Guinness stout will soon be vegan-friendly

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Guinness Stout Will Soon Be Vegan-Friendly

Guinness has been brewing their beloved stout for over two centuries, and they've been using fish bladders to do so.

While that certainly hasn't adversely affected the taste, the inclusion has prevented vegans and vegetarians from enjoying a pint.

Soon, that will change.

Guinness Brewing announced this week they will be removing the animal byproduct from the beverage making process.

The swim bladders, which when in use by the fish help them stay afloat, are traditionally dried and turned into a gelatin.

Called isinglass, the final product is used during the filtration process to extract excess yeast.

Though the substance is not an actual ingredient and is ultimately filtered out itself, trace amounts may remain, rendering the drink unsuitable for those who have sworn off animal-based goods.

A spokesperson said they "...have been looking for an alternative solution for some time. We are now pleased to have identified a new process through investment in a state-of-the-art filtration system at St. James's Gate which, once in place, will remove the use of isinglass in the brewing process."

That isinglass-free system will be built sometime next year.

See where Guinness is made:
12 PHOTOS
Guinness Brewery, Dublin
See Gallery
Guinness stout will soon be vegan-friendly
Freshly poured Guinness settles in branded pint glasses on the bar in the Guinness Gravity Bar at the St. James's Gate Brewery, in Dublin, Ireland, on Saturday, March 16, 2013. Irelandâs renewed competiveness makes it a beacon for the U.S. companies such as EBay, Google Inc. and Facebook Inc., which have expanded their operations in the country over the past two years. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Visitors look out over the Dublin city skyline from the viewing gallery in the Guinness Gravity Bar at the company's St. James's Gate Brewery, in Dublin, Ireland, on Saturday, March 16, 2013. Irelandâs renewed competiveness makes it a beacon for the U.S. companies such as EBay, Google Inc. and Facebook Inc., which have expanded their operations in the country over the past two years. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A pedestrian passes the entrance to the Guinness brewery, operated by Diageo Plc, in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011. John Bruton, a former Irish Prime Minister, said the country's largest opposition party, Fine Gael, may be able to form the next government alone after elections next week. Photographer: Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A pedestrian passes the entrance to the Guinness brewery, operated by Diageo Plc, in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011. John Bruton, a former Irish Prime Minister, said the country's largest opposition party, Fine Gael, may be able to form the next government alone after elections next week. Photographer: Aidan Crawley/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Valentine Bolger, once employeed by Guiness to deliver beer by horse and cart is pictured outside the Guinness brewery in Dublin, September 24, 2009, ahead of 'Arthurs Day.' Millions of revellers are due to raise pints of the world's most famous stout to toast the birth of Guinness. A raft of global celebrations will mark Arthur's Day and 250 years since the Irish brewer went into business. Dublin's St James's Gate will host the hub of festivities to commemorate founder Arthur Guinness and patrons will raise their glasses at 17.59 to celebrate the historical signing of its lease in 1759. AFP PHOTO/Peter Muhly (Photo credit should read PETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images)
DUBLIN, IRELAND - APRIL 16: A harp logo is displayed on the gates of the Guinness brewery on April 16, 2006 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
DUBLIN, IRELAND - APRIL 16: Visitors take a photograph at the Guinness brewery on April 16, 2006 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
DUBLIN, IRELAND - APRIL 16: Television images of pints of Guinness are reflected on a display at the Guinness brewery on April 16, 2006 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
DUBLIN, IRELAND - APRIL 16: Rubber Guinness toys are displayed at the Guinness brewery on April 16, 2006 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
DUBLIN, IRELAND - APRIL 16: Visitors take walk past the Guinness brewery on April 16, 2006 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
FILE - A man and his dray horse stop to adjust their load outside the gates of the Guinness Brewing Company in Dublin, Ireland in this Sept. 14, 2000 file photo. Guinness says it's building a new brewery home in Dublin, but two others in Ireland will close. Guinness parent Diageo unveiled a scaled-down plan Wednesday Jan 11 2012 to concentrate its Irish beer-making operations in one new euro 153 million ($195 million) brewery at its St. James' Gate base in Dublin, Ireland's top tourist attraction.(AP Photo/John Cogill, file)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION
Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

People are Reading

Search Recipes