Patricia to spread flood threat from Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle on Monday

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National Weather Forecast

By KRISTINA PYDYNOWSKI for AccuWeather

While Texas and Louisiana bore the brunt of the major flooding Friday into Sunday as moisture from once-Hurricane Patricia arrived, the flood danger will continue to shift eastward across the Deep South through Monday.

Heavy rain will continue to spread from Mississippi to Alabama and the Florida Panhandle through Monday, accompanied by the threat for flooding.

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In addition to the heavy rain, isolated tornadoes threaten to spin up at the coast. A woman sustained injuries on Sunday outside of New Orleans as a tornado damaged her mobile home.

The greatest concern for widespread and life-threatening flooding will exist from southeast Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle. Rainfall totals will generally be on the order of 3-6 inches with localized higher amounts.

Patricia flooding

Aside from along the coast of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, flooding will be on a more localized level across the rest of the Deep South on Monday. However, it only takes one flooding incident to put lives and property in danger.

Areas that first experience flash flooding will be low water crossings, small streams, secondary roads and urban areas that drain poorly. Flooding will only worsen as the rain intensifies and persists over a given area.

Excessive rainfall will cause streams and small rivers to turn into raging waterways and overflow their banks, inundating neighboring roads and homes. The flood waters could lead to the closure of more major highways and interstates, while also affecting rail travel.

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The flooding could once again become severe enough in some communities to force evacuations and cause some roads and bridges to be washed away.

Check out hurricane incidents by state:

As was seen in Corsicana, Texas, Friday, flood waters could rise faster than officials can close roads with rainfall rates reaching 1-3 inches per hour in the heaviest downpours. Motorists in this situation could become stranded and be put in harm's way.

Never attempt to drive through a flooded roadway. Doing so puts not only you and your occupants at risk for drowning, but also your would-be rescuers.

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The current could be strong enough to sweep your vehicle downstream into deeper water as 1-2 feet of water is enough to cause most vehicles to lose control. The water level may rapidly rise across roadways, which may be compromised below the surface.

Parents are urged to keep their kids away from stream banks and culverts. The bank of a stream can give way, and rapidly rising water can sweep away onlookers.

Even if flooding does not ensue, travel disruptions are likely due to poor visibility and heavy rainfall. Lengthy airline delays are possible. Motorists will need to reduce their speed to lower the risk of hydroplaning.

Patricia and moisture from the Gulf of Mexico are to blame for the heavy rain and flood incidents.

See photos of damage in Mexico caused by Hurricane Patricia:

