6 facts about world poverty that will truly put things into perspective

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The World's Poverty - in 50 Seconds

Did you know that half of the world's population lives on less than $2.50 per day? Think about this for a second. That's probably less than your morning coffee.

On October 17th each year, the United Nations hosts the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (also known as World Poverty Day). The Day aims to bring the much needed attention back to the millions of people living in poverty right now.

Although we all know that poverty is an extreme global epidemic, many of us don't know exactly how to help. When you see these blistering facts written out, it truly makes the issue impossible to ignore.

Here are 6 shocking facts on world poverty, and links to how you can help:

1.) The Hunger Project



Somalia Refugees

2.) The Solar Electric Light Fund



IRAQ-CONFLICT-DAILYLIFE

3.) Against Malaria Foundation



Congo Violence Without End

4.) Action Against Hunger



India World Food Day

5.) Give Directly



One of the biggest slums in the world "Kibera"

6.) United Way



Los Angeles Mayor Declares State Of Emergency Over Homelessness Problem In City
Learn more about the Los Angeles homeless crisis:

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Los Angeles homeless
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6 facts about world poverty that will truly put things into perspective
A woman at a homeless encampment in downtown Los Angeles, California on August 31, 2015. A Quinnipiac University National poll released August 31 alleges that a total of 71 percent of American voters are 'dissatisfied' with the way things are going in the nation today. AFP PHOTO/ Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless woman pushes her cart full of belongings along a street in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless woman sits on a wheelchair outside her tent along a street in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless man sets up his tent along a street in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless woman pushes her cart of belongings along a street in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless man sets up his tent (R) as a homeless woman nearby checks her cellphone while resting her feet on a cart full of belongings in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A homeless woman pulls her cart full of belongings along a street in Los Angeles, California on August 25, 2015. According to a report released today by the Economic Roundtable, a nonprofit research group in Los Angeles, some 13,000 people tumble into homelessness every month in Los Angeles County, where the latest official count of the homeless found 44,000 people living along county streets during a three-day period in January, a increase of 12% in two years. AFP PHOTO /FREDERIC J.BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 19: Homeless sleep on the sidewalks in Venice Beach in Los Angeles, CA on July 19, 2015. Venice is changing. While it retains a bohemian vibe it is becoming more gentrified. At the same time homelessnes is on the rise. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 19: 'Susan' lives on the street in Venice in Los Angeles, CA on July 19, 2015. She said that she has been in Venice for two years but has been homeless since she was 5. Venice is changing. While it retains a bohemian vibe it is becoming more gentrified. At the same time homelessnes is on the rise. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 19: 'Susan' lives on the street in Venice in Los Angeles, CA on July 19, 2015. She said that she has been in Venice for two years but has been homeless since she was 5. Venice is changing. While it retains a bohemian vibe it is becoming more gentrified. At the same time homelessnes is on the rise. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Tents used by the homeless line a downtown Los Angeles street with the skyline behind Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Los Angeles officials say they will declare a state of emergency on homelessness and propose spending $100 million to reduce the number of people living on city streets. City Council President Herb Wesson, members of the council's Homelessness and Poverty Committee and Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the plan Tuesday outside City Hall, as homeless people dozed nearby on a lawn.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, City Council President Herb Wesson, center, and Council member Curren Price, Jr., far right, stand with members of the council's Homelessness and Poverty Committee to announce a homelessness emergency plan outside City Hall in Los Angeles Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Los Angeles officials declared a state of emergency on homelessness and propose spending $100 million to reduce the number of people living on city streets. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
A man rides a bike past unmatched women's shoes for sale lined up along the curb Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Skid Row, an area in downtown Los Angeles, is home to thousands of homeless people. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A homeless woman sits under an umbrella, Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, in downtown Los Angeles. Much of California simmered in a stew of high heat and humidity on Thursday, bracing for more thunderstorms and flash floods that have already killed one person and left scattered damage and power outages. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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