a Quentin Tarantino film show up to hear what his characters say, not the filmmaker. "I mean Star Wars is about to take over the known media universe. This is just white noise."

Rentrak's Paul Dergarabedian has a different opinion. "Quite simply, there's no way to know whether it will affect box office. Even after it opens, you can't quantify whether or not a boycott ultimately had an impact. But it has to cause a headache. It's not the kind of thing you want surrounding your movie, especially in the crowded Christmas frame when it will be going up against movies like Joy. And this situation is gaining traction. The idea that there's no such thing as bad press isn't necessarily true here."

TWC didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on the FOP.

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