Hurricane Joaquin becomes the third Hurricane of the Atlantic season; hurricane warnings, watches issued for Bahamas

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Joaquin Becomes A Hurricane

By Weather.com

Hurricane Joaquin became the 2015 Atlantic season's third hurricane Wednesday morning, and hurricane watches and warnings have been issued for the Bahamas while we nervously eye its potential to affect the U.S. East Coast.

READ MORE: Clerk jailed over gay marriage says pope encouraged her

An Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance aircraft measured sufficiently strong flight-level winds and low surface pressure to prompt the National Hurricane Center to upgrade Joaquin Wednesday morning. The Hurricane Hunters found a 55-mile-wide eye, but it was open on its north side -- meaning that robust thunderstorms had not fully encircled the Joaquin's center of circulation.

Hurricane Joaquin continues to intensify slowly, as wind shear -- harmful to the intensification of tropical cyclones -- lessens, and a complicated atmospheric pattern makes its future track - including any potential landfall on the U.S. East Coast -- extremely difficult to forecast.

Residents along the East Coast of the U.S. should pay close attention to the forecast now through this weekend. It's a particularly difficult forecast that hinges on the behavior of several different atmospheric features over North America and the North Atlantic Ocean.

Computer forecast models – and the meteorologists who rely on them for guidance – are grappling with a complex interaction between Joaquin, a cold front near the East Coast, the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida, a strong bubble of high pressure aloft over the North Atlantic Ocean, and a potentially strong area of low pressure aloft digging into the southeastern U.S. later this week.

Joaquin's future depends critically on the position and relative strength of those players – not to mention its own strength. Strong wind shear had kept most of Joaquin's thunderstorm activity (convection) south or east of its center of circulation, but that changed Tuesday afternoon and evening as thunderstorms developed closer to its circulation center.

MORE: Expert Analysis | Hurricane Central

Because Joaquin is strengthening and drifting ever closer to the Bahamas, the government of that country has issued a hurricane warning for many of its central islands, and hurricane watches for several others. Specifically:

  • A hurricane warning is in effect for Cat Island, the Exumas, Long Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador.
  • A hurricane watch is in effect for the northwestern Bahamas including the Abacos, Berry Islands, Bimini, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama Island, and New Providence, but excluding Andros Island.

Joaquin is expected to slowly churn toward the Bahamas Wednesday and Thursday. The extent of the effects on those islands will depend heavily on how close it gets and how much time it spends nearby before making the anticipated northward turn.

At this time, we expect some of the worst impacts in the Bahamas to occur on San Salvador and Rum Cay, the islands closest to Joaquin's current position. On San Salvador, rainfall totals could exceed 2 feet. Sustained tropical-storm force winds of 39 mph or greater may develop Wednesday night and continue unabated for 48 hours or more.

Track Forecast: Still Extremely Challenging

Although computer model simulations have had the advantage of ingesting high-resolution real-world data from the Air Force reconnaissance flight earlier in the day, it doesn't seem to have brought them any closer to a consensus.

The American GFS model forecast continues to show Joaquin making an alarming northwestward turn, slamming it right into Virginia, Maryland or North Carolina this weekend. Meanwhile, the European ECMWF model suggests Joaquin has a chance of staying away from the U.S. East Coast.

It is simply too soon and the uncertainty is too high to determine any impacts from Joaquin itself for the U.S. East Coast at this time.

The National Hurricane Center's official forecast cone is below. The official forecast remains a compromise between the competing scenarios from the computer models.

MAP: Track Hurricane Joaquin with our New Interactive Storm Tracker

Note that the official intensity forecast now brings Joaquin to Category 3 strength on Saturday morning, which by definition would make it a major hurricane.

Regardless of the ultimate outcome of Joaquin's path, portions of the East Coast will still see multiple impacts from the evolving large-scale weather pattern, including flooding rainfall, gusty winds, high surf, beach erosion and some coastal flooding. Click the link below for more information on that story.

