Californians say undocumented immigrants should get to stay: poll

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A strong majority of Californians say immigrants benefit their state and that those who came to the United States illegally should be allowed to remain to live and work, a poll published on Wednesday shows.

About three-quarters of those interviewed for the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) poll, including a majority of Republicans, said undocumented immigrants should be allowed to stay if they meet certain conditions.

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The findings come as some candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination take strong anti-illegal immigration policy stances, including a call by front-runner Donald Trump to deport the estimated 11 million people living in the United States illegally.

"I asked the question because of all the chatter on immigration this summer," said PPIC President Mark Baldassare. "What I found was Californians, much more than the nation as a whole, say that we need to find a way for undocumented immigrants who live and work here to stay here."

See photos of California's stance on immigrants:

17 PHOTOS
Immigration in California
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Californians say undocumented immigrants should get to stay: poll
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Anti-immigration activists protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Anti-immigration activist Sabina Durden (R) and immigration sympathizer Mary Estrada (L) debate during a protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
Bikramjit Singh, 9, center, and his sister Parneet Kaur, 11, immigrants from India, joined more than a dozen other young people who took an oath of citizenship,Thursday, July 2, 2015, in Sacramento, Calif. The children, aged 6-17, each have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen and became U.S. citizens after their parents were naturalized. They were presented certificates of citizenship as part of Independence Day celebrations. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Irma Castillo, outreach coordinator with United Farm Workers Foundation, left, gives Erica Montoya, 32, right, paperwork during an immigration workshop in Hanford, California, U.S., on Thursday, March 19, 2015. President Barack Obama announced Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in November as a response to Congress' unwillingness to update a policy that both parties agree is flawed. Recipients would enter the formal economy with work permits and Social Security numbers, creating a legal workforce for businesses, greater security for themselves and revenue for government coffers. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Juan Barbosa, 23, of Bakersfield, looks at a confirmation of petition acceptance for his application to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) employment authorization renewal at the United Farm Workers Foundation offices in Bakersfield, California, U.S., on Thursday, March 19, 2015. President Barack Obama announced his DACA program in November as a response to Congress' unwillingness to update a policy that both parties agree is flawed. Recipients would enter the formal economy with work permits and Social Security numbers, creating a legal workforce for businesses, greater security for themselves and revenue for government coffers. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
EL MONTE, CALIFORNIA , DECEMBER 10, 2014: Letisia Huertado (left) helps Destiny Valle (middle) and Ashley Vargas (right) construct sentences in their first grade class at Parkview School, on December 10, 2014 in El Monte. State education officials are preparing to issue the first report documenting the number of students who have continued to struggle with substandard English for more than 7 years, even though most of them were born in the United States. But some schools have developed effective programs to prevent young children born to immigrant families from becoming so-called long-term English learners. (Photo by Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA OCTOBER 3, 2014 -- Josephine Lopez, 84, from Perris Ca, joins immigrant-rights supporters celebrating the passage of AB 60, which will allow undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses starting in January 2015 on Friday October 3, 2014. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
GRANADA HILLS, CA - JANUARY 2, 2015: Immigrants without legal status line up to apply for California driver licenses at DMV offices January 2, 2015 in Granada Hills. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
GRANADA HILLS, CA - JANUARY 2, 2015: Immigrants without legal status line up to apply for California driver licenses at DMV offices January 2, 2015 in Granada Hills. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Children of poor migrant families receive backpacks filled with school supplies before the start of the new school year during a charity event at the Los Angeles Mission's 'skid row' headquarters on August 9, 2014. US conservatives recently commented on the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's 'war on poverty' to dispute the effectiveness of existing policies, and urge a welfare state overhaul. Five decades and trillions of dollars after President Johnson waged his war on poverty they said a staggering 49 million Americans are still living below the poverty line AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
MURRIETA, CA - JULY 7: Immigrant rights activist Mary Estrada (R) speaks with anti-immigration activists during a protest outside of the U.S. Border Patrol Murrieta Station on July 7, 2014 in Murrieta, California. Immigration protesters have staged rallies in front of the station for about a week in response to a wave of undocumented immigrant children caught along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas and transported to the Murrieta facility while awaiting deportation proceedings. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA OCTOBER 3, 2014 -- Axel Paredes, 40, an immigrant (undocumented) worker who has been in the US for 10 years celebrates with supporters the passage of AB 60, which will allow undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses starting in January 2015 outside city hall Friday, October 3, 2014.. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Children hold banners and placards while listening to speakers at a rally outside the 9th Circuit federal court in Pasadena, California on July 16, 2015, where Immigrant rights organizations, labor, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients from Arizona and Los Angeles gathered. After a multiple-year legal battle, the state of Arizona's embattled efforts to deny driver's licenses to immigrants who have been granted DACA under a federal program will face what could be yet another blow to Arizona when the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit hears oral arguments this Thursday in a lawsuit brought by civil rights groups challenging the discriminatory policy. AFP PHOTO/ FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA FEB. 17, 2015: Immigration reform supporters listen to speakers talk about expanded federal immigration programs that will allow millions of immigrants to stay in the country and receive work permits for three years at Los Angeles City Hall Monday, Feb. 17, 2015. Los Angeles City Councilman Gil Cedillo joined Rep. Judy Chu and others to talk about expanded federal immigration programs that will allow millions of immigrants to stay in the country and receive work permits for three years. One of the programs, which applies to people who arrived in the country as children under the age of 16, will be expanded on Wednesday. (Photo by Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Immigrant Jose Montes attends an event on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, DACA and Deferred Action for Parental Accountability, DAPA, part of the immigration relief program, downtown Los Angeles Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. The White House promised an appeal Tuesday after a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration and gave a coalition of 26 states time to pursue a lawsuit aiming to permanently stop the orders. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Public officials and immigration reform advocates rally outside the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors headquarters after announcing the launching of the statewide campaign Ready California Tuesday, May 19, 2015. The effort aims to prepare immigrants about the immigration relief plans offered under alliesPresident Barack Obamaâs executive actions. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
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At the national level, a majority also believe undocumented immigrants should be able to stay, Baldassare said, citing a July ABC News/Washington Post poll that shows 60 percent favor a path to legal status.

