Egyptian women candidates work the campaign trail

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Egyptian women candidates work the campaign trail
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, an independent candidate, waves from a vehicle as she campaigns in her neighborhood in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The 40 year-old woman is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time to run in elections, and says her family has been supportive of the move. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, volunteer Nehal Mohamed makes phone calls to elderly citizens citizens who live in the neighborhood to let them know the location of their polling station, at the headquarters for Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, an independent candidate for parliament, in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, an independent candidate, center, makes last-minute preparations at her campaign headquarters in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The 40 year-old woman is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time to run in elections, and says her family has been supportive of the move. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, Egyptian boys dance to a song for Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, an independent candidate for parliament, whose picture is seen on a banner, near her campaign headquarters in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. Hakeem is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time to running in an election and she says her family has been supportive. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, campaign posters for Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, an independent candidate for parliament, are seen near her campaign headquarters in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections later this month. Hakeem is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time to running in an election and she says her family has been supportive. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015 photo, Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem, 40, an independent candidate, center, makes last-minute preparations at her campaign headquarters in Giza, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections later this month. Hakeem is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time to run in an election and she says her family has been supportive. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, Egyptian supporters of the For The Love of Egypt list attend a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections that start later this month. The conference was organized by Sahar Talaat Mostafa a businesswoman and a candidate on the list that was put together by a prominent retired army officer. The list includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, Sahar Talaat Mostafa, a businesswoman and a candidate with the For the Love of Egypt list leaves the headquarters of her family's company to attend a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list was put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, a billboard on a truck displays pictures of candidates from the For The Love of Egypt list as it moves through the street as part of their campaign, in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list put together by a prominent retired army officer also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, Sahar Talaat Mostafa, a businesswoman and a candidate with the For the Love of Egypt list attends a campaign rally in a parade if cars and buses in Alexandria, Egypt ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list was put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, Egyptian volunteers from the For the Love of Egypt list participate in a march by buses and cars as part of an election campaign in Alexandria, Egypt ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015 photo, Sahar Talaat Mostafa, a businesswoman and a candidate with the For the Love of Egypt list attends a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
Sahar Talaat Mostafa, a businesswoman and a candidate with the For the Love of Egypt list attends a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. The list put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 photo, Hanan Allam, the president of the women's committee and a candidate from the Salafi Al-Nour party, front row left, and Hasnaa Hassan, another candidate, front row second right, attend a women's campaign rally of their party in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law for all party lists, the ultraconservative Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates. Al-Nour supported the military-led ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi and his now-banned Muslim Brotherhood. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 photo, Hanan Allam a candidate from the Al--Nour party, speaks with journalists after attending a women's campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law for all party lists, the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates. Among the women is Allam, a 45-year-old pediatrician and head of the women's committee at Al-Nour party, which supported the military-led ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi and his now-banned Muslim Brotherhood. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 photo, Sanaa al-Fardy, a candidate from the ultraconservative Islamist Salafi Al-Nour party, center, speaks with an organizer before her speech in a women's campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. Two years after supporting the armyâs overthrow of an elected Islamist president, Mohammed Morsi, Al-Nour is attempting a delicate balancing act: maintaining their appeal to an ultraconservative base either disillusioned with politics or disgusted by the partyâs past conduct, while reaching out to the political center on promises to unify and rebuild a polarized country. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 photo, Hanan Allam, a candidate from the Al--Nour party, right, speaks with a woman at a women's campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law for all party lists, the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates. Among the women is Allam, a 45-year-old pediatrician and head of the women's committee of Al-Nour, which supported the military-led ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi and his now-banned Muslim Brotherhood. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 photo, Egyptian Salafi women leave a theater where they attended a campaign rally of the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law for all party lists, the Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates.(AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 photo, Hanan Allam, president of the women's committee and a candidate from the Al-Nour party, speaks at a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law upon all party lists, the Salafi Al-Nour party is fielding seven women out of the 15 candidates in each of its two party lists. Among the women is Allam, a 45-year-old pediatrician and head of the women's committee at Al-Nour party, which supported the military-led ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi and his now-banned Muslim Brotherhood.(AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 photo, Egyptian Salafi women wave the Egyptian flag from a microbus on their way to attend a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law for all party lists, the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 photo, Hanan Allam, center, a candidate for parliament from the Al-Nour party, waits for organizers to prepare her chair to sit beside the other candidates on the stage at a campaign rally in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections. As required by law upon all party lists, the Salafi Al-Nour party is fielding seven women out of the 15 candidates in each of its two party lists. Among the women is Allam, a 45-year-old pediatrician and head of the women's committee at Al-Nour party, which supported the military-led ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi and his now-banned Muslim Brotherhood. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 photo, Egyptian Salafists attend a campaign rally of the Islamist Al-Nour party in Alexandria, Egypt, ahead of Egyptian parliamentary elections that start later this month. The organizers separate women and men with a green rope. Two years after lending their support to the military overthrow of the Brotherhoodâs Mohammed Morsi, Egyptâs first freely elected president, the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party is attempting a delicate balancing act: maintaining their appeal to an ultraconservative base either disillusioned with politics or disgusted by the partyâs past conduct, while reaching out to the political center on promises to unify and rebuild a polarized country. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
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ALEXANDRIA, Egypt (AP) — Riding through neighborhoods waving to constituents and glad-handing supporters, three Egyptian women candidates work the campaign trail.

The trio represents three major groups running in the country's parliamentary election, with voting in Egypt starting Sunday. It's Egypt's first parliamentary election since the military-led ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in 2013.

Independent candidate 40-year-old Asmaa Ahmed Abdel Hakeem is a manager of a family-owned school. It's her first time running in an election and she says her family has been supportive.

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Independent candidates will take up 448 seats, or 75 percent of the seats. Party lists will make up 120 seats, or 20 percent of the parliament.

As required by law for all party lists, the ultraconservative Salafi Al-Nour party has seven women on each of its two party lists of 15 candidates. Among them is Hanan Allam, a 45-year-old pediatrician and head of the party's women's committee.

Sahar Talaat Mostafa is running under For the Love of Egypt, a list put together by a prominent retired army officer that also includes candidates who are former government ministers and high-profile businessmen. It supports President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi and is seen as the front-running list.

Mostafa is the sister of real estate tycoon Hisham Talaat Moustafa, once a prominent member of Egypt's ruling party during former autocrat Hosni Mubarak's era. The businessman was sentenced in 2010 to 15 years in prison for conspiring to murder 30-year-old Lebanese singer Suzanne Tamim.

Here is a series of photos taken by Associated Press photographer Eman Helal, who followed the candidates on the campaign trail.

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Associated Press photographers and photo editors on Twitter: http://apne.ws/15Oo6jo

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Follow Eman Helal on Twitter: www.twitter.com/emanhelal9

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