MORE: Significant Impacts Likely on East Coast

In summary, here's what we know about Joaquin as of Wednesday's 2 p.m. EDT advisory:

  • Tropical Storm Joaquin's center is located about 190 miles east-northeast of the central Bahamas.
  • Maximum sustained winds are estimated at 85 mph, a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.
  • As wind shear over the storm lessens, Joaquin should strengthen further the next 2 to 3 days.
  • This system is moving slowly to the southwest and this is expected to continue through Thursday before turning north Friday into Saturday.
  • Hurricane watches and warnings are in effect for parts of the Bahamas. Nassau and Freeport are under a hurricane watch.
  • Joaquin may directly or indirectly affect the East Coast late this weekend or early next week, and a landfall is possible.
  • Moisture and/or energy associated with Joaquin could enhance rainfall along the cold front in the Northeast late this week. Regardless, the East Coast will see significant impacts from the larger scale weather pattern taking shape.

Check out pics from the strengthening storm:

17 PHOTOS
Hurricane Joaquin
See Gallery
Hurricane Joaquin becomes the third Hurricane of the Atlantic season; hurricane warnings, watches issued for Bahamas

NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly captured this photo on Oct. 2, 2015, from the International Space Station and wrote on Twitter, "Early morning shot of Hurricane #‎Joaquin‬ from @space_station before reaching ‪#‎Bahamas‬. Hope all is safe. #‎YearInSpace‬." (Photo via NASA)

IN SPACE - OCTOBER 1: In this handout from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Joaquin is seen churning in the Atlantic on October 1, 2015. Joaquin was upgraded to a category three hurricane early on October 1. The exact track has yet to be determined, but there is a possibity of landfall in the U.S. anywhere from North Carolina to the Northeast. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)
Major Hurricane Joaquin as seen by GOES East at 1900Z on October 1, 2015. (Photo via NOAA)
Craig Fugate, Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), talks about the status of Hurricane Joaquin as it moves through the eastern Bahamas, at the National Hurricane Center, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, in Miami. Forecasters were still gathering data to determine how it might affect the U.S. East Coast. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Map shows Hurricane Joaquinââ¬â¢s projected path; 2c x 5 1/2 inches; 96.3 mm x 139 mm;
Joaquin's winds have increased to hurricane strength making the storm the third hurricane of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season. This image was taken by GOES East at 1315Z on September 30, 2015. (Photo via NOAA)
This NOAA satellite image taken Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015 at 12:45 AM EDT shows Tropical Storm Joaquin moving into the Bahama Islands with maximum sustained winds of seventy miles per hour. This system is expected to quickly become a hurricane as it progresses further towards the eastern seaboard of the United States. A large precipitation shield is also covering New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Ohio River Valley. This activity is associated with a frontal boundary that extends from Newfoundland and Labrador into the Southern Plains. (Weather Underground via AP)
This image shows Tropical Storm Joaquin in the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 30, 2015. (Photo via NOAA)
This image shows Tropical Storm Joaquin in the Atlantic Ocean north of Hispaniola, taken by GOES East at 1415Z on September 29, 2015. (Photo via NOAA)
Tropical Storm Joaquin on Sept. 29, 2015. (Photo via NOAA)
Tropical Storm #Joaquin =Max sustained winds 70 mph. Should become hurricane. Track still uncertain beyond Friday. http://t.co/MxTpVLrHXG
BREAKING: #Hurricane warning issued for central Bahamas. Hurricane watch issued including Nassau, Freeport. #Joaquin http://t.co/8pAQ9iQvxP
#Joaquin is still a #tropicalstorm for now. You can track the latest here --> http://t.co/CWPOQvTLcT @CNN http://t.co/le9bxXlyh1
Tropical Storm #Joaquin likely to become a hurricane today. Stays near Bahamas thru Friday, then heads north #nlwx http://t.co/VluYOAv88v
Tropical Storm Joaquin continues to strengthen. Forecast to become a hurricane today @foxandfriends @FoxFriendsFirst http://t.co/8qNEuurFDt
The track and intensity continue to be fine tuned, but details are still unclear on Joaquin's impacts. #PAWX #FOX43 http://t.co/YuofedVmzu
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

It's a particularly difficult forecast that hinges on the behavior of several different atmospheric features over North America and the North Atlantic Ocean.

Computer forecast models – and the meteorologists who rely on them for guidance – are grappling with a complex interaction between Joaquin, a cold front near the East Coast, the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida, a strong bubble of high pressure aloft over the North Atlantic Ocean, and a potentially strong area of low pressure aloft digging into the southeastern U.S. later this week.

Joaquin's future depends critically on the position and relative strength of those players – not to mention its own strength. Strong wind shear had kept most of Joaquin's thunderstorm activity (convection) south or east of its center of circulation, but that changed Tuesday afternoon and evening as thunderstorms developed closer to its circulation center.

