The latest: Death toll from rainstorm rises to 12

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South Carolina Floods Region's Worst in 1,000 Years

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) -- The latest on the rainstorm that is pounding parts of the East Coast (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

The coroner for the county surrounding Columbia has released the names of several people found dead in flooded vehicles, bringing the death toll from the storms to at least 12.

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Richland County Coroner Gary Watts said a 35-year-old woman was found dead early Monday and a 78-year-old man was found late Sunday night at separate locations near Gills Creek, the site of some of the worst flooding.

Watts said a 60-year-old man was found Monday morning near another creek east of there.

There have been at least 10 deaths in South Carolina since the storms started last week, while there have been two storm-related deaths in North Carolina.

See images from the South Carolina storms:

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The latest: Death toll from rainstorm rises to 12
A resident looks down Mayfield St. as the Ashley river floodwaters rise in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Residents are concerned that the Ashley river will continue to rise as floodwaters come down from Columbia. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Rankin Craig watches as friends and family remove belongings from her flooded home in Forest Acres in Columbia, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
DNR officer Brett Irvin and Lexington Co. Deputy Dan Rusinyak carry June Loch to dry land after she was rescued from her home in the Pine Glen subdivision off of Tram road on Oct. 5, 2015 in the St. Andrews area of Columbia, S.C. Residents are having to abandon their homes because of flooding coinciding with release of water from the dam. (Tim Dominick/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
Roberta Albers walks around her home after the floodwaters start to recede at French Quarter Creek in Huger, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. French Quarter Creek is prone to flooding, but all residents who have lived there for several decades say this is the worst it has ever been. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Bill Cahill sprays off his pool deck as discarded furniture and insulation pile up in his yard after the floodwaters receded at French Quarter Creek in Huger, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. French Quarter Creek is prone to flooding, but all residents who have lived there for several decades say this is the worst it has ever been. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Sean Nance walks through floodwaters carrying some work clothes as he evacuates from his apartment in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Residents are concerned that the Ashley River will continue to rise as floodwaters come down from Columbia. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Jeanni Adame rides in her boat as she checks on neighbors seeing if they want to evacuate in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., after many of their neighbors left, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. South Carolina is still struggling with flood waters due to a slow moving storm system. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Pedestrians walk down Dorchester Road at Sawmill Branch Canal as it begins to wash away due to floodwaters near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Residents are concerned that the Ashley river will continue to rise as floodwaters come down from Columbia. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Floodwaters close in on homes on a small piece of land on Lake Katherine in Columbia, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. After a week of steady rain, the showers tapered off Monday and an inundated South Carolina turned to surveying a road system shredded by historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Hunter Baker drives his boat down a flooded East Black Creek Road to his home following heavy rains in Florence, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Flooding continues throughout the state following record rainfall amounts over the last several days. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
A man makes his way through floodwaters in the parking lot of The Citadel Beach Club on Isle of Palms, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. The Charleston and surrounding areas are still struggling with flood waters due to a slow moving storm system. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
EASTOVER, SC - OCTOBER 6: Trey McMillian looks over the damage done by flood waters on a road in Eastover on October 6, 2015 in Eastover, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and continues to face resulting flooding. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Chris Rosselot, left, and Branch Tanksley, at right, both with the Charleston City Boat Yard, help Kerry Gonzalez evacuate from her home in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Residents are concerned that the Ashley river will continue to rise as floodwaters come down from Columbia. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Ethan Abbott pulls his boat down Mayfield St. to help a friend get personal items out of a flooded house in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Residents are concerned that the Ashley river will continue to rise as floodwaters come down from Columbia. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Overall aerial view shows historic Charleston at the Battery with minor flooding still visible in Charleston, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. The Charleston and surrounding areas are still struggling with flood waters due to a slow moving storm system. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Hunter Baker surveys flood damage to his neighborhood near the flooded Black Creek following heavy rains in Florence, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Flooding continues throughout the state following record rainfall amounts over the last several days. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
A kayaker makes her way through floodwaters on Sullivan's Island, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. The Charleston and surrounding areas are still struggling with floodwaters due to a slow moving storm system. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Pictured is the inside of the Pavlovich Balley School Building, home of the Columbia Classical Ballet, as electrical crews shut off power, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. (Gerry Melendez/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