25 PHOTOS
Hurricane Patricia damage and aftermath
See Gallery
Patricia to spread flood threat from Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle on Monday
View of a street in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, partially destroyed after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
A sofa and refrigerator lie among the debris of homes destroyed by Hurricane Patricia, in Chamela, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Record-breaking Patricia pushed rapidly inland over mountainous western Mexico early Saturday, weakening to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Soldiers help a woman to leave her flooded house to take her to a shelter in Zoatlan, Nayarit state, some 150 km northwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia made landfall Friday on a sparsely populated stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 storm, avoiding direct hits on the resort city of Puerto Vallarta and major port city of Manzanillo as it weakened to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Aerial view of of Manzanillo beach in Colima State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents of the Chamela community return to their homes after the passage of hurricane Patricia in the southern coast of the state of Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Maria del Refugio Ruiz Bravo sets out to dry personal belongings soaked by Hurricane Patricia, in La Fortuna, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Record-breaking Patricia pushed rapidly inland over mountainous western Mexico early Saturday, weakening to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
View of a damaged restaurant in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
MELAQUE, MEXICO - OCTOBER 24: A worker cleans out the 'Monterey' Hotel after damage from Hurricane Patricia October 24, 2015 in Melaque, Jalisco, Mexico. Hurricane Patricia struck Mexico's West coast as the most powerful storm ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere but rapidly lost energy as it moved inland. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
A wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mexican soldiers patrol looking for people who ask for help after the passage of hurricane Patricia in El Rebalse community, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Artificial flowers sit on a makeshift shelf in the home of Sergio Reyna Ruiz, a day after Hurricane Patricia tore off a section of the roof, in La Fortuna, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Just next door the home of Reyna's sister, suffered much more damage, as winds tore off most of the roof, soaking mattresses and destroying the belongings of the seven-person family. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A local resident in his wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
MEXICO - 2015/10/25: A farmer harvests papaya fruit from the uprooted plants in Michoacan's coast. Hurricane Patricia hit the southwestern Mexico and Categorized as storm 5, bringing lashing rains, surging seas and cyclonic winds hours after it peaked, it is one of the strongest storms ever recorded. (Photo by Armando Solis/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Chamela community, Jalisco State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Chamela community, Jalisco State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents stand outside their flooded house in Zoatlan, Nayarit state, some 150 km northwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia made landfall Friday on a sparsely populated stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 storm, avoiding direct hits on the resort city of Puerto Vallarta and major port city of Manzanillo as it weakened to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Men remove protective wood beams from the front of a business the morning after Hurricane Patricia passed further south sparing Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. The storm made landfall Friday evening on Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 165 mph (270 kph) but it is rapidly losing steam as it moves over a mountainous region inland from the shore.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
CUASTECOMATES, MEXICO - OCTOBER 24: A truck sits covered in tree branches on October 24, 2015 in Cuastecomates, Mexico. The damage was caused by Hurricane Patricia, which struck Mexico's West coast yesterday afternoon and left minor flooding and damage. Cuastecomates is near Barra de Navidad, which was where the center of the hurricane hit. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Manzanillo-Colima roadin Colima State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A restaurant partially destroyed by hurricane Patricia in Las Manzanillas, Jalisco state, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican soldier stands guard in a banana plantation after the passage of hurricane Patricia in El Rebalse community, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
TECOMAN MX - OCTOBER 24: A truck drives through a flooded out turn off at the entrance to the city after heavy flooding from Hurriane Patricia October 24, 2015 in Tecoman, Colima, Mexico. Hurricane Patricia struck Mexico's West coast as the most powerful storm ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere but rapidly lost energy as it moved inland. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
A man stares at the sea in a partially destroyed street in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
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Patricia rapidly intensified into the strongest hurricane on record early Friday morning and slammed into southwestern Mexico Friday evening with catastrophic force.

The mountainous terrain of Mexico caused Patricia to weaken rapidly, but reached the northwestern Gulf of Mexico as a tropical rainstorm.

Winds created by the storm system will reach gale force at times along the Alabama and Florida Panhandle coast on Monday.

The winds blowing onshore could lead to coastal flooding, especially during high tide.

Patricia flooding

Drier air will gradually sweep in from west to east across Texas and Louisiana during the first part of the new week. At the same time, tropical moisture will be spreading to the Midwest and Eastern U.S., leading to the most significant rainfall in a few weeks for many of those communities.

Even as the rain comes to an end and smaller streams and rivers return to their banks, larger rivers may rise as the flood waters drain downstream. This includes the Trinity River in eastern Texas.

There is a long-term benefit to the torrential rain inundating the South Central states--ending the unusually dry spell that resulted in extreme to exceptional drought conditions developing across nearly a quarter of the area from Texas and Oklahoma to Mississippi.

Content contributed by AccuWeather Meteorologists Alex Sosnowski and Brett Rathbun.