Because Joaquin is strengthening and drifting ever closer to the Bahamas, the government of that country has issued a hurricane warning and watch for most of its islands.

Joaquin is expected to slowly churn toward the Bahamas Wednesday and Thursday. The extent of the effects on those islands will depend heavily on how close it gets and how much time it spends nearby before making the anticipated northward turn.

Although computer model simulations run Tuesday evening had the advantage of ingesting high-resolution real-world data from the Air Force reconnaissance flight earlier in the day, it doesn't seem to have brought them any closer to a consensus.

The American GFS model forecast showed Joaquin making an alarming northwestward turn, slamming it right into Virginia and Maryland this weekend. Meanwhile, the European ECMWF model showed Joaquin staying well away from the U.S. East Coast, and eventually curving out into the North Atlantic well off the coasts of New England and Atlantic Canada.

It is simply too soon and the uncertainty is too high to determine any impacts from Joaquin itself for the U.S. East Coast at this time.

The National Hurricane Center's official forecast cone is below.

Regardless of the ultimate outcome of Joaquin's path, portions of the East Coast will still see multiple impacts from the evolving large-scale weather pattern, including flooding rainfall, gusty winds, high surf, beach erosion and some coastal flooding. Click the link below for more information on that story.

In summary, here's what we know about Joaquin:

  • Tropical Storm Joaquin's center was located about 245 miles east-northeast of the central Bahamas.
  • Maximum sustained winds were pegged at 75 mph, a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.
  • As wind shear over the storm lessens, Joaquin should strengthen further the next 2-3 days.
  • This system is moving slowly to the west-southwest and this is expected to continue through Thursday before turning north Friday into Saturday.
  • A hurricane warning is in effect for the central Bahamas.
  • A hurricane watch is in effect for the northwest Bahamas, except Andros Island. This includes Nassau and Freeport.
  • Joaquin may directly or indirectly affect the East Coast late this weekend or early next week, and a landfall cannot be ruled out.
  • Moisture and/or energy associated with Joaquin could enhance rainfall along the cold front in the Northeast late this week. Regardless, the East Coast will see significant impacts from the larger scale weather pattern taking shape.

RELATED GALLERY: See pictures of Hurricane Jeanne:

