Mexican families hoping for medicinal marijuana watch court

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

11 PHOTOS
NTP: Mexican families wait for Medical Marijuana decision
See Gallery
Mexican families hoping for medicinal marijuana watch court
Graciela Elizalde, an 8-year-old who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, receives hydrotherapy treatment at a swimming complex in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Elizalde's parents have already seen a difference in their daughter since she began taking a marijuana extract recently. A federal judge gave them permission to import the marijuana oil. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Mayela Benavides, reflected in the window, holds a her daughter Valentina as she watches her other daughter Graciela Elizalde receive hydrotherapy at a swimming complex in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Graciela, 8, who has Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Mayela Benavides carries a her daughter Graciela who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, after a hydrotherapy treatment at a swimming complex in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. The 8-year-old recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. A federal judge gave them permission to import the marijuana oil. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Graciela Elizalde, left, who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, receive therapy in her school for special needs children in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. The 8-year-old recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. âWe know there are about 40 families right now that have been organizing around Graceâs parents,â said Dr. Carlos Aguirre Velazquez, chief of pediatric neurology at Monterreyâs Childrenâs Hospital. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Graciela Elizalde, who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, rests after therapy at school in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. The 8-year-old recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. The Elizaldes are not part of the case on recreational use that Mexicoâs Supreme Court this week put off hearing until at least next week, but they hope it could make things easier for them and other families. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Graciela Elizalde, an 8-year-old who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, is carried by her therapist before receiving hydrotherapy treatment at a swimming complex in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Elizalde recently began taking a marijuana extract to ease her suffering. âWeâre very happy because what weâre seeing is that Grace is sleeping continuously through the nights, something she had not done in months,â said her father, Raul Elizalde. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Toys sit in the bedroom of Graciela Elizalde in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Graciela, 8, who has Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. Mexico has decriminalized the possession of some drugs, including marijuana, for personal use since 2009. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Mayela Benavides helps walks your daughter Graciela walk inside her home in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. The 8-year-old has Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, and recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. âThe debate before the Supreme Court right not is about recreational cannabis,â said Graciela's father Raul Elizalde. âWhat weâre looking for is medicinal cannabis, but if it (the court) opens the door for recreational cannabis it would be welcome because by default it would benefit us, too.â (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Photographs of Graciela Elizalde, an 8-year-old who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, are on display at her home in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Graciela recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. âThe first person who changed his way of thinking was me,â said her father Raul Elizalde. âI was someone who thought that cannabis did not serve for anything, that it couldnât be a good thing for someone.â (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Graciela Elizalde, who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, waits for her mother after school in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. The 8-year-old recently began taking a marijuana extract which has allowed her to sleep continuously through the night, according to her parents. A federal judge gave them permission to import the marijuana oil. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
A baby photograph of the Graciela Elizalde, who suffers from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures, stands in her bedroom alongside a religious image in Monterrey, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. Elizalde, now 8-years-old, recently began taking a marijuana extract to ease her suffering. Her father, Raul Elizalde, said the family arrived at the decision to try marijuana for their daughter only after exhausting every other option. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

MONTERREY, Mexico (AP) — As Mexico's top court prepares to consider arguments that could open the door to the recreational use of marijuana, some families are hoping such a step could help make medicinal marijuana more accessible.

The parents of 8-year-old Graciela Elizalde of Monterrey have already seen a difference in their daughter since she began taking a marijuana extract recently. A federal judge gave them permission to import the marijuana oil.

"We're very happy because what we're seeing is that Grace is sleeping continuously through the nights, something she had not done in months," said her father, Raul Elizalde, using the child's nickname. Graciela suffers from a severe form of epilepsy that causes intense seizures.

The Elizaldes are not part of the case on recreational use that Mexico's Supreme Court this week put off hearing until at least next week, but they hope it could make things easier for them and other families.

"The debate before the Supreme Court right not is about recreational cannabis," Raul Elizalde said. "What we're looking for is medicinal cannabis, but if it (the court) opens the door for recreational cannabis it would be welcome because by default it would benefit us, too."

Mexico has decriminalized the possession of some drugs, including marijuana, for personal use since 2009.

Elizalde said the family arrived at the decision to try marijuana for their daughter only after exhausting every other option.

"The first person who changed his way of thinking was me," he said. "I was someone who thought that cannabis did not serve for anything, that it couldn't be a good thing for someone."

Reynold Guadalupe Nava, a 4-year-old who also lives in Monterrey, is another child whose mother thinks he could benefit from medicinal marijuana.

Mirna Alvarado said Graciela's case had opened the door and she hopes authorities will begin looking favorably on others as well. She said through talking to other families with children suffering from similar conditions they heard that cannabis oil could help Reynold.

"We know there are about 40 families right now that have been organizing around Grace's parents," said Dr. Carlos Aguirre Velazquez, chief of pediatric neurology at Monterrey's Children's Hospital.

"We don't know what the final result will be, but I believe it's time to set aside a bit the debates and take clear positions," he said. "To say, we, from a health perspective, are in favor of a therapeutic resource used scientifically for the health of any neurological case that requires it."


What Has Colorado Found After Legalizing Pot?

More from AOL.com:
Manhunt for rapist fugitive ends in dramatic shootout
Trooper's selfless act of kindness caught on camera
China threatens war with US over minor incident
Read Full Story

People are Reading