With next term looming, US top court's justices mull new cases

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The Supreme Court's New Term Likely Won't Outdo the Last One


The U.S. Supreme Court's nine justices meet behind closed doors on Monday ahead of the Oct. 5 beginning of their new term to consider cases to add to a calendar that already includes significant cases on affirmative action and labor unions.

In an important case the justices may consider, the U.S. government is seeking to overturn an appeals court decision that threw out two major insider trading convictions secured by federal prosecutors.

SEE ALSO: Govt. workers have right to refuse gay marriage licenses: pope

During their private meeting, which starts at 9:30 a.m., the justices will review hundreds of cases that piled up over their summer recess. The court is expected to announce later in the week which cases it will hear during the term that begins on the first Monday in October and ends in June.

Later this year, the justices are due to decide whether to hear a major case involving Republican-backed restrictions on abortion access under Texas law. The court has not decided an abortion case since 2007.

See protesters push back against Texas' abortion law:

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With next term looming, US top court's justices mull new cases
College students and abortion rights activists hold signs during a rally on the steps of the Texas Capitol, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Austin, Texas. The demonstrators are urging an easing of strict limits on abortion that prompted massive protests but were overwhelmingly approved last session. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Two signs that read "Who Lobbied For This?, " and "We Need Healthcare Options, Not Obstacles", are held by attendees to a rally in front of city hall where a group of nearly 200 gathered to protest the approval of sweeping new restrictions on abortion, Monday, July 15, 2013, in Dallas. The gathering came as part of the National Day of Action that included similar rallies planned in several cities. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Activists tie on hospital gowns as they prepare to protest House Bill 3994 in the rotunda of the Texas Capitol, Friday, May 22, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Part of the bill would require women to present a government-issued ID before receiving abortion services. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
FILE - In this Aug. 19, 2014 file photo, a group holds signs about Texas Gov. Rick Perry as he leaves the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center after he was booked and released, in Austin, Texas. Austin has made itself a painful exception to Republican rule in Texas. The big college town is home to the grand jury that indicted Perry while he was in office and to judges who authorized a gay wedding and struck down abortion restrictions and GOP cuts to public schools. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott this month is signing laws that will draw power away from solidly Democratic Travis County and weaken its local jurisdiction over state business done inside its borders. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
FILE - In this July 12, 2013 file photo, Cecile Richards, daughter of former Texas Gov. Ann Richards and president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, greets abortion rights advocates as they leave the State Capitol rotunda in Austin, Texas. Abortions have declined in states where new laws make it harder to have them - but they’ve also waned in states where abortion rights are protected, an Associated Press survey finds. Nearly everywhere, in red states and blue, abortions are down since 2010. "Better access to birth control and sex education are the biggest factors in reducing unintended pregnancies," said Richards. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa, File)
A man walks past the former site of a clinic that offered abortions in El Paso, Texas, Friday, Oct. 3, 2014. Abortion services for many Texas women require a round trip of more than 200 miles, or a border-crossing into Mexico or New Mexico after federal appellate judges allowed full implementation of a law that has closed more than 80 percent of Texas' abortion clinics. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca)
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, center, talks with news reporters during a round table talk in his office at the Texas Capitol, Wednesday, June 3, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Rep. Mike Schoefield, R-Katy, packs up his desk after the House adjourned on the final day of the legislative session in the House Chamber at the Texas Capitol, Monday, June 1, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Guns, tax cuts and border security: new Republican Gov. Greg Abbott made those priorities his first six months on the job, and after the Texas Legislature ends Monday, he'll claim plenty of victories. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott shares a laugh with news reporters during a round table talk in his office at the Texas Capitol, Wednesday, June 3, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A man walks into a clinic that offers abortions in Santa Teresa, N.M., Friday, Oct. 3, 2014. Abortion services for many Texas women require a round trip of more than 200 miles, or a border-crossing into Mexico or New Mexico after federal appellate judges allowed full implementation of a law that has closed more than 80 percent of Texas' abortion clinics. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca)
Texas Rep. Matt Krause, R- Fort Worth, left, talks with Rep. Geanie Morrison, R-Victoria, right, in the House Chamber, Wednesday, May 13, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Morrison has proposed a bill making it more difficult for girls younger than 18 who face extreme circumstances to have abortions without their parents' consent. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Anti-abortion supporters march to the Texas Capitol during a Texas Rally for Life, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