54 PHOTOS
Hurricane Jeanne
See Gallery
Hurricane Joaquin becomes the third Hurricane of the Atlantic season; hurricane warnings, watches issued for Bahamas
GONAIVES, HAITI: A Haitian man rings the water out of a jacket he had just washed as he stands in front of a destroyed house, in the north-eastern town of Gonaives, Haiti 24 September 2004 some six days after floods inundated the city and its surroundings. While rescuers in northern Haiti found more bodies, authorities said the official death toll had risen to 1,160, with another 1,250 missing, most of them feared dead. Thousands of homes were destroyed and about a quarter of a million people are estimated to have been affected by the September 18 flooding spawned by Jeanne, which was then a tropical storm but has now strengthened into a hurricane that threatens Florida.AFP PHOTO Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
Haitians struggle to get their hands on food handouts given in the back of an aid truck in the north-eastern town of Gonaives, Haiti 24 September 2004 some six days after floods inundated the city and its surroundings. While rescuers in northern Haiti found more bodies, authorities said the official death toll had risen to 1,160, with another 1,250 missing, most of them feared dead. Thousands of homes were destroyed and about a quarter of a million people are estimated to have been affected by the September 18 flooding spawned by Jeanne, which was then a tropical storm but has now strengthened into a hurricane that threatens Florida. AFP PHOTO Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read THONY BELIZAIRE/AFP/Getty Images)
A driver from the UN World Food Program truck stands on the roof of the cabin of his truck in the middle of a flooded road near the north-eastern town of Gonaives, Haiti 24 September 2004, some six days after floods inundated the city and its surroundings. The convoy was heading south when they encountered a traffic jam. T While rescuers in northern Haiti found more bodies, authorities said the official death toll had risen to 1,160, with another 1,250 missing, most of them feared dead. Thousands of homes were destroyed and about a quarter of a million people are estimated to have been affected by the September 18 flooding spawned by Jeanne, which was then a tropical storm but has now strengthened into a hurricane that threatens Florida. AFP PHOTO Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
A bus filled with Haitian people makes its way south in a flooded road near the north-eastern town of Gonaives, Haiti 24 September 2004, some six days after floods inundated the city and its surroundings. While rescuers in northern Haiti found more bodies, authorities said the official death toll had risen to 1,160, with another 1,250 missing, most of them feared dead. Thousands of homes were destroyed and about a quarter of a million people are estimated to have been affected by the September 18 flooding spawned by Jeanne, which was then a tropical storm but has now strengthened into a hurricane that threatens Florida. AFP PHOTO Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
A Haitian woman covers her nose as she walks by the body of a flood victim in the north-eastern town of Gonaives, Haiti 24 September 2004 some six days after floods inundated the city and its surroundings. The floods were caused by heavy rains after tropical storm Jeanne swept through the northern region of the country. While rescuers in northern Haiti found more bodies, authorities said the official death toll had risen to 1,160, with another 1,250 missing, most of them feared dead. Thousands of homes were destroyed and about a quarter of a million people are estimated to have been affected by the September 18 flooding spawned by Jeanne, which was then a tropical storm but has now strengthened into a hurricane that threatens Florida. AFP PHOTO Roberto Schmidt (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
BOYNTON BEACH, UNITED STATES: Cars drive north on Interstate highway 95 after the first bands of Hurricane Jeanne come ashore 25 September, 2004, in Boynton Beach, Florida. Residents along Florida's east coast braced themselves yet again as strengthening Jeanne threatened to be the fourth major storm to hit the state in six weeks. A million people have been ordered to evacuate as the storm approached the northwestern Bahamas with winds of 185kph (115 mph), threatening to batter areas still recovering from Hurricane Frances earlier this month with heavy rain, floods and damaging waves. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WEST PALM BEACH, UNITED STATES: Palm Beach County sheriffs patrol on the beach after a mandatory evacuation order was issued as the first bands of Hurricane Jeanne come ashore 25 September 2004, in West Palm Beach, Florida. Residents along Florida's east coast braced themselves yet again as strengthening Jeanne threatened to be the fourth major storm to hit the state in six weeks. A million people have been ordered to evacuate as the storm approached the northwestern Bahamas with winds of 185kph (115 mph), threatening to batter areas still recovering from Hurricane Frances earlier this month with heavy rain, floods and damaging waves. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
JUPITER, UNITED STATES: Waves slam over a seawall on the beach in Jupiter, Florida, as the first bands of Hurricane Jeanne come ashore 25 September, 2004. Residents along Florida's east coast braced themselves yet again as strengthening Jeanne threatened to be the fourth major storm to hit the state in six weeks. A million people have been ordered to evacuate as the storm approached the northwestern Bahamas with winds of 185kph (115 mph), threatening to batter areas still recovering from Hurricane Frances earlier this month with heavy rain, floods and damaging waves. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
JUPITER, UNITED STATES: Michael Peritz, 12, comes off the beach in Jupiter, Florida, as the first bands of Hurricane Jeanne come ashore 25 September, 2004. Residents along Florida's east coast braced themselves yet again as strengthening Jeanne threatened to be the fourth major storm to hit the state in six weeks. A million people have been ordered to evacuate as the storm approached the northwestern Bahamas with winds of 185kph (115 mph), threatening to batter areas still recovering from Hurricane Frances earlier this month with heavy rain, floods and damaging waves. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
