Hurricane Patricia to intensify heavy rains in Texas, 10M under flood watch

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Heavy rains that brought a flood threat to North and Central Texas are expected to spread into South Texas over the weekend, as a stalled cold front causing the downpours is reinforced by remnants of Hurricane Patricia, which struck Mexico Friday evening.

Much of the Texas heartland was under a flash flood watch early Saturday as the National Weather Service expected the Austin-San Antonio area to receive up to a foot of rain while already inundated sections of North Texas were expected to experience up to 7 more inches of rain.

SEE MORE: Patricia becomes strongest storm to ever make landfall

More than 13 inches of rain fell in Corsicana, south of Dallas, from midnight Friday through early Saturday, the National Weather Service said.

Cars were reported stranded in downtown Corsicana and Interstate 45 was closed because of flooding, officials said. NBC Dallas-Fort Worth reported that the closure resulted in a 12-mile backup.

"We're telling anybody who manages to get off the highway and into Corsicana to find a parking lot and spend the night in their car. Nobody needs to be out there in the rain at night," Navarro County Judge H.M. Davenport told The Associated Press.

"It's one of those things where all the ingredients come together," Lamont Bain, a meteorologist in the National Weather Service's Fort Worth office, said.

Over 10 million people in the south-central U.S. face potential flash flooding as a slow-moving storm dumps heavy rain through the weekend.

Click through to see more of the aftermath of the historic storm:

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Hurricane Patricia to intensify heavy rains in Texas, 10M under flood watch
View of a street in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, partially destroyed after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
A sofa and refrigerator lie among the debris of homes destroyed by Hurricane Patricia, in Chamela, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Record-breaking Patricia pushed rapidly inland over mountainous western Mexico early Saturday, weakening to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Soldiers help a woman to leave her flooded house to take her to a shelter in Zoatlan, Nayarit state, some 150 km northwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia made landfall Friday on a sparsely populated stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 storm, avoiding direct hits on the resort city of Puerto Vallarta and major port city of Manzanillo as it weakened to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Aerial view of of Manzanillo beach in Colima State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents of the Chamela community return to their homes after the passage of hurricane Patricia in the southern coast of the state of Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Maria del Refugio Ruiz Bravo sets out to dry personal belongings soaked by Hurricane Patricia, in La Fortuna, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Record-breaking Patricia pushed rapidly inland over mountainous western Mexico early Saturday, weakening to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
View of a damaged restaurant in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
MELAQUE, MEXICO - OCTOBER 24: A worker cleans out the 'Monterey' Hotel after damage from Hurricane Patricia October 24, 2015 in Melaque, Jalisco, Mexico. Hurricane Patricia struck Mexico's West coast as the most powerful storm ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere but rapidly lost energy as it moved inland. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
A wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mexican soldiers patrol looking for people who ask for help after the passage of hurricane Patricia in El Rebalse community, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Artificial flowers sit on a makeshift shelf in the home of Sergio Reyna Ruiz, a day after Hurricane Patricia tore off a section of the roof, in La Fortuna, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Just next door the home of Reyna's sister, suffered much more damage, as winds tore off most of the roof, soaking mattresses and destroying the belongings of the seven-person family. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A local resident in his wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
MEXICO - 2015/10/25: A farmer harvests papaya fruit from the uprooted plants in Michoacan's coast. Hurricane Patricia hit the southwestern Mexico and Categorized as storm 5, bringing lashing rains, surging seas and cyclonic winds hours after it peaked, it is one of the strongest storms ever recorded. (Photo by Armando Solis/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Chamela community, Jalisco State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Chamela community, Jalisco State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents stand outside their flooded house in Zoatlan, Nayarit state, some 150 km northwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia made landfall Friday on a sparsely populated stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 storm, avoiding direct hits on the resort city of Puerto Vallarta and major port city of Manzanillo as it weakened to tropical storm force while dumping torrential rains that authorities warned could cause deadly floods and mudslides. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Men remove protective wood beams from the front of a business the morning after Hurricane Patricia passed further south sparing Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. The storm made landfall Friday evening on Mexico's Pacific coast as a Category 5 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 165 mph (270 kph) but it is rapidly losing steam as it moves over a mountainous region inland from the shore.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A wrecked house in the Chamela community after the passage of hurricane Patricia in southern Jalisco, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
CUASTECOMATES, MEXICO - OCTOBER 24: A truck sits covered in tree branches on October 24, 2015 in Cuastecomates, Mexico. The damage was caused by Hurricane Patricia, which struck Mexico's West coast yesterday afternoon and left minor flooding and damage. Cuastecomates is near Barra de Navidad, which was where the center of the hurricane hit. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Manzanillo-Colima roadin Colima State, Mexico on October 24, 2015 after the passage of hurricane Patricia. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/MARIO VAZQUEZ (Photo credit should read MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A restaurant partially destroyed by hurricane Patricia in Las Manzanillas, Jalisco state, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican soldier stands guard in a banana plantation after the passage of hurricane Patricia in El Rebalse community, Mexico on October 24, 2015. Patricia flattened dozens of homes on Mexico's Pacific coast, but authorities said Saturday the record-breaking hurricane largely spared the country as it weakened to a tropical depression. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
TECOMAN MX - OCTOBER 24: A truck drives through a flooded out turn off at the entrance to the city after heavy flooding from Hurriane Patricia October 24, 2015 in Tecoman, Colima, Mexico. Hurricane Patricia struck Mexico's West coast as the most powerful storm ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere but rapidly lost energy as it moved inland. (Photo by Brett Gundlock/Getty Images)
A man stares at the sea in a partially destroyed street in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco state, after Hurricane Patricia hit the shore on October 24, 2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
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Up to a foot of rain could hit Galveston County by Sunday afternoon, and officials on Friday considered a voluntary evacuation of Bolivar Peninsula but will reevaluate the situation Saturday.

More than 7 inches of rain fell parts on Bosque County southwest of Fort-Worth, since the rain began on Thursday, the NWS said Friday evening. Grapevine in Tarrant County got nearly 8 inches over 36 hours, according to the weather service.

Most of central and southeastern Texas were under flood watches Friday night.

"Heaviest rains are expected late (Friday) through Saturday night with the heavy rain threat expected to shift east on Sunday," the National Weather Service said.

More than 262 flights at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport were cancelled by 6 p.m. local time (7 p.m. ET, NBC Dallas-Fort Worth reported.

Storms pounded western Texas on Thursday night, causing floods that lifted mobile homes off their foundations in Rankin, about 300 miles northwest of Austin, and causing numerous road accidents in Abilene and Odessa.

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