For 1st time, New York City schools close for Muslim holiday

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Eid al-Adha around the world
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For 1st time, New York City schools close for Muslim holiday
TEHRAN, Sept. 24, 2015-- An Iranian Muslim prays during the Eid al-Adha festival in Tehran, Iran, on Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, marking the end of the Hajj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels. (Xinhua/Ahmad Halabisaz via Getty Images)
A Muslim prays during the religious festivities of Eid al-Adha at the mosque in Cherbourg-Octeville, northwestern France on September 24, 2015. AFP PHOTO / CHARLY TRIBALLEAU (Photo credit should read CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP/Getty Images)
AMMAN, Sept. 24, 2015-- Muslims pray during the Eid al-Adha festival in Amman, Jordan, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims across the world celebrated the annual Eid al-Adha, or the Festival of Sacrifice, on Thursday. (Xinhua/Mohammad Abu Ghosh via Getty Images)
Egyptians pray Eid al-Adha prayers outside al-Seddik mosque in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims all over the world celebrate the three-day festival Eid al-Adha, by sacrificing sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate the willingness of the Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham to Christians and Jews) to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Shiite fighters, known as Houthis, inspect the the scene at the al-Balili mosque after two suicide bombings at the mosque during Eid al-Adha prayers in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
An Egyptian girl plays with a balloon during Eid al-Adha prayers at Al-Azhar mosque in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, which commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim, or Abraham as he is known in the Bible, to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. (AP Photo)
Worshippers take part in Eid al-Adha prayers at Al-Azhar mosque in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, which commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim, or Abraham as he is known in the Bible, to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. (AP Photo)
Afghans offer Eid al-Adha prayers in Eid Gah mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Adha or Eid-e Qurban in local language, the Festival of Sacrifice, to mark the end of the hajj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
Iraqis enjoy the first day of Eid al-Adha in a park in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrated Eid al-Adha which commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim, or Abraham as he is known in the Bible, to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)
Muslims cover their mouths and noses from the haze from wildfires as they walk to attend a morning prayer marking the Eid al-Adha in Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Slash-and-burn practices destroy huge areas of Indonesian forest every summer during the dry season, creating haze that blankets parts of the archipelago and neighboring Malaysia and Singapore. (AP Photo)
Bosnian Muslim people pray during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, inside of a mosque in the remote mountain village of Lukomir, 50 kms south of Sarajevo, on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Bosnian Muslims will slaughter cattle later, with the beef and meat distributed to the needy for the holiday which honors the prophet Abraham for preparing to sacrifice his son on the order of God, who was testing his faith. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A Bosnian Muslim woman knits in front of her house as she waits for family members to arrive for lunch to celebrate Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in the remote mountain village of Lukomir, 50 kms south of Sarajevo, on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Bosnian Muslims will slaughter cattle later, with the beef and meat distributed to the needy for the holiday which honors the prophet Abraham for preparing to sacrifice his son on the order of God, who was testing his faith. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A Nigerian Muslim boy takes a selfie in Lagos, Nigeria,Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015, during the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) which is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God. The festival falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the final month of the Muslim Calendar. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest day.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Nigerian Muslim chiefs offer prayers in Lagos, Nigeria,Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015, during the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) which is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God. The festival falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the final month of the Muslim Calendar. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest day.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
Iraqi Muslims shop for sheeps at a market during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrated Eid al-Adha which commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim, or Abraham as he is known in the Bible, to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. The holiday started Sunday in Iraq. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)
An Iraqi Muslim man buys a sheep from a market during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrated Eid al-Adha which commemorates the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim, or Abraham as he is known in the Bible, to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's will, though in the end God provides him a sheep to sacrifice instead. The holiday started Sunday in Iraq. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)
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NEW YORK (AP) -- New York City public schools are closed to observe the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha (eed ahl-AHD'-hah).

Thursday was the first time the schools serving 1.1 million pupils closed for a Muslim holiday. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced this year that the city's public schools would observe the two Muslim holy days of Eid al-Fitr (eed ahl-FIH'-tur) and Eid al-Adha.

Eid al-Adha is known as the Feast of the Sacrifice. It commemorates the willingness of Ibrahim - Abraham to Christians and Jews - to sacrifice his son.

New York City schools were closed Wednesday for the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur.

Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina (fah-REEN'-yah) attended a celebration of Eid-al-Adha on Thursday at the Children's Museum of Manhattan.

An exhibit on Muslim cultures will open at the museum in February.

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