Bill O'Reilly says Quentin Tarantino has 'destroyed his career' speaking against police

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NYPD Union Calls for Film Boycott After Quentin Tarantino Speaks at Protest

Bill O'Reilly says Quentin Tarantino's has "destroyed his career" after the famed Hollywood director spoke at a police protest in New York City over the weekend.

Read: Fiancee of Slain NYPD Officer Breaks Her Silence: 'It Was the Worst Feeling'

The Django Unchained director's comments came less than a week after an NYPD officer was shot and killed.

"I'm a human being with a conscience and if you believe there's murder going on then you need to rise up and stand up against it," the Oscar winner told reporters during a march in Manhattan on Saturday. "I'm here to say I'm on the side of the murdered."

On Monday, O'Reilly said on The O'Reilly Factor: "Last week, New York City police officer Randolph Holder [was] shot dead by a long-time drug dealer that a judge refused to incarcerate. Tyrone Howard, 28 arrests on his sheet ... thus Officer Holder is dead."

He went on: "This Tarantino character, I think he destroyed his career, because anybody hearing that's going to think: 'You know what? Maybe I'm not going to see his movies.'"

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton also spoke about the director during in a radio interview with WNYM-970 AM: "Shame on him. Basically there are no words to describe the contempt I have for him and his comments."

Photos of Quentin Tarantino protesting police in NYC:

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Bill O'Reilly says Quentin Tarantino has 'destroyed his career' speaking against police
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino attends a protest to denounce police brutality in Manhattan October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (L) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (C) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino holds a banner as attends a rally to denounce police brutality in Washington Square Park October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 24: Director Quentin Tarantino holds a banner as attends a rally to denounce police brutality in Washington Square Park October 24, 2015 in New York City. The rally is part of a three-day demonstration against officer-involved abuse and killing. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
Director Quentin Tarantino, center, participates in a rally to protest against police brutality Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015, in New York. Speakers at the protest said they want to bring justice for those who were killed by police. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
Kimberly Griffin, left, holds hands with film director Quentin Tarantino after she recalled memories of her son Kimoni Davis, during a public reading of the names of people who have died at the hands of police nationwide, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, at Times Square, in New York. The protest marked the start of three days of protests and marches speaking out against violence at the hands of law enforcement. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
US film director Quentin Tarantino takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
US film director Quentin Tarantino (L) takes part in a march against police brutality called 'Rise up October' on October 24, 2015, in New York. Campaigners demanding an end to police killings of unarmed suspects demonstrated and marched through Manhattan. AFP PHOTO/EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ (Photo credit should read EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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The police union is also hitting back, labeling the Pulp Fiction director a "degenerate" and calling for a boycott of his upcoming movie, The Hateful Eight, which is set to open Christmas Day.

The fury is erupting just as every cop in the city on Tuesday was mourning the murder of police officer Randolph Holder.

Family and friends gathered for the officer's wake was held in Queens.

Read: NYPD Officer Dies After Being Shot in the Head During Gunfight in East Harlem

Reverend Al Sharpton sparked a hubbub when he said he had been invited to speak at Holder's funeral by the slain officer's family.

But on Tuesday morning, Sharpton wrote to Holder's father to say he had decided not to attend the funeral tomorrow, saying: "I refuse to be part of anything that would marginalize and take away from the focus of this city mourning your son."

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