Those numbers are considerably higher in California, however, where 83 percent of Democrats, 53 percent of Republicans and 70 percent of independents said undocumented immigrants should be able to stay if they pay a fine and meet other requirements, for a total of 75 percent of all adults interviewed.

Support was also strong across ethnic lines, with 76 percent of Asians, 68 percent of blacks, 92 percent of Latinos and 63 percent of whites in favor of a path to legal status.

Those opposed to such a policy included 15 percent of Democrats, 43 percent of Republicans and 26 percent of independents.

In California, 43 percent of voters are registered as Democrats, 28 percent as Republicans and 24 percent as having no party preference. Democrats hold all statewide elected offices and large majorities in both houses of the legislature.

In other matters, a slim majority of Californians told pollsters they favored extending temporary tax increases credited with easing a budget crisis in 2013. The poll also showed that state residents continue to see ongoing drought and the possibility of water shortages as a pressing issue, but fewer blame their neighbors for not doing enough to conserve.

Related: See immigrants becoming U.S. citizens

13 PHOTOS
Immigrants becoming citizens in America
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Californians say undocumented immigrants should get to stay: poll
Immigrants from 25 countries take the oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony in Daley Plaza on September 16, 2014 in Chicago, Illinipois. Seventy people were awarded their U.S. citizenship at the Citizenship Day ceremony. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Immigrants take oath of citizenship to the United States on November 20, 2014 in Newark, New Jersey. Sixty immigrants from 25 countries became American citizens during the naturalization ceremony at the U.S. Immigration and Citizenship Services (USCIS) office at Newark's Federal Building. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
New American citizens celebrate at a naturalization ceremony on November 20, 2014 in Newark, New Jersey. Sixty immigrants from 25 countries became American citizens during the ceremony at the U.S. Immigration and Citizenship Services (USCIS), office at Newark's Federal Building. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
New U.S. citizens, including Nicole Annete Flood from Mexico (C), attend a naturalization ceremony at Liberty State Park on September 19, 2014 in Jersey City, New Jersey. Forty immigrants from 18 different countries became American citizens at the event, held by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), on Constitution and Citizenship Day. This week USCIS will have naturalized more than 27,000 new citizens at 160 ceremonies nationwide. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A new U.S. citizen holds an American flag at a naturalization ceremony at the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site in Indianapolis, Thursday, July 3, 2014. Judge Sarah Evans Barker naturalized 101 new citizens at the ceremony. The ceremony was part of an annual celebration of Independence Day by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
Ricky Checo, center, of the Dominican Republic, takes the oath of allegiance along with other immigrants during a citizenship ceremony at Liberty State Park, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, in Jersey City, N.J. Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is celebrated each year on Sept. 17, on the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution in 1787. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is expected to welcome more than 36,000 new citizens during more than 200 naturalization ceremonies across the country from Sept. 17-23. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
New citizens wave American flags during a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony on the campus of Florida International University, Monday, July 6, 2015, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
U.S. citizen Jimmy Dial puts his U.S. Navy cap on his 3-year-old daughter Kimberly Dial as fellow citizen and U.S. Army soldier Henri Blandon holds his 4-year-old daughter Karin Blandon as the men's wives and girls' mothers become U.S. citizens at a naturalization ceremony featuring remarks by U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson in Ontario, Calif., Friday, Nov. 14, 2014. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Yassin Elalamy, of Egypt, from left, Ezra Dessie, of Ethiopia, and Hilary Suarez, of the Dominican Republic, recite the pledge of allegiance during a Halloween-themed naturalization ceremony, Friday, Oct. 31, 2014, in Baltimore. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services welcomed 38 children, many of whom came dressed in Halloween costumes, from 18 countries. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
New United States citizens recite the Oath of Allegiance while participating in a naturalization ceremony, Wednesday, July 9, 2014 in New York. Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas administered the Oath of Allegiance to 75 citizenship candidates at the 85th Annual League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) Convention. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Sarah Contis, 5, holds up an American flag while accompanying her father, Alex Contis, right, of Romania, as he becomes a U.S. citizen during a naturalization ceremony for more than 1,000 citizenship candidates at Turner Field, home of the Atlanta Braves baseball team, Wednesday, July 2, 2014, in Atlanta. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services welcomed 1,094 new citizens from 81 countries as part of their annual Independence Day celebration marking the nationâs 238th birthday this year. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Eduardo Simental, right, of Mexico, raises his hand as he recites the Oath of Allegiance at a Naturalization Ceremony in Oklahoma City, Friday, June 27, 2014. Fifty-one individuals from 24 countries took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States as their final step to become citizens. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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