FT. PIERCE, UNITED STATES: Dennis Price(R) cleans up part of a dock that was washed away in Ft. Pierce, Florida as a result of Hurricane Jeanne 26 September, 2004. Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
FT. PIERCE, UNITED STATES: Huge waves caused by Hurricane Jeanne batter a sea wall in front of a water front home on the inter costal waterway in Ft. Pierce, Florida 26 September, 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO/ Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
FT. PIERCE, UNITED STATES: Debris left by Hurricane Jeanne litters the yard of a water front home on the inter costal waterway in Ft. Pierce, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO /Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
FT. PIERCE, UNITED STATES: A message on a boarded up house in preparation for Hurricane Jeanne shows a bit of a sense of humor in Ft. Pierce, Florida 26 September, 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO/ Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: Debris from a mobile home destroyed by Hurricane Jeannee is scattered about the Lakewood Villas community in Vero Beach, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Mary Young looks at the damage to her father-in-law's home after the trailer was blown apart by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: Debris from a mobile home park damaged by Hurricane Jeannee is scattered about the Lakewood Villas community in Vero Beach, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: Debris from a mobile home destroyed by Hurricane Jeanne is seen in the Lakewood Villas mobile home community in Vero Beach, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: A sailboat rests on the shore after it was blown onto land by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: A television and furniture lie on the ground after a trailer home was blown apart by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: Debris from mobile homes damaged by Hurricane Jeanne is strewn about in Vero Beach, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: An semi tractor-trailer rests on its side after overturning in the high winds from Hurricane Jeanne on Interstate 95 near Ft, Pierce, Florida 26 September 2004. Hurricane Jeanne battered southeastern Florida for hours Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: A guest of Penwood Lodge walks through the debris after the hotel he was staying in was damaged by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Jeremy Bailey surveys what used to be the office of Penwood Lodge after the hotel he was staying in was damaged by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Bailey stated that he was staying at the hotel because he is a roofing contractor helping put homes together after hurricane Frances. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Chris Martin (L) and Zigmund York walk through a flooded street caused by passing Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Vero Beach, Florida. Hurricane Jeanne continues to move away from the area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Constance Kenney surveys what is left of her father's bedroom after the home was blown apart by winds caused by Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Jeanne, which has been downgraded to a tropical storm, moved across the state of Florida after making landfall the night before. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, UNITED STATES: Mike 'Dusty' Rhoades(R) looks a semi truck that was blown over in high winds from Hurricane Jeanne at a TA Travel Center in Vero Beach, Florida 26 September, 2004. Jeanne battered Florida Sunday, smashing homes, tearing off roofs, flooding streets and leaving one million people without electricity. The fourth hurricane to pummel Florida in six weeks, Jeanne made landfall at the same spot where Charley had slammed into its southeastern coast earlier this month. It then headed inland, prompting authorities to issue a hurricane warning for areas of western Florida along the Gulf of Mexico. When it slammed ashore, it was a powerful category three hurricane packing winds of 193 kilometers (120 miles) per hour, with higher gusts. AFP PHOTO / Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Levi Taylor rescues cats from the home of an elderly neighbor after a tree fell on the home due to high winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Vero Beach, Florida. Levi stated that she does not know where her elderly neighbor is and that she wanted to help by taking in her cats and dogs. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT PIERCE, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: A dead bird lies on the ground infront of a boat damaged by Hurricane Jeanne after it made landfall September 26, 2004 in Fort Pierce, Florida. Jeanne, which has been downgraded to a tropical storm, moved across the state of Florida after making landfall the night before. (Photo byJoshua Rodas/Getty Images)
RIVERA BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: A sailboat rests on the shore after it was blown onto land by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 at Phil Foster Park in Palm Beach, Florida. Jeanne came ashore between Stuart and Fort Pierce, Florida at about midnight. Jeanne is the fourth storm to hit the Florida in last 6 weeks.(Photo by G. De Cardenas/Getty Images)
RIVERA BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Debris from mobile homes damaged by Hurricane Jeanne is strewn about September 26, 2004 in Rivera Beach, Florida. Jeanne battered southeastern Florida Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported. (Photo by G. De Cardenas/Getty Images)
