Republicans are putting all of their money on Paul Ryan

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Paul Ryan a Hot Name Among High-Ranking Republicans

The Republican race for House speaker has ground to a halt as all eyes focus on one potential candidate: Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin).

Since the expected front-runner — House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-California) — stunned Washington and announced that he would drop out of the race, major Republican Party figures have been virtually begging Ryan to step up and take the position, citing Ryan's potential ability to unify an increasingly fractured caucus.

McCarthy was long the favorite to replace current House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio). But it became increasingly clear that McCarthy would not have the support of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of more hard-line conservative lawmakers who have banded together to block Republicans from making concessions to Democrats on key pieces of legislation.

Click through to see more of Kevin McCarthy, who ended his run for speaker on Thursday:

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Republicans are putting all of their money on Paul Ryan
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 30: House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., leaves the House chamber following a vote on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
US House of Representatives' majority leader Kevin Owen McCarthy speaks during a meeting at the King David Hotel in Jerusalem on August 13, 2015. McCarthy is leading 36 US Republican congressmen on a trip to the region to meet IsraelI and Palestinian officials as well as academics and journalists. AFP PHOTO / GALI TIBBON (Photo credit should read GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, listens during a news conference after a House Republican Conference meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., Tuesday, July 28, 2015. The U.S. House plans to vote on a three-month highway funding bill Wednesday and leave for a summer break without considering a longer-term measure now before the Senate, Speaker John Boehner said. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JUNE 24: Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, left, and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., participate in the House GOP leadership media availability following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 2: House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrives to speak to the media following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, June 2, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) ? Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) appears on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday March 1, 2015. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-CA, speaks during an event to urge US President Barack Obama to sign the Keystone XL legislation on February 11, 2015 in the Rayburn Room of the US Capitol in Washington, DC. Congress was set Wednesday to green-light the Keystone XL pipeline transporting Canadian oil to US refineries, but President Barack Obama is pledging to veto the measure. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 13: U.S. President Barack Obama (R) speaks as Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) (3rd L), House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (2nd L), and House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (L) listen during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House January 13, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama met with congressional leaders to discuss issues including the economy and the nationals security. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 06: House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., takes a picture before the 114th Congress was sworn in on the House floor of the Capitol, January 6, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 13: House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., participates in the press conference announcing House GOP leadership for upcoming session of Congress on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 9: House Majority Leader elect Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., with House Majority Whip elect Steve Scalise, R-La., looking on, speaks during the House GOP leadership media availability after the House Republican Conference meeting in the basement of the Capitol on Wednesday, July 9, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
New Majority Leader of the US House of Representatives Kevin McCarthy arrives to speak during the Faith and Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority Conference on June 20, 2014 in Washington,DC. AFP PHOTO/Nicholas KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 20: House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) addresses the Faith and Freedom Coalition's 'Road to Majority' Policy Conference at the Omni Shoreham hotel June 20, 2014 in Washington, DC. In the wake of Majority Leader Eric Cantor's decision to resign, McCarthy was elected majority leader by the House Republican conference Thursday. Led by the Christian political activist Ralph Reed, the coalition heard from conservative politicians who are courting religious conservatives as they eye a run for the White House. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 19: (L-R) Speaking to the media, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA), Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR), Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH), the newly elected House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) after the secret ballot voting in the House leader and House Whip races at the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC Thursday June 19, 2014. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17: House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) speaks to reporters in his bid to be Leader of the House before the upcoming House leadership vote Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC Tuesday June 17, 2014. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 11: Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is trailed by reporters while walking through Statuary Hall the U.S. Capitol building, June 11, 2014 in Washington, DC. Yesterday House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) lost his Virginia primary to Tea Party challenger Dave Brat, opening a slot for Majority Leader. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 25: U.S. Congress member Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) during Music Policy and the U.S. Congress: An Insider's Briefing, A GRAMMY Townhall at The Wilshire Ebell Theatre on January 25, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Mark Sullivan/WireImage)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 16: Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks to reporters during the media availability immediately after the House Republican Conference meeting at Republican National Committee headquarters on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, April 16, 2013. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) ? Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD,) left, and Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA,) right, appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday, March 17, 2013. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
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Following his decision to drop out of the race, McCarthy almost instantly began prodding Ryan. Boehner, meanwhile, moved quickly to meet with Ryan, reportedly urging him to "step up" and take the position.

National Republican leaders also threw their weight behind Ryan.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R), a former 2016 presidential candidate, tweeted his support for Ryan, citing Ryan's past decisions to forego leadership positions in favor of policy-making roles.

But the full-court press demonstrates perhaps the biggest problem of the speaker race: Ryan doesn't seem to want the job.

The 45-year-old chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee has repeatedly rebuffed attempts to draw him into the House leadership apparatus, staying put during a leadership shuffle last year after former House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Virginia) lost his primary to a conservative challenger.

SEE MORE: McCarthy abruptly withdraws candidacy for House speaker

And less than an hour after McCarthy's exit from the race, Ryan released a statement again denying his interest in the position.

"While I am grateful for the encouragement I've received, I will not be a candidate," Ryan said in a statement. "I continue to believe I can best serve the country and this conference as Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee."

Again Friday morning, Ryan's office released another statement curtailing his interest in the position.

"Chairman Ryan appreciates the support he's getting from his colleagues but is still not running for Speaker," Ryan spokesman Brendan Buck said in a statement Friday morning.

Some observers attribute this to his desire to spend time with his family — being speaker isn't very conducive to that — and a dislike of the speaker's intense fundraising schedule.

But others note that Ryan could be playing a long game to achieve other goals beyond party leadership.

Ryan has been particularly vocal about playing a major role in reforming the tax code, a goal he could have a good chance of achieving if a Republican is elected to the White House in 2016. And there's always the chance that Ryan, the 2012 Republican vice presidential nominee, could seek a White House bid himself.

But with few clear alternatives in mind, the pressure may be too much for Ryan to resist.​

Though he did not speak at a party caucus meeting on Friday, CNN and other outlets reported that Ryan is now considering running for speaker. Even some of Ryan's potential rivals for the speakership have said that they would support his bid.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) told reporters on Friday that he would "absolutely" not run against Ryan if he decides to jump in the race. And Rep. Darrell Issa (R-California) said that he'll only consider running if Ryan gets out, and that he already met with Ryan to urge him to run.

"If he doesn't run, I'll ask him to reconsider," Issa repeated twice while walking briskly past reporters.

But even as allies heaped praise on Ryan, there were reminders on Friday that he'll still have to wrangle an increasingly fractured caucus.

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), a member of the Freedom Caucus, told reporters that although he respected Ryan, he could not support him because of the congressman's support for the 2008 bailout of the financial industry, a bipartisan move that was opposed by some arch-conservatives.

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