This very confused 'cow' dreams of being a dog

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Meet the Adorable Cow That Really Wants To Be a Dog

A little calf named Goliath has given up his bovine nature for a more pet-like behavior. He wants to be a dog. Twitter user shaysaprocky (Shaylee Hubbs, in real life) uploaded a photo on her account showing her calf chilling on her living room couch. To add to the animal's confusion, while Goliath is technically a baby bull, his owner refers to him as a cow. After posting the photo, her tweet got incredible traction on the platform and currently has more than 31,000 retweets, making Goliath the next Internet sensation.



Some of the other users who saw the photo, pointed out the mixup since cows are, by definition, female animals. Goliath's owner cleared the controversy with the following tweet:



According to Mashable, Hubbs rescued the calf when he was born extremely thin and sick and took him in her house. Goliath also loves eating dog food and being scratched, as his owner showed with additional tweets:





RELATED: See how cows are connected to politics in India:
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This very confused 'cow' dreams of being a dog
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, a worker feeds cows at a 'Gaushala' or shelter for cattle, in New Delhi, India. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, a woman leads her cow across a road collecting alms from devout Hindus in Mumbai, India. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 photo, activists of Jammu Kashmir National Panther Party shout slogans during a shutdown called against cow slaughter and against an independent state lawmaker for hosting a party where he served beef, in Jammu, India. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, Hindu devotees feed a cow after performing Pind Daan rituals, believed to bring peace to the souls of ancestors, on the banks of the River Ganges, in Allahabad, India. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, Ritika Arora feeds calves, a ritual she follows regularly at a 'Gaushala' or shelter for cattle, in New Delhi, India. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, supporters of Engineer Rashid Ahmed, a Jammu and Kashmir state lawmaker, shout slogans during a protest against India's ruling Hindu nationalist party Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) after lawmakers from the BJP kicked and punched Ahmed on Thursday for hosting a party where he served beef, in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Hindus consider cows to be sacred, and slaughtering the animals is banned in most Indian states. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015 photo, Indian policemen detain a supporter of Engineer Rashid Ahmed, a Jammu and Kashmir state lawmaker, during a protest against India's ruling Hindu nationalist party Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) after lawmakers from the BJP kicked and punched Ahmed on Thursday for hosting a party where he served beef, in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Hindus consider cows to be sacred, and slaughtering the animals is banned in most Indian states. Cows have long been sacred to Hindus, worshipped as a mother figure and associated since ancient times with the god Krishna. But increasingly, cows are also becoming a tool of political parties, an electioneering code word and a rallying cry for both Hindu nationalists and their opponents. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Protestors shout slogans during a shutdown in Jammu, India, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015. Life in Jammu was affected Saturday by a protest shutdown called against cow slaughter and against an independent state lawmaker for hosting a party where he served beef. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Indians rest in front of closed shops during a shutdown in Jammu, India, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015. Life in Jammu was affected Saturday by a protest shutdown called against cow slaughter and against an independent state lawmaker for hosting a party where he served beef. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Engineer Rashid Ahmed, an independent member of the Jammu and Kashmir state assembly, sits as he blocks the traffic on the road with his supporters during a protest in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. Police in Indian portion of Kashmir detained dozens of supporters of Ahmed during a protest against India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party or BJP after their Lawmakers kicked and punched Ahmed for hosting a party where he served beef on Thursday. Hindus consider cows to be sacred, and slaughtering the animals is banned in most Indian states. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Indian security personnel patrol near a tire burnt by protestors during a shut down in Jammu, India, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015. Life in Jammu was affected Saturday by a protest shutdown called against cow slaughter and against an independent state lawmaker for hosting a party where he served beef. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
A young girl carries cow dung to be used as fuel, at a 'Gaushala' or shelter for cattle in New Delhi, India, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. While cows are revered by Hindus and many call them 'gau mata' or cow mother, recently a Muslim man was lynched and his son severely injured upon hearing rumors that the family was eating beef, a taboo for many among Indiaâs majority Hindu population. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
A worker helps a woman carry cow dung to be used as fuel, at a 'Gaushala' or shelter for cattle in New Delhi, India, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. While cows are revered by Hindus and many call them 'gau mata' or cow mother, recently Hindu nationalists lynched a Muslim man to death and severely injured his son upon hearing rumors that the family was eating beef, a taboo for many among Indiaâs majority Hindu population. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
A worker cleans a 'Gaushala' or shelter for cattle in New Delhi, India, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. While cows are revered by Hindus and many call them 'gau mata' or cow mother, recently Hindu nationalists lynched a Muslim man to death and severely injured his son upon hearing rumors that the family was eating beef, a taboo for many among Indiaâs majority Hindu population. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
Indian policemen detain Engineer Rashid Ahmed, an independent member of the Jammu and Kashmir state assembly during a protest in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. Police in Indian portion of Kashmir detained dozens of supporters of Ahmed during a protest against India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party or BJP after their Lawmakers kicked and punched Ahmed for hosting a party where he served beef on Thursday. Hindus consider cows to be sacred, and slaughtering the animals is banned in most Indian states. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
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