Israeli police can open fire on Palestinian stone-throwers

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Israeli Police Can Open Fire on Palestinian Stone-Throwers


"We ask you to stop throwing stones."

Israeli police are now allowed to open fire on Palestinian protesters who throw rocks and firebombs.

The practice of hurling stones and firebombs is a popular form of protest among Palestinians, especially young people.

"Israeli authorities can use rifles and handguns, while protesters only have slingshots loaded with stones," an RT anchor reported.

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Israeli police can open fire on Palestinian stone-throwers
In this Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 photo, a Palestinian villager stands guard in front of graffiti depicting late Yasser Arafat and Arabic that reads "the mountain is not shaken by the wind," at the entrance of the West Bank village of al-Jab'a, near Bethlehem. The Residents of the village formed groups of defense volunteers to guard themselves from attacks of Israeli settlers. While the village's mosque was vandalized and torched by Israeli extremists earlier this year, tensions rose higher this week after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death and left his family seriously wounded. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 photo, Palestinian villagers stand guard at the entrance of the West Bank village of al-Jab'a, near Bethlehem. The Residents of the village formed groups of defense volunteers to guard themselves from attacks of Israeli settlers. While the village's mosque was vandalized and torched by Israeli extremists earlier this year, tensions rose higher this week after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death and left his family seriously wounded. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 photo, Palestinian villagers inspect a vehicle at the entrance of the West Bank village of al-Jab'a, near Bethlehem. The Residents of the village formed groups of defense volunteers to guard themselves from attacks of Israeli settlers. While the village's mosque was vandalized and torched by Israeli extremists earlier this year, tensions rose higher this week after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death and left his family seriously wounded. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
Palestinian demonstrators throw stones toward Israeli army soldiers during clashes at the entrance to Duma village near the West Bank city of Nablus, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. Tensions remain high after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death. The child's 4-year-old brother and both his parents were also seriously wounded. The attack drew Palestinian anger and widespread Israeli condemnation. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
Israeli members of the gay community and peace activists rally, calling for a stop to the the violence, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015, after recent attack on a Gay Pride parade in Jerusalem and an arson attack in the West Bank which killed a Palestinian toddler. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)
A masked Palestinian demonstrator rests on the asphalt during clashes with Israeli army soldiers, at the entrance of the Jalazoun refugee camp, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. Tensions remain high after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death. The child's 4-year-old brother and both his parents were also seriously wounded. The attack drew Palestinian anger and widespread Israeli condemnation. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
Israeli members of the gay community and supporters rally, calling for a stop to the the violence in Tel Aviv, Israel, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015, after recent attack on a Gay Pride parade in Jerusalem and an arson attack in the West Bank which killed a Palestinian toddler. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)
A Palestinian demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister fired by Israeli soldiers during clashes at the entrance to Duma village near the West Bank city of Nablus, Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. Tensions remain high after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death. The child's 4-year-old brother and both his parents were also seriously wounded. The attack drew Palestinian anger and widespread Israeli condemnation. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
Palestinian demonstrators throw stones toward Israeli army soldiers during clashes at the entrance to Duma village near the West Bank city of Nablus, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. Tensions remain high after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned a sleeping Palestinian toddler to death. The child's 4-year-old brother and both his parents were also seriously wounded. The attack drew Palestinian anger and widespread Israeli condemnation. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)
Israeli border police officers chase Palestinian demonstrators during clashes at the entrance of the Jalazoun refugee camp, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. Tensions remain high after suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home and burned the sleeping Palestinian toddler to death. The child's 4-year-old brother and both his parents were also seriously wounded. The attack drew Palestinian anger and widespread Israeli condemnation. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
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Israel's Security Cabinet blessing a live ammunition response is often presented by critics as a disproportionate and even criminal reaction, but stone-throwing can be fatal.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu blamed stone-throwers for the recent death of a driver who apparently lost control of his car. Protesters had pelted his car and the road he was traveling on.

Previously, Israeli police were allowed to open fire on stone-throwers if officers believed their own lives were in danger — as an IDF brigade commander says was the case in July when he fatally shot 17-year-old Palestinian Mohammed al-Kasbah.

Now, Israeli officers can also fire if they believe a civilian's life is at risk. Israel's Security Cabinet is also pushing legislation that would impose mandatory minimum sentences on stone-throwers, and fine the parents of convicted minors.
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