A dog is cut off from it's home because of floodwaters in Florence, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Flooding continues throughout the state following record rainfall amounts over the last several days. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Rescue crews from across the country work to help those in need after rain and flood water ravaged the Columbia, S.C. area on Oct. 4, 2015. (Matt Walsh/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
A resident walks down a flooded Prince St. in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A woman walks down a flooded sidewalk toward an open convenience store in Charleston, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in South Carolina and ordered federal aid to bolster state and local efforts as flood warnings remained in effect for many parts of the East Coast through Sunday. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Neighbors watch employees with the city of Isle of Palms cut down a live oak tree that fell down on 23rd Avenue after heavy rains fell on Isle of Palms, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The South Carolina coast is getting hammered with heavy rains along with an unusual lunar high tide causing flooding all over the state. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A man paddles a kayak down a flooded street in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
David Linnen takes a yard rake to clear drains in front of Winyah Apartments in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. The apartment complex has been evacuated. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
George Myers with the city of Isle of Palms directs equipment in on 23rd Ave. to clear the road after heavy rains fell on the Isle of Palms, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The South Carolina coast is getting hammered with historic rains along with an unusual lunar high tide causing flooding all over the state. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
George Myers with the city of Isle of Palms cuts down a tree on 23rd Ave. to clear the road after heavy rains fell on the Isle of Palms, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The South Carolina coast is getting hammered with historic rains along with an unusual lunar high tide causing flooding all over the state. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A vehicle and a man try to navigate floodwaters in Florence, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, as heavy rain continues to cause widespread flooding in many areas of the state. The rainstorm drenching the East Coast brought more misery to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing scores of roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Tripp Adams, 8, walks through the flood waters near high tide in the historic downtown in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Jordan Bennett, of Rock Hill, S.C., paddles up to a flooded store in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
David Linnen takes a yard rake to clear drains in front of Winyah Apartments in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. The apartment complex has been evacuated. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A man watches as a vehicle tries to navigate flood waters in Florence, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015 as heavy rains continue to saturate the state, causing widespread flooding. The rainstorm drenching the East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing scores of roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Tameca Sheriff comforts her father, Napoleon Sheriff, as they wait out the flood waters in an American Red Cross Shelter in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Members of Norfolk Fire-Rescue pull a man from his car stranded because of flooding in Norfolk, Va., on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. (AP Photo/Jason Hirschfeld)
Capers the dog walks by a fallen live oak tree on 23rd Ave. on the Isle of Palms after heavy rains fell on the Isle of Palms, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The South Carolina coast is getting hammered with historic rains along with an unusual lunar high tide causing flooding all over the state. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
A man walks his dog through flood waters during high tide on the Isle of Palms, S.C., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. Rain pummeling parts of the East Coast showed little sign of slackening Saturday, with record-setting precipitation prolonging the soppy misery that has been eased only by news that powerful Hurricane Joaquin will not hit the U.S. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Will Cunningham, 14, rides his bike down Station 29 on Sullivan's Island, S.C., with his friend Patrick Kelly, 14, going the kayak route during flood waters on Sullivan's Island Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. Rain pummeling parts of the East Coast showed little sign of slackening Saturday, with record-setting precipitation prolonging the soppy misery that has been eased only by news that powerful Hurricane Joaquin will not hit the U.S. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
An American Red Cross van is stranded in floodwaters on U.S. Hwy. 17 North near Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Several sections of Highway 17 are shut down between Charleston and Georgetown. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Paul Banker, left, paddles a kayak and his wife Wink Banker, right, takes photos on a flooded street in Charleston, S.C., Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. A flash flood warning was in effect in parts of South Carolina, where authorities shut down the Charleston peninsula to motorists. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Firemen, from left to right, Norman Beauregard, Kevin Ettenger and Chris Rodgers with the Georgetown Fire Department, inspect the flood waters at high tide in the historic downtown in Georgetown, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Much of South Carolina has experienced historic rain totals coupled with an unusually high lunar tide causing wide spread flooding. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
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3:30 p.m.

Island roads are flooded, motorists are driving through waterlogged intersections and streets in downtown Charleston, and water surrounds upscale homes in a suburb west of the city.

Flying in a helicopter in a light drizzle, an AP reporter and photographer got a view of the aftermath of the storm Monday from hundreds of feet above the Charleston area. In one subdivision, homes were cut off as people walked through knee-high water and a man paddled through the water. Several streets had abandoned cars. Oil sheens reflected from the flood waters.

In the city's historic district, drivers left wakes behind their cars as they drove through standing water. Although most of the streets were clear, a television news crew had found one of the streets where there was still flooding as the background for a weathercaster.

On Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms northeast of Charleston, water covered streets nearest the beachfront and some homes were completely surrounded by high water. But the damage would likely be minimal because island homes are raised on pilings.

At Boone Hall Plantation in nearby Mount Pleasant, fields were covered with water and pumpkins scattered in one area, apparently floating away from where they had been stacked.

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2:45 p.m.

Two members of the South Carolina Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team based at McEntire Joint National Guard Base say they have rescued between 25 and 30 people over the last two days.

Chief Warrant Officer 3 Will Sirmon, says his team was able to maneuver rescue baskets down to many houses to pluck people from their porches. They would see people waiving towels and that's how they knew to go get some of them.

Henry Hickman, a firefighter from Myrtle Beach, said his most dangerous mission Sunday was plucking a man from a tree in moving water in Sumter County.

Hickman said the man appeared to have tried to drive through moving water and had abandoned his vehicle and was clinging to a tree in rising water.

He said the man had been there several hours but his team was able to access him by helicopter and turn him over to the local EMS workers.

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1:30 p.m.

Officials at the University of South Carolina are bringing in bottled water and portable restrooms to help take care of the 31,000 students who attend the school's main campus in the flooded capital city of Columbia.

The city has warned all residents to boil water before using it for drinking or cooking. University officials say bottled water was delivered Monday to several on-campus buildings, and students in campus housing were being encouraged to use stoves and microwaves and common areas to boil water themselves.

Portable restrooms have been delivered to residence halls, sorority and fraternity houses and the student union building.

Officials say classes will also be cancelled Tuesday. The campus is open, and officials say several dining areas and a counseling center are open for students' use.

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Members of the U.S. Geological Survey returned to one of the worst flooded sections of Columbia to replace a water gauge that had been swept away from a bridge over Gills Creek.

John Joiner, one of a team from Atlanta deployed to Columbia for the emergency, said the creek is at 9.5 feet, reaching to just under the bridge. Weather officials said the 16.6 inches that fell Sunday on the Gills Creek area was the rainiest day in one single spot in the U.S. in more than 16 years.

One truck lay beside the bridge and merchandise from a nearby department store were scattered about the streets. Shoes and other clothing drenched by the floods were captured in bushes, trees and other debris alongside the bridge.

John Blackmon, 30, who lives just 200 feet from Gills Creek, said the water rose up to a foot or two behind his home.

"It's into the basement area, looks like 2 to 3 feet deep, but I haven't gone down there to view the damage," Blackmon said.

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1:10 p.m.

A half-dozen fire trucks and pumps from cities in South Carolina have moved hundreds of thousands of gallons of water to a hospital in downtown Columbia.

Capt. Isaac Romey of the Columbia Fire Department said the crews from a variety of departments moved water from hydrants in a shuttle operation to Palmetto Health Baptist Hospital, which was without running water.

"The tankers pull the water out of the hydrants, move it into dump tanks and then pull it into the hospital," Romey said.

He said the operation began around 11 p.m. Sunday and was continuing Monday. The water is being used for uses other than drinking.

He said the operation had put at least 300,000 gallons into the system at that point, and he said it would go on as long as needed.

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12:35 p.m.

The 16.6 inches of rain that fell on the Gills Creek area near Columbia on Sunday was one of the rainiest days in the U.S. in the last 15 years.

That's according to weather stations with more than 50 years of record-keeping.

On Sunday, Gills Creek turned into a raging torrent of murky brown floodwater that swamped dozens of homes, apartments and businesses. The creek was 10 feet above flood stage, spilling floodwaters that almost reached the stoplights at a four-lane intersection.

The National Weather Service says 18 inches of rain fell in Panacea, Florida, in 2012 and 18.4 inches dropped on Houston in 2001.

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(This version corrects a previous story that said Gills Creek had the single rainiest day in the U.S. since 1999. Based on a more complete review, federal weather officials say Gills Creek had one of the rainiest days in the last 15 years, but it was not the rainiest.)

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12:25 p.m.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley says the rain is starting to back off after inundating the state, but she is still warning people that the danger is not over.

She says officials will be closely following a wave of floodwater Monday as it moves across the state toward the coast. More communities may have to be evacuated and more roads and bridges may need to be closed as the water runs downstream toward the coast.

More than 40,000 people are without water and water distribution sites are being set up. She says at least nine people have died in the state. Five of them drowned and four were killed in traffic-related accidents. More than 900 people are in shelters and about 26,000 people are still without power.

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10:45 a.m.

Authorities say a 56-year-old man who tried to drive his sedan through floodwaters in South Carolina has died, the ninth fatality since a slow-moving rainstorm began several days ago.

Kershaw County Coroner David West said McArthur Woods drowned after driving around a barricade Sunday night into standing water on a road in Lugoff, a community northeast of Columbia.

Someone called 911 around 10 p.m. after hearing a passenger in the car screaming. The 28-year-old woman managed to climb out through a window and get on top of the car. A firefighter with a tether waded into several feet of water and rescued her.

Woods wasn't able to make it out of the car, which was already submerged when the woman was saved.

West said the woman was taken to the hospital and doesn't appear to have life-threatening injuries.

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10:30

Attorney General Alan Wilson is warning South Carolinians that a law against price gouging is under effect in the wake of torrential rains and flooding across the state.

The top prosecutor issued a news release Monday saying the law went into effect when Gov. Nikki Haley issued a state of emergency for the state.

Wilson urges people to notify his office if they see gouging happening for prices of commodities including food, gasoline, lodging and water.

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8:15 a.m.

Floodwaters are starting to recede in Charleston, one of the areas hardest hit as days of torrential rain gripped South Carolina.

But public schools and government offices in Charleston remained closed Monday. City officials say about 30 streets and intersections are still closed because of standing water. Others roads in outlying areas closed as well.

By morning, though, the rain had stopped in Charleston. Officials say some flooding should recede with the midmorning low tide. The high tide Monday afternoon is not predicted to be nearly as high as those of the weekend.

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8:15 a.m.

The flooding across South Carolina has forced desperate rescues for some, and discomfort and unexpected expense for nearly everyone.

Pastor Robert Hunter went to church Sunday morning and couldn't return afterward to his home in the Florence County town of Pamplico.

Early Monday, from a hotel off Interstate 95 about 15 miles from his home, the 63-year-old Hunter said: "I got about less than a mile from my home, and the water there had broken across the road. The road was impassable, and all the other little roads around were impassible."

He was trying to return home after leading Sunday services. He says he crossed bridges with water already up to the point that it was rushing across the span's pavement. After trying alternates, he gave up and checked into the hotel about an hour before it filled up.

He says his wife was OK at their home on a small rise more than a mile from the Pee Dee River.

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8:05 a.m.

Gov. Nikki Haley says South Carolina is facing rain and flooding the likes of which haven't been seen in 1,000 years, with 2 feet of rain reported in some areas.

Haley told NBC's Today show on Monday morning, "Our obvious priority is safety."

Haley says six people have died in her state. Another died in North Carolina.

The governor also says: 381 roads are closed, with 127 bridges down. More than two dozen shelters are open. Over 1,000 law enforcement personnel and 1,000 transportation department workers are working. Utility crews are working to restore service to 30,000 customers.

Haley says most people are heeding her plea to stay off the roads.

She says: "I think they get it. All you have to do is look out the window and see the flooding. It doesn't take long for you to get in your car and realize you've got to turn back around."

Haley plans another update at an 11:30 a.m. news conference. She warns that the worst isn't over yet, as rain is still falling.

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7:25 a.m.

Record rainfall totals have been recorded in South Carolina's capital city as part of historic flooding that has deluged the area.