PHOTOS: Hurricane Patricia's path across the South

37 PHOTOS
Hurricane Patricia storm photos, satellite photos and evacuations
See Gallery
Patricia to spread flood threat from Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle on Monday
IN SPACE - In this handout photo provided by NASA, Hurricane Patricia is seen from the International Space Station. The hurricane made landfall on the Pacfic coast of Mexico on October 23. (Photo by Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)
This satellite image taken at 10:45 a.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Patricia moving over Mexico's Pacific Coast. Hurricane Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (NOAA via AP)
View of a breakwater following the passage of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 24 ,2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
View of a street in Manzanillo, Colima state, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. The strongest hurricane ever recorded crashed into Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, ratcheting up fears that super-storm Patricia will unleash death and destruction with its powerful winds and driving rain. AFP PHOTO / Jonathan Levinson (Photo credit should read Jonathan Levinson/AFP/Getty Images)
View of the street during the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Municipal workers collect branches from a flooded street in Manzanillo, Colima state, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. The strongest hurricane ever recorded crashed into Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, ratcheting up fears that super-storm Patricia will unleash death and destruction with its powerful winds and driving rain. AFP PHOTO / Jonathan Levinson (Photo credit should read Jonathan Levinson/AFP/Getty Images)
View of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Puerto Vallarta #Huracán @Patricia https://t.co/sEEBdzwbdG
Hurricane Patricia https://t.co/Om0nKibkMY
VIDEO: Hurricane #Patricia: in Cihuatlán in the state of Colima. Palm trees figting against wind. https://t.co/urNul5eiIJ v @alezrodriguez
Members of the Red Cross prepare a temporary shelter in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mexican soldiers patrol streets during the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mike Anderson of Minnesota, right, fishes alongside his friend and local fisherman Miguel Pilas during a steady rain as Hurricane Patricia approaches Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Hurricane Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
This satellite image taken at 8:45 p.m. EDT on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Patricia, left, moving over Mexico's central Pacific Coast. The powerful Category 4 storm bore down on Mexico's central Pacific Coast on Thursday night, for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding. (NOAA via AP)
This satellite image taken at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Patricia. Hurricane Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (NOAA/RAMMB/CIRA via AP)
This image taken Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, from the International Space Station shows Hurricane Patricia. The Category 5 storm, the strongest recorded in the Western Hemisphere, barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday. (Scott Kelly/NASA via AP)
This satellite image taken at 1:45 p.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, and released by NASA, shows the eastern quadrant and pinhole eye of Hurricane Patricia moving towards southwestern Mexico. The Category 5 storm is strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere, according to forecasters. (NOAA GOES Project/NASA via AP)
A couple looks out to sea as rainfall increases with the approach of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Hurricane Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Residents prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia filling sand bags to protect beachfront businesses, in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. Locals and tourists were either hunkering down or trying to make last-minute escapes ahead of what forecasters called a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Mexican and international tourists board a bus to be transported to a shelter, bracing for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Teams of police and civil protection are walking along Puerto Vallarta's waterfront, advising people to evacuate. A top civil protection official says that three airports in the path of Patricia in southwestern Mexico have been shut down as the storm approaches. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell
People seeking safety from Hurricane Patricia, stand in line to be taken to another shelter because the one they had just arrived at was full, in the Pacific resort city Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. Residents and tourists were hunkering down or trying to make last-minute escapes ahead of what forecasters called a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
Evacuees remain at a shelter in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl rests on the floor amidst her family as they await the arrival of Hurricane Patricia in a small shelter run by the Red Cross in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Hurricane Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A worker boards up the front of a waterfront business, as residents prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Patricia barreled toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere. Locals and tourists were either hunkering down or trying to make last-minute escapes ahead of what forecasters called a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
View of street at Boca de Pascuales community as residents are evacuated by local authorities before the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Colima State, Mexico on October 22,2015. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Men fill small bags with sand from the beach as they prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A worker carries a table at a seaside restaurant preparing for the arrival of hurricane Patricia in the Pacific resort city of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Hurricane Patricia grew into a monster, Category 5 storm and bore down on Mexicoâs central Pacific Coast, on or near Puerto Vallarta, on Thursday night for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, are evacuated on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
An employee rolls up matts at a Sheraton beachfront hotel as staff prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia, in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 23, 2015. Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A man leaves his house in Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
People preparing for the arrival of hurricane Patricia board up the windows of a seaside business in the Pacific resort city of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Hurricane Patricia grew into a monster, Category 5 storm and bore down on Mexicoâs central Pacific Coast, on or near Puerto Vallarta, on Thursday night for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
People preparing for the arrival of Hurricane Patricia break down their souvenir shop in the Pacific resort city Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Patricia headed toward southwestern Mexico Friday as a monster Category 5 storm, the strongest ever in the Western Hemisphere that forecasters said could make a "potentially catastrophic landfall" later in the day. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
People preparing for the arrival of hurricane Patricia board up a souvenir shop in the Pacific resort city of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Hurricane Patricia grew into a monster, Category 5 storm and bore down on Mexicoâs central Pacific Coast, on or near Puerto Vallarta, on Thursday night for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, are evacuated on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Waves break on the beach in Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, on October 22, 2015. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
People throw stones into the ocean as hurricane Patricia nears in the Pacific resort city of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. Hurricane Patricia grew into a monster, Category 5 storm and bore down on Mexicoâs central Pacific Coast, on or near Puerto Vallarta, on Thursday night for what forecasters said could be a devastating blow, as officials declared a state of emergency and handed out sandbags in preparation for flooding. (AP Photo/Cesar Rodriguez)
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