Christian groups are furious that Chick-fil-A has 'gone gay'

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Chick-Fil-A Franchise Donates to LGBT Film Festival

Oh, the dilemma that is being Chick-fil-A: The chain can lose potential customers by opposing same-sex marriage, or it can tick off its loyal base by not denouncing one franchisee who thinks the opposite.

After a rogue Nashville Chick-fil-A owner donated to an LGBT film festival, the chain got prominently listed on the event's website, resulting in various angry media outlets misreporting it as corporate sponsorship. Outrage at the chain has oozed forth ever since over this purported corporate shift, despite the fact that past franchisees acting alone have gone even further in support of LGBT causes.

Level Ground, "the world's first faith-based LGBT film festival," bills itself as a safe gathering place for the LGBT community to meet with Evangelicals and "dialogue about faith, gender, and sexuality through the arts," but that's a step too far for at least 718 concerned citizens (so far) who've signed a Change.org petition called "CFA Goes Gay, Corporate Needs to Know!" Its creator, Steven Policastro, asks Chick-fil-A to clarify its corporate stance on same-sex marriage, because this slope is starting to look very slippery:

And upon further inquiry, your sponsorship of this organization supports pro-gay organizations such as:

The Christian Closet (gay-affirming Christian counseling)
The Center For Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion and Ministry (promoting the gay agenda in Christian ministry)
Therapists 4 Equality (LGBTQ Affirmative Therapy)
The Reformation Project (an attempt to bring the gay agenda into the church's theology)
Believe Outloud (an organization to promote gender equality to Christian clergy)

Corporate has seemingly done all of the clarifying it wants, saying it doesn't "make decisions on local sponsorships," and nothing more. That's going to make for some bitter chicken sandwiches for these protesters -- and there's now the possibility of Evangelicals boycotting Chick-fil-A right next to same-sex couples and PETA.

[Change.org via Slate]

RELATED: See photos of the opening of Chick-fil-A's biggest restaurant in Manhattan last month:

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Chick-fil-a October Manhattan restaurant opening
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Christian groups are furious that Chick-fil-A has 'gone gay'
Pedestrians walk past a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Chicken nuggets, french fries, and a fried chicken sandwich are arranged for a photograph during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employees gives chicken sandwich samples to guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A employee picks up a fried chicken sandwich during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee prepares chicken nuggets for guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee prepares food for guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees prepare fried chicken sandwiches for guests during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees wash vegetables during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attendees take a selfie photograph with the Chick-fil-A mascot during an event ahead of the grand opening for the restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
French fries and a fried chicken sandwich are arranged for a photograph during an event ahead of the grand opening for a Chick-fil-A restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Chick-fil-A mascot rides an elevator during an event ahead of the grand opening for the restaurant in New York, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Chick-fil-A, the Southern chicken-sandwich chain that has drawn both controversy and copycats over the years, has finally arrived in New York. The company will open a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter), three-level restaurant in Manhattan's Garment District that will be the chain's largest location in the nation. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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