The National Weather Service says Sunday was the wettest day in the history of Columbia. The rainfall total at the Columbia Metropolitan Airport was 6.87 inches, the most rain that's ever fallen there in one day.

Forecasters say the old record of 5.79 inches was set July 9, 1959.

The two-day rainfall total for Saturday and Sunday was 10.44 inches. That breaks the old record of 7.69 inches set over August 16 and 17, 1949.

Since Friday, more than 20 inches of rain has fallen in some parts of Columbia. The Weather Service says Gills Creek, an area that has seen neighborhoods and thoroughfares under water, had recorded 20.28 inches as of early Monday morning.

The storm stretched beyond South Carolina - in Georgia, more than 14,000 customers were still without power early Monday. That's down from 33,000 at the height of outages in the state. Many of the outages were in hard-hit Habersham County, where schools are closed Monday. Rain and high winds that toppled trees caused the outages.

In Maryland, 14 people were rescued by boat after the Patuxent River flooded a mobile home park.

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6:50 a.m.

Authorities have released information about a South Carolina Department of Transportation worker killed in the aftermath of torrential rains and historic flooding in the state.

The agency says in a news release that 45-year-old Timothy Wayne Gibson died in flood waters Sunday while overseeing work near downtown Columbia.

DOT says Gibson was working on Garners Ferry Road, a major thoroughfare into the capital city that has seen feet of water pooling in residential and commercial areas.

Transportation officials say Gibson was with the agency's Richland Maintenance Unit and was traveling in a truck that was caught in rushing waters, overturned and was swept away. An autopsy is scheduled Monday.

So far, at least seven deaths have been blamed on the vast storm that has forced hundreds from their homes, canceled schools and prompted rescues of stranded citizens by water and air.

6 a.m.

Thousands of South Carolina residents are waking up to homes without electricity after historic flooding throughout the state.

An online coverage map showed that power was out early Monday morning for more than 13,500 South Carolina Electric & Gas customers. Nearly 12,000 of those outages were in Richland and Lexington counties, where flood waters have been abundant in many neighborhoods and commercial areas.

Duke Energy said that about 7,800 of its customers had no electricity, primarily in the northwestern corner of South Carolina.

As of late Sunday afternoon, officials said more than 6,000 electric cooperative customers were without power, most of those also in the central and northwestern parts of the South Carolina.

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5:50 a.m.

A mother and her infant affected by historic South Carolina flooding have been rescued from their roof top via helicopter.

The U.S. Coast Guard said in a news release that a crew plucked Cristi Mueller and her 15-month-old daughter Kailynn Walts from the roof of their home in Huger in Berkeley County.

Crews got reports at around 6:20 a.m. Sunday that the family was stranded due to severe flooding in the neighborhood.

A crew aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Savannah, Georgia, was launched to rescue the two. Mueller and her daughter were taken to Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport. Officials say the woman and her child were not hurt.

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4:45 a.m.

Days of torrential rains kept much of South Carolina and its capital gripped by floodwaters early Monday as emergency responders promised renewed door-to-door searches for anyone still trapped after a weekend deluge and hundreds of rescues.

At least seven weather-related deaths have been blamed on the rainstorm that has lingered for days and been linked to an unusually deep low pressure system. The storm dumped so much rain on South Carolina and parts of surrounding states that even veteran weather experts called it unprecedented.

Police in Columbia, the capital city, said searchers would go door-to-door in the hardest-hit areas later Monday for any still seeking safety. And it could take weeks or longer to ensure the safety of numerous roads, highways and bridges rendered impassible by a historic rainstorm that pummeled South Carolina.

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10:45 p.m.

Police in the flooded South Carolina capital of Columbia say they and other emergency crews will continue with "concentrated search and rescue operations" early Monday.

Columbia Police Chief William Holbrook issued a statement saying the operations would check for any people in the city and nearby Richland County still needing evacuation from flooded areas.

He urged anyone still needing to get to safety to call 911.

"The operation will also include overall welfare checks," he said, adding crews will mark the front doors of homes checked with a fluorescent orange X once searched.

Anyone found is to be taken out on military vehicles to safety, he added.

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