This beaver-like mammal survived events that killed dinosaurs

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This Beaver-Like Mammal Survived Events That Killed Dinosaurs

A new mammal was recently discovered by a university sophomore working a dig in New Mexico.

The somewhat beaver-like creature, whose existence dates back to the early Palaeocene era, had a strange and intricate set of "cheek teeth" and outlived the dinosaurs. It was also big: almost three-feet long—fairly substantial for the prehistoric time period, all things considered.

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Its distinctive dental features were optimized for chewing plants and leaves—and showcased both razor-sharp and multi-cusped characteristics. Researchers say the creature would have lived throughout present-day Asia and North America. And, though it did survive that allegedly-asteroid-induced mass extinction event, the possibly-proto-beaver wasn't long for this world itself.

The genus went extinct around 35 million years ago—pushed out of existence by the ancestors of modern-day rodents.

It's believed rodents may have forced the creature's demise because they were smarter or reproduced faster and in greater numbers.

Long since extinct, the newly-discovered creature is now helping humans tweak the history of the mammals.

See photos of newly discovered dinosaur that had curls:
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Newly discovered dinosaur species had curls
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This beaver-like mammal survived events that killed dinosaurs
(Photo via GeoBeats)
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