Mysterious toxic foam falls from the sky in this city

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Thick Foam Spills Onto Street in Bangalore, India


It looks like snow but it's not. A really strange phenomenon occurs regularly in the city of Bangalore, where the residents witness white foam taking over their streets. According to Geek, the toxic foam is produced by a nearby lake called Bellandur and it originates from human raw sewage and chemical waste that has accumulated in it over the years. The pollution makes the water in the lake highly contaminated, especially below the surface, but when it rains, the layer of toxicity forms this foam that gets carried all the way to the city.

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Mysterious toxic foam falls from the sky in this city
An Indian motorcyclist negotiates away from fluffy piles of foam at Varthur Kodi junction situated in east Bangalore on May 1, 2015. The innocuous-looking foam, which from a distance, looks like snow covering the road is nothing but toxic effluent caused by the polluted sewage water overflowing from nearby Varthur Lake. The foam is a result of the water in the lake having high content of ammonia and phosphate and very low dissolved oxygen. Sewage from many parts of the Bangalore is released into the lake, leaving it extremely polluted. The foam spilled onto Varthur Main Road, causing a traffic pile up recently besides spreading unbearable stench in the air for about three kilometre stretch near the Whitefield, which houses several IT companies at it Softare Technology Parks of India (STPI). AFP PHOTO/Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A canal which once carried water from Bellandur Lake to Varthur Lake is filled with froth emanating from sewage in east Bangalore on May 1, 2015. The innocuous-looking foam, which from a distance, looks like snow is nothing but toxic effluent caused by the polluted sewage water overflowing from nearby Bellandur Lake. The foam is a result of the water in the lake having high content of ammonia and phosphate and very low dissolved oxygen. Sewage from many parts of the Bangalore is released into lakes, leaving it extremely polluted. The foam during heavy rains spill onto the road, causing a traffic pile besides spreading unbearable stench in the air in the neighbourhood. AFP PHOTO/Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian pedestrians cover their noses as they cross a bridge over a frothing canal, which once carried water from Bellandur Lake to Varthur Lake, in east Bangalore on May 1, 2015. The innocuous-looking foam, which from a distance, looks like snow is nothing but toxic effluent caused by the polluted sewage water overflowing from nearby Bellandur Lake. The foam is a result of the water in the lake having high content of ammonia and phosphate and very low dissolved oxygen. Sewage from many parts of the Bangalore is released into lakes, leaving it extremely polluted. The foam during heavy rains spill onto the road, causing a traffic pile besides spreading unbearable stench in the air in the neighbourhood. AFP PHOTO/Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian motorcyclist negotiates away from fluffy piles of foam at Varthur Kodi junction in east Bangalore on May 1, 2015. The innocuous-looking foam, which from a distance, looks like snow covering the road is nothing but toxic effluent caused by the polluted sewage water overflowing from nearby Varthur Lake. The foam is a result of the water in the lake having high content of ammonia and phosphate and very low dissolved oxygen. Sewage from many parts of the Bangalore is released into the lake, leaving it extremely polluted. The foam spilled onto Varthur Main Road, causing a traffic pile up recently besides spreading unbearable stench in the air for about three kilometre stretch near the Whitefield, which houses several IT companies at it Softare Technology Parks of India (STPI). AFP PHOTO/Manjunath KIRAN (Photo credit should read MANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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The residents try to stay away from the accumulations of foam on the streets. While the consequences of getting in touch with the material are unknown, it is common sense that something that originates from such a toxic environment should not be touched. Locals have been complaining about the phenomenon for more than a decade, but the government has not taken steps towards cleaning the lake.

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