A man walks into a clinic that offers abortions in Santa Teresa, N.M., Friday, Oct. 3, 2014. Abortion services for many Texas women require a round trip of more than 200 miles, or a border-crossing into Mexico or New Mexico after federal appellate judges allowed full implementation of a law that has closed more than 80 percent of Texas' abortion clinics. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca)
Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, left, talks with Sen. Juan "Chuy" Hinojosa, D-Brownsville, right, in the Senate Chamber, Tuesday, May 5, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Under a bill that has cleared the Republican-controlled Senate Tuesday, most abortions in Texas could not be covered by insurance purchased through the Affordable Care Act. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2015 file photo, college students and abortion rights activists hold signs and pray during a rally on the steps of the then Texas Capitol, to urge an easing of strict limits on abortions, in Austin, Texas. Abortions have declined in states where new laws make it harder to have them - but they’ve also waned in states where abortion rights are protected, an Associated Press survey finds. Nearly everywhere, in red states and blue, abortions are down since 2010. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Anti-abortion supporters carry signs and a life-sized photo of Pope John Paul II as they march to the Texas Capitol during a Texas Rally for Life, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Anti-abortion supporters march through downtown as they head to the Texas Capitol during a Texas Rally for Life, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
AUSTIN, TX - JULY 01: Supporters of Texas women's right to reproductive decisions rally at the Texas State capitol on July 1, 2013 in Austin, Texas. This is first day of a second legislative special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - JULY 01: Supporters of Texas women's right to reproductive decisions rally at the Texas State capitol on July 1, 2013 in Austin, Texas. This is first day of a second legislative special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - JULY 01: A pro-life supporter in the Texas State capitol on July 1, 2013 in Austin, Texas. This is first day of a second legislative special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - JULY 01: Texas Sen. Wendy Davis (D-Ft. Worth) leads a rally in support of Texas women's right to reproductive decisions at the Texas state capitol on July 1, 2013 in Austin, Texas. This is first day of a second legislative special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - JUNE 25: Reproductive rights advocates fill the Texas capitol celebrating the defeat of the controversial anti-abortion bill SB5, which was up for a vote on the last day of the legislative special session June 25, 2013 in Austin, Texas. A combination of State Sen. Wendy Davis' (D-Ft. Worth) 13-hour filibuster and protests by reproductive rights advocates helped to ultimately defeat the controversial abortion legislation at midnight. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2014 file photo, the Hilltop Women's Reproductive clinic is photographed in El Paso, Texas. A federal judge Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, threw out new Texas abortion restrictions that would have effectively closed more than a dozen clinics in the state. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel sided with clinics that sued over one of the most disputed measures of a sweeping anti-abortion bill signed by Republican Gov. Rick Perry in 2013. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca, File)
File - In this Oct. 29, 2013 file photo, Dottie and Tom Knodell, opponents of abortion, hold signs outside a Planned Parenthood Clinic, in San Antonio. A U.S. appeals court on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, issued a ruling reinstating most of Texas' tough new abortion restrictions, which means as many as 12 clinics will not be able to perform the procedure starting as soon as Friday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
FILE - In this July 12, 2013, file photo, abortion rights supporters rally on the floor of the State Capitol rotunda in Austin, Texas. A sharply divided Supreme Court on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, allowed Texas to continue enforcing abortion restrictions that opponents say have led more than a third of the state's clinics to stop providing abortions. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa, File)
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Before the court recessed for the summer, it had already picked several high-profile cases for the new term. They include a challenge to racial preferences in higher education admissions and a bid to prevent public sector unions from collecting fees from non-members.

In the insider trading case, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli has asked the high court to throw out a December ruling by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York that reversed the convictions of hedge fund managers Todd Newman and Anthony Chiasson.

The ruling marked a major setback for an insider trading crackdown underway since 2009 by Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, whose office brought charges against 96 people.

Another case up for discussion is an appeal by Iran's central bank seeking to prevent $2 billion from being transferred to terrorism victims.

The court will also consider a challenge to Major League Baseball's longstanding exemption from antitrust laws.

When the justices take to the bench next Monday for the term's first oral arguments, it will mark their first time together publicly since last term's acrimonious end in June.

The court ruled 5-4 on the term's last day to uphold Oklahoma's lethal injection procedure even as two justices, Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, questioned the death penalty's constitutionality.

That came just days after the court's liberals forged 5-4 majorities in major rulings legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide and rejecting a conservative challenge to the Obamacare healthcare law.

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