RIVERA BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Debris from mobile homes damaged by Hurricane Jeanne is strewn about September 26, 2004 in Rivera Beach, Florida. Jeanne battered southeastern Florida Sunday, tearing off roofs and felling trees and power lines after slamming ashore at the same spot Frances did three weeks ago. The fourth hurricane to pummel the southeastern state in six weeks, Jeanne knocked out power to over a million people along the Atlantic coast. Numerous telephone outages also were reported.(Photo by G. De Cardenas/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Casey Bunch stands in a hotel room where he saved a man who was hiding under the mattress as the hotel room around him was torn apart by winds from Hurricane Jeanne September 26, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Casey is a roofing contractor and was staying at the hotel as he worked on houses torn apart by previous hurricanes. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT PIERCE, FL - SEPTEMBER 26: Debris sits at a mobile home park after Hurricane Jeanne made landfall September 26, 2004 in Fort Pierce, Florida. Jeanne, which has been downgraded to a tropical storm, moved across the state of Florida after making landfall the night before. (Photo by Joshua Rodas/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: A home is seen without a roof after Hurricane Jeanne blew through September 27, 2004 in Sebastian, Florida. Jeanne left millions of people without power as it made it's way across the state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: Destroyed homes are seen after hurricane Jeanne blew through September 27, 2004 in Vero Beach, Florida. Jeanne left millions of people without power as it made it's way across the state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: A destroyed home is seen after hurricane Jeanne blew through September 27, 2004 near Sebastian, Florida. Jeanne left millions of people without power as it made it's way across the state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT PIERCE, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: Boats lay near a damaged wharf after hurricane Jeanne passed through September 27, 2004 in Fort Pierce, Florida. Jeanne left millions of people without power as it made it's way across the state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
VERO BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: Aguedo Gamez surveys damage to his mobile home, which was destroyed by Hurricane Jeanne, September 27, 2004 in Vero Beach, Florida. Gamez is now staying with a friend as he awaits FEMA aid, and hopes to rebuild on the same lot. (Photo by Joshua Rodas/Getty Images)
SEBASTIAN, FL - SEPTEMBER 27: A boat is washed up near a roadway after hurricane Jeanne blew through September 27, 2004 near Sebastian, Florida. Jeanne left millions of people without power as it made it's way across the state. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT PIERCE, FL - SEPTEMBER 28: Power lines are shown slighly toppled after Hurricane Jeanne slammed into the area knocking out power to most homes September 28, 2004 in Fort Pierce, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT PIERCE, FL - SEPTEMBER 28: Mitch Alliston cleans up a hotel room after hurricane Jeanne tore through the area causing damage to the hotel September 28, 2004 in Fort Pierce, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Dominican Blanca Calcaneo surveys her damaged house in Juana Vicenta in the outskirts of Samana, Dominican Republic, following the passing of Hurricane Jeanne, Friday, Sept. 17, 2004. (AP Photo/Miguel Gomez)
Dominicans walks arround destroyed sail boats at the Samana sea port in Samana, Dominican Republic, after the passing of Hurricane Jeanne, Friday, Sept. 17, 2004. (AP Photo/Miguel Gomez)
George MacArthur screws plywood into the walls of his Fort Pierce, Fla. trailer house Friday, Sept. 24, 2004 as Hurricane Jeanne moved westward Friday on a path that could lead to Florida's east coast by Sunday. (AP Photo/J.pat Carter)
A Fort Pierce store still has the sign begging to its power restored Friday, Sept. 24, 2004 as Hurricane Jeanne approaches the Florida coast. The sign was left from Hurricane Frances. (AP Photo/J. Pat Carter)
Melania Martinez surveys her destroyed home in the outskirtks of Nagua, about 200 Kilometers (124 miles) to the north of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, after the passing of Hurricane Jeanne, Friday, Sept. 17, 2004. (AP Photo/Walter Astrada)
Signs on a Stuart, Fla. business express the feelings of many on Floirda's Treasure Coast Saturday, Sept. 24, 2004 as Hurricane Jeanne heads towards Florida. Jeanne will be the fourth major storm to hit Florida in less than six weeks. (AP Photo/J. Pat Carter)
A boat storage facility is damaged at the Taylor Creek Marina in Fort Pierce, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 26, 2004, a day after Hurricane Jeanne struck the area. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Damaged airplanes lie inside a destroyed hangar at Witham Field in Stuart, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 26, 2004, a day after Hurricane Jeanne struck the area. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
A boatowner walks through the storm to check his boat as a houseboat lies partially submerged as winds and waves from Hurricane Jeanne continue to batter a yacht basin in Titusville, Fla., on Sunday, Sept.25, 2004. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
John Dangova of West Palm Beach, Fla., sits among the rubble of the lobby of the Palmwood Motor Lodge in Sebastion, Fla., on Sunday, Sept. 26, 2004. Winds from Hurricane Jeanne blew out the lobby in the middle of the night when it made landfall nearby. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
Holding an orange President Bush gets ready to make a statement after touring damage from Hurricane Jeanne at Mckenna Brothers orange groves in Lake Wales, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2004. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Brazilian doctors with the U.N. peacekeepers care for a Haitian man with two broken legs suffered during Hurricane Jeanne at the provisional clinic run by the U.N. peacekeepers in Gonaives, Haiti, Friday, Oct. 1, 2004. (AP Photo/Kent Gilbert)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

More from AOL.com:
Burned as baby, woman finally meets nurse who cared for her
Negotiators reach deal on weapons withdrawal in east Ukraine
Congress: US fails to stop most people trying to join ISIS

Read Full Story

People are Reading