Photograph of the alleged iceberg that sank Titanic sells for staggering sum

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Photo of Actual Titanic Iceberg May Fetch $10,000 at Auction

A photograph can be worth more than 1,000 words -- especially if it's an image related to the Titanic.

A picture recently put up for auction that showcases the infamous iceberg believed to have sunk the Titanic sold on Saturday for over $32,000. The picture was taken by the chief stewart on Prinz Adalbert, a steamer that passed the through the site of the collision just hours after the boat sank. Scientists believe that the iceberg in the photograph is the exact match due to the fact that a streak of red paint covers its side, indicating it was scraped by a passing ship.

The auction was held by Henry Aldridge & Son in the UK, where they sold other memorabilia from the wreckage.

To see more past auction items, scroll through the gallery below:

5 PHOTOS
Last Titanic lunch menu going to auction
See Gallery
Photograph of the alleged iceberg that sank Titanic sells for staggering sum
This undated photo provided by Lion Heart Autographs shows the Titanic’s last lunch menu, which is going to auction and is estimated to bring $50,000 to $70,000. The menu - saved by a passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down - will be sold by Lion Heart Autographs, an online New York auctioneer, along with two other previously unknown artifacts from Lifeboat 1 on Sept. 30, 2015. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. (Lion Heart Autographs via AP)
This undated photo provided by Lion Heart Autographs shows a printed ticket from the Titanic’s opulent Turkish baths, which could bring $7,500 to $10,000 when it is sold with two other previously unknown artifacts fon Sept. 30, 2015. The ticket and a menu from the liner's last lunch - saved by a passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down - will be sold by Lion Heart Autographs, an online New York auctioneer. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. (Lion Heart Autographs via AP)
This undated photo provided by Lion Heart Autographs shows a letter by one of the survivors of the sinking of the Titanic written six months after the disaster, which could fetch $4,000 to $6,000. The letter - saved by a fellow passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down - will be sold by Lion Heart Autographs, along with two other previously unknown artifacts from Lifeboat 1 on Sept. 30, 2015. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. (Lion Heart Autographs via AP)
This undated photo provided by Lion Heart Autographs shows a letter by one of the survivors of the sinking of the Titanic written six months after the disaster, which could fetch $4,000 to $6,000. The letter - saved by a fellow passenger who climbed aboard the so-called “Money Boat” before the ocean liner went down - will be sold by Lion Heart Autographs, along with two other previously unknown artifacts from Lifeboat 1 on Sept. 30, 2015. The auction marks the 30th anniversary of the wreckage’s discovery at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. (Lion Heart Autographs via AP)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


The photograph itself may be the only item left from the iceberg itself, since most likely it would have only survived several more years before melting completely.

More from AOL.com:
Thousands of ducklings race to the water for their first swim
US skier Ligety wins season-opening World Cup giant slalom
President Obama cites 'Grumpy Cat' while mocking republicans

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners