Some areas in flooded South Carolina facing second deluge

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Aerial View of South Carolina Flood Damage

South Carolina's governor warned on Thursday that several coastal areas were about to be hit by a second round of major flooding, while residents inland hauled soaked furniture and appliances from homes left in ruins by unprecedented rainfall.

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Governor Nikki Haley said the inundation expected in Georgetown, home to about 9,000 people, would last up to 12 days and she urged residents to heed evacuation notices.

"Don't underestimate the power of water," she told a news conference in Summerville.

See images of the aftermath of the South Carolina floods:

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South Carolina Flood Aftermath
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Some areas in flooded South Carolina facing second deluge
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 8: Lin McKenney sorts through belongings of a friend outside a flood damaged home in the Gills Creek area October 8, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and officials expect the costs of the catastrophic flooding to be in the billions. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 8: Volunteers help clean up a home in the Gills Creek area October 8, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and officials expect the costs of the catastrophic flooding to be in the billions. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 8: People arrive to begin cleanup on a flooded home October 8, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and officials expect the costs of the catastrophic flooding to be in the billions. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Frazer Eades, at left, Jay Ashby, center, and Scott Youngblood prepare the furniture store Augustus & Carolina with plastic and sandbags before high tide hits historic downtown Georgetown, S.C., Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Gov. Nikki Haley held a press conference telling Georgetown residents to prepare for floodwaters. Many store owners in the historic district have prepared for repeated flooding over the course of a week. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
George Jenkins, at left, and Edward Williams, both with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, watch floodwaters caused by high tide begin to flood Dorchester Road again as their pump cannot keep up at Sawmill Branch Canal in Summerville, S.C., Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Dorchester Road had just recently been opened to traffic but officials were still having problems with rising floodwaters. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Tombstones reflect in the floodwaters at Canaan United Methodist Church near Summerville, S.C., Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. The church had a couple caskets come out of the ground at their cemetery beside the church during the flooding this week. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Harold Ancrum, a church member at Canaan United Methodist Church, checks on the floodwaters at the church near Summerville, S.C., Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. The church had some caskets come out of the ground at their cemetery beside the church during the flooding this week. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
AP10ThingsToSee - A resident looks down Mayfield St. as water from the Ashley River floods the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Wendy Dixon weeps as she leaves her flood-damaged apartment Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. In the Columbia area, where some returned home to assess damage and clean up, the threat of more flooding still hadn't lifted. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Asiah Lewis comes home to her apartment in Summerton, S.C. on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015, three days after severe flooding forced her and other residents to evacuate. The apartment Lewis shares with her four children and her mother took on about six inches of water as record rainfall drenched South Carolina. Now her family is staying at a shelter with no guarantee how quickly the apartment will be cleaned and repaired. (AP Photo/Russ Bynum)
A pickup truck lies submerged in Gill Creek in the wake of flooding in Columbia, S.C. Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. Heavy rain has caused flooding in parts of the state. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Republican candidate for president Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-SC, climbs over debris as he tours a neighborhood damaged by flooding, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Cathy Stinson, right, and Maria Mayer, left, help a friend remove belongings from her flooded home in Forest Acres in Columbia, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Rankin Craig watches as friends and family remove belongings from her flooded home in Forest Acres in Columbia, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
A pickup truck is submerged by an auto parts store along E. Main Street in downtown Kingstree, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. The Black River flooded into parts of Kingstree. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Devon Farley, left, and Ben Cooper remove damaged flooring and wallboard from a flooded home in Columbia, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Work crews use an pumps to lower water levels and stabilize a dam at a lake, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. Heavy rain has caused flooding in parts of the state. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
A man clears debris outside a flood damaged home in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Members of a FEMA search and rescue unit unload a search dog as they preper to check a a flooded area in Eastover, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Blair Moore saves what he can as he cleans up after his home was flooded Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
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Seventeen people have died after historic rains in the southeastern state, including 11 drownings and six traffic fatalities. The resulting floods caused 14 dam failures and at least $300 million in crop losses, officials said on Thursday.

Haley called the damage "tragic," with roads destroyed, homes deluged and farms left unrecognizable by the huge volume of water. Nearly two dozen caskets were disinterred by floodwaters in cemeteries, the state said.

In Charleston County, emergency management officials told residents living near the Edisto and Santee Rivers to monitor water levels as those bodies of water threatened to flood.

In Columbia, where about 11 inches (28 cm) of rain fell over the weekend, residents in a neighborhood ravaged by the first wave of flooding donned gloves and masks as they started clearing their homes of ruined possessions.

Streets in the Lake Katherine community were lined with mud-soaked mattresses, soggy tables and rolled-up carpets. Dead fish could be seen among the debris.

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Retired pilot Vince Hood and his wife Karen spent the day with hired workers and volunteers, tearing their house down to the bare floors and studs.

"This is the fourth dumpster we filled," said Vince Hood, 60. "There was seven feet (213 cm) of water outside and five (152 cm) inside. Everything's lost."

Karen Hood, 55, said she was still amazed at how fast the water rose.

"We woke up and water was bubbling up from the floors," she said. "Then the whole room started filling with water, like in a James Bond movie where you're in a tank. I was like, 'Am I able to get out of here?'"

(Reporting by Rich McKay; Writing by Colleen Jenkins; Editing by Eric